Aŋguttara Nikāya


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Aŋguttara Nikāya
Chakka Nipāta
VII. Devatā Vagga

Sutta 65

Anāgāmi-Phala Suttaɱ

The Fruit of Non-Returning

Translated from the Pali

 


 

[1][pts] I HEAR TELL:

Once upon a time the Lucky Man,
Savatthi-town revisiting,
Anāthapiṇḍika's Jeta Grove.|| ||

There then, the Lucky Man addressed the beggars:

"Beggars!"

And the beggars responding "Venerable!", the Lucky Man said this:

2. There are six things, beggars, which,
if not given up,
make it impossible to see for yourself
the fruit of non-reutning.

What six?

Lack of faith,
lack of a sense of shame,
lack of a fear of blame,
slacking off,[1]
mis-remembering what is true,[2]
lack of wisdom.[3]

These then, beggars, are the six things, which,
if not given up,
make it impossible to see for yourself
the fruit of non-reutning.

 


 

3. There are six things, beggars, which,
if given up,
make it possible to see for yourself
the fruit of non-reutning.

What six?

Lack of faith,
lack of a sense of shame,
lack of a fear of blame,
slacking off,
mis-remembering what is true,
lack of wisdom.

These then, beggars, are the six things, which,
if given up,
make it possible to see for yourself
the fruit of non-reutning.

 


[1] Kosajja. Uncool!

[2] Muṭṭha-saccaɱ. Muṭṭha: [past participle of mussati] having forgotten. PED has muṭṭha-saccaɱ as forgotten-mindedness, Hare uses 'forgetfulness in mindfulness. Bhk. Bodhi: muddle-mindedness. No one addresses 'sacca': truth, reality.

[3] Duppaññataɱ. Stupidity. Being stupified. We tend to think of stupidity as a genetic trait, but it is here intended to mean a condition which can be remedied.

 


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