Aŋguttara Nikāya


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Aŋguttara Nikāya
VIII. Aṭṭhaka Nipāta
I: Mettā Vagga

The Book of the Gradual Sayings
VIII. The Book of the Eights
I. On Amity

Sutta 4

Dutiya Piya Suttaɱ

Qualities not Endearing (b)

Translated from the Pali by E.M. Hare.

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[156] [107]

[1][bodh] Thus have I heard:

Once the Exalted One was dwelling near Sāvatthī,
at Jeta Grove,
in Anāthapiṇḍika's Park.

There the Exalted One addressed the monks, saying:

"Monks."

"Yes, lord," they replied, and the Exalted One said:

"Monks, a monk possessed of eight qualities
is neither dear,
nor pleasing to,
nor honoured,
by his fellows in the godly life,
nor what he ought to become.

What eight?

Herein a monk longs for possessions;
he longs for honour;
he longs for distinction[1]
he does not know the proper times;
he knows no moderation;
he is impure;
he is garrulous;
and he insults and abuses his fellows in the godly life.

Monks, possessed of these eight qualities
a monk is neither dear,
nor pleasing to,
nor honoured by his fellows in the godly life,
nor what he ought to become.

 

§

 

[2]'Monks, a monk possessed of eight qualities
is dear,
pleasing to,
honoured,
by his fellows in the godly life,
and is what he ought to become.

What eight?

Herein a monk does not long for possessions;
he does not long for honour;
he does not long for distinction
he knows the proper times;
he knows moderation;
he is not impure;
he is not garrulous;
and he does not insult and abuse his fellows in the godly life.

Monks, possessed of these eight qualities
a monk is dear,
pleasing to,
honoured by his fellows in the godly life,
and is what he ought to become.

 


[1] Bhāvanīyo. Cf. p. 1.

[2] The text repeats in full. [Ed. Reconstructed for this edition.]


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