Aŋguttara Nikāya


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Aŋguttara-Nikāya
Pañcaka-Nipāta
25. Du-c-carita Vagga

The Book of the Gradual Sayings
The Book of the Fives
Chapter XXV: Walking in Evil

Sutta 249

Sīvathikā Suttaɱ

The Cemetery

Translated by E. M. Hare

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[195]

[1] Thus have I heard:

Once the Exalted One dwelt near Sāvatthī;
and there he addressed the monks, saying:

"Monks."

'Yes, lord,' they replied;
and the Exalted One said:

"Monks, there are these five disadvantages in a cemetery.

What five?

It is unclean,
evil-smelling,
fearful,
the haunt of bestial non-humans,[1]
and is the cause of many folk wailing.[2]

Verily, monks, these are the five disadvantages in a cemetery.

 

§

 

Even so, monks, there are these five disadvantages
in a cemetery-like person.

What five?

Consider, monks, some person
who follows the course of unclean action in deed,
who follows the course of unclean action in word
who follows the course of unclean action in thought —
I declare this to be his uncleanness.

Monks, just as that cemetery is unclean,
thus-like I declare this person to be.

 

§

 

[196] Whoso follows the course of unclean action in deed,
whoso follows the course of unclean action in word
whoso follows the course of unclean action in thought,
an evil rumour of his worth goes about —
I declare this to be his evil smell.

Monks, just as that cemetery is evil-smelling,
thus-like I declare this person to be.

 

 

At once his course is of unclean action in deed,
of unclean action in word
of unclean action in thought,
his pious[3] fellows in the godly life
turn themselves from him
and keep far away —
I declare this to be his fearfulness.

Monks, just as that cemetery is fearful,
thus-like I declare this person to be.

 

 

As he follows that course of unclean action in deed,
that course of unclean action in word
that course of unclean action in thought,
he lives with others,
sharing their ways —
I declare this to be his bestial haunting.[4]

Monks, just as that cemetery is the haunt of bestial non-humans,
thus-like I declare this person to be.

 

 

Seeing him thus following this course of unclean action in deed,
this course of unclean action in word
this course of unclean action in thought,

his pious fellows in the godly life become vexed
and say:

"Alas! this is an ill thing for us,
who have to live with such a person!"

I declare this to be his making others wail.

Monks, just as that cemetery is the cause of many folk wailing,
thus-like I declare this person to be.

Verily, monks, there are these five disadvantages in a cemetery-like person.'

 


[1] As at § 77 above, see note.

[2] Ārodana, causative of √rud.

[3] Pesala, following the traditional explanation: piya-sīla.

[4] Vāḷāvasatha


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