Aŋguttara Nikāya


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Aŋguttara Nikāya
VIII. Aṭṭhaka Nipāta
III: Gahapati-Vagga

The Book of the Gradual Sayings
The Book of the Eights
III: On Householders

Sutta 22

Hatthigāmaka Ugga Suttaɱ

Ugga of Hatthigāma

Translated from the Pali by E.M. Hare.

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[212] [145]

[1][bodh] Thus have I heard:

Once the Exalted One was dwelling at Hatthigāma among the Vajjīans.

There the Exalted One addressed the monks, saying:

"Monks!"

'Hold it true, monks,
that Ugga,[1] the householder of Hatthigāma,
is possessed of eight marvellous and wonderful qualities.'

And when the Well-farer had thus spoken,
rising from his seat,
he entered his dwelling.

[146] Now a certain monk,
robing himself early in the morning,
taking bowl and cloak,
went to the house of Ugga, the householder of Hatthigāma,
and there sat down on a seat made ready for him,
and Ugga the householder of Hatthigāma approached that monk,
saluted him and sat down at one side.

Then said that monk to Ugga:

'It has been declared by the Exalted One
that you, O householder,
are possessed of eight marvelous and wonderful qualities.

What are those eight marvelous and wonderful qualities, householder,
of which you are declared by the Exalted One to be possessed?'

Said Ugga, the householder of Hatthigāma:

'Nay, reverend sir,
I know not of what eight marvelous and wonderful qualities
I am declared by the Exalted One to be possessed;
but as to the eight marvelous and wonderful qualities found in me,
listen, lend and ear and I will tell you.'

'Very well, householder,'
replied the monk;
and Ugga said:

'When, sir, I was sporting in Nāga glade,[2]
I saw the Exalted One a good way off,
and at the sight of him,
my mind became tranquil
and my drunkenness vanished.

This is the first marvellous and wonderful quality quality found in me.

Then, with tranquil heart
I drew nigh and reverenced the Exalted One.

And to me he preached a graduated discourse,
that is to say:
on almsgiving,
on virtue
and on heaven.
He set forth the peril,
the folly,
the depravity of lusts
and the advantages of renunciation.

And when the Exalted One knew
that my heart was clear, malleable,
free from hindrance,
uplifted,
lucid,
then he revealed to me
that Dhamma-teaching
to which Buddhas alone have won,
to wit:

Ill,
its coming-to-be,
its ending
and the Way.

Just as a clean cloth,
free of all stain,
will take dye perfectly;
even so, as I sat there,
there arose within me
the spotless, stainless Dhamma-sight:
that whatsoever is conditioned by coming-to-be,
all that is subject to ending.

I, sir, saw Dhamma,
possessed Dhamma,
found Dhamma,
penetrated Dhamma,
overcame doubt,
surpassed uncertainty,
possessed without another's aid
perfect confidence in the word of the Teacher,
and there and then took refuge
in the Buddha, in Dhamma and in the Order,
and embraced the five rules of training
in the godly life.

This is the second
marvelous and wonderful quality found in me.

Now, sir, I had four wives,
young girls,
and I went and spoke to them thus:

"Sisters, I have embraced the five rules of training in the godly life.

Who wishes, may enjoy the wealth of this place,
or may do deeds of merit,
or may go to her own relations and family;
or is there some man you desire
to whom I may give you?"

And when I stopped speaking,
the eldest wife said to me:|| ||

"Sir, give me to such and such a man!"

Then I had that man sent for;
and, taking my wife by the left hand
and holding the water pot in my right,
that man (by an act of dedication).
Yet I was not a whit discomfited
at parting with my wife.

This is the third
marvelous and wonderful quality found in me.

Moreover, sir, there is wealth in my family,
but among the good and lovely in character
it is shared impartially.

This is the fourth
marvelous and wonderful quality found in me.

And when I wait upon a monk, sir,
I serve him respectfully
and not without deference.

This is the fifth
marvelous and wonderful quality found in me.

It is, sir, nothing wonderful for devas to come and tell me,
when I have invited the Order,
that such an one is freed-both-ways;[3]
that he is wisdom-freed;
that he is a seer-in-body;
that he is a view-winner;
that he is faith-freed;
that he is a Dhamma-follower;
that he is a faith-follower;
that he is virtuous and lovely in character;
or that such an one is wicked and evil in character.

But, sir, while I wait on the Order,
I wot of no such thoughts,
suggesting:[4]

"To him I will give little."

"To him I will give much."

Rather, sir, I give impartially.

This is the sixth quality
marvelous and wonderful quality found in me.

Furthermore, sir,
it is not uncommon for devas to come
and declare to me:

"Perfectly, O householder,
is Dhamma proclaimed by the Exalted One!"

When they speak thus, I reply:

"Ho! You devas,
whether you declare so or not,
Dhamma is perfectly proclaimed by the Exalted One!"

Yet, sir, I feel no elation
because of such thoughts as:

"It is to me these devas come."

"I am the man who talks to devas."

This is the seventh
marvelous and wonderful quality found in me.

Moreover, sir, if I should die before the Exalted One,
that would not be very wonderful.

But that the Exalted One should declare of me:

"There is no fetter,
fettered by which,
Ugga, the householder of Hatthigāma,
shall come again to this world"[5]
- (that is wonderful).

This, sir, is the eighth marvellous and wonderful quality found in me.

Indeed, sir, these are the eight
marvellous and wonderful quality found in me
but I know not of what eight
marvellous and wonderful qualities
I am declared by the Exalted One to be possessed.'

 

§

 

Then that monk,
after taking alms at Ugga's house,
rose from his seat and departed.

And when he had eaten his meal,
after his alms-round,
he went to the Exalted One
and saluting him,
sat down at one side.|| ||

So seated, he told the Exalted One
of all his conversation
with Ugga the householder of Hatthigāma.

And the Exalted One said:

'Well done, well done, monk!

As Ugga, the householder of Hatthigāma,
in explaining the matter rightly
should explain;
even so, monk,
he is declared by me
to be possessed of those eight
marvelous and wonderful qualities.

Moreover, monk,
hold it true
that Ugga, the householder of Hatthigāma, is so possessed!"

 


[1] At A. i, 26 he is called 'the chief servitor of the Order'; see A.A. i, 395 for an account of him. At both references his name is spelt Uggata.

[2] Comy. observes that this glade belonged to him. A.A. i, 396, referring to the same occasion, remarks that he had been drunk seven days, and went surrounded by nautch girls.

[3] Above, p. 7.

[4] Uppādento.

[5] Comy. Iminā upāsako attano anāgāmi-phalaɱ vyākaroti.


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