Aŋguttara Nikāya


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Aŋguttara Nikāya
X. Dasaka-Nipāta
III. Mahā Vagga

The Book of the Gradual Sayings
X. The Book of the Tens
III: The Great Chapter

Sutta 23

Kāya Suttaɱ

With Body

Translated from the Pali by F. L. Woodward, M.A.

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[39] [26]

[1][bodh] Thus have I heard:

Once the Exalted One was dwelling near Sāvatthī.

There the Exalted One addressed the monks, saying:

"Monks."

"Yes, lord," they replied, and the Exalted One said:

"Monks, there are things to be abandoned with body,
not with speech;
there are things to be abandoned with speech,
not body;
things to be abandoned neither with body nor with speech,
but by insight on seeing them.

 

§

 

And what things are to be abandoned with body,
not speech?

[27] Herein a monk has committed a fault
in a certain direction
with body.

His discreet co-mates in the brahma-life
after investigation
say thus:

'Your reverence has committed a fault
in a certain direction
with body.

It were well if your reverence were to give up
wrong bodily practices
and make good bodily practices to grow.'

He then, thus spoken to
by his discreet co-mates in the brahma-life
after investigation,
abandons wrong bodily practice
and makes good bodily practice to grow.

These, monks, are called:
'things to be abandoned with body,
not speech.'

 

§

 

And what sort of things, monks,
are to be abandoned in speech,
not body?

Herein a monk has committed a fault
in a certain direction
with speech.

Then his discreet co-mates in the brahma-life
after investigation
say this:

'Your reverence has committed a fault
in a certain direction
in speech.

It were well if your reverence were to abandon
wrong practice in speech
and make good practice in speech to grow.'

He then, thus spoken to by his discreet co-mates in the brahma-life
after investigation,
abandons wrong practice in speech
and makes good practice in speech to grow.

These, monks, are called
'things to be abandoned in speech,
not body.'

 

§

 

And what sort of things, monks, are to be abandoned
neither with body
nor in speech,
but on seeing them with insight?

[1] Lust, monks, is to be abandoned
neither with body
nor in speech,
but on seeing it by insight.

[2] Malice, monks, is to be abandoned
neither with body
nor in speech,
but on seeing it by insight.

[3] Delusion, monks, is to be abandoned
neither with body
nor in speech,
but on seeing it by insight.

[4] Wrath, monks, is to be abandoned
neither with body
nor in speech,
but on seeing it by insight.

[5] Grudge, monks, is to be abandoned
neither with body
nor in speech,
but on seeing it by insight.

[6] Depreciation, monks, is to be abandoned
neither with body
nor in speech,
but on seeing it by insight.

[7] Spite, monks, is to be abandoned
neither with body
nor in speech,
but on seeing it by insight.

[8] Selfishness, monks, is to be abandoned
neither with body
nor in speech,
but on seeing it by insight.

[9] Wrongful envy, monks, is to be abandoned
neither with body
nor in speech,
but on seeing it by insight.

 

§

 

And of what sort, monks, is wrongful envy?

Herein, monks, a housefather
or housefather's son
is affluent in wealth of grain
or silver
or gold.

Then it occurs to some slave or underling:[1]

'0 that affluence belonged not to this housefather
or his son
in wealth of grain
or silver
or gold!'

Or suppose some recluse or brahmin
gets a good supply of robes and alms-food,
lodging,
medicines
and requisites in [28] sickness.

Then it occurs to some recluse or brahmin:

'0 that this reverend one
had not a good supply of robes and alms-food,
lodging,
medicines
and requisites in sickness!'

This, monks, is called wrongful envy.

That is to be abandoned
neither with body nor in speech,
but on seeing it by insight.

 

§

 

Wrongful longing, monks, is to be abandoned
neither with body
nor in speech,
but on seeing it by insight.

And of what sort, monks, is wrongful longing?

Herein a certain unbeliever
longs to be known for a believer;
being immoral,
he longs to be known for one of virtue;
being one who has heard little,
he longs to be known for one who has heard much;
delighting in society,
he longs to be known as one given to seclusion;
slothful,
he longs to be known as one of ardent energy;
scatter-brained,
he longs to be known as one of concentrated mind;
discomposed,
he longs to be known as composed;
weak in wisdom,
he longs to be known as strong in wisdom;
not having destroyed the cankers,
he longs to be known as one who has done so.

This, monks, is called wrongful longing.

That is to be abandoned
neither with body nor in speech,
but on seeing it by insight.

 

§

 

Now if lust overwhelms that monk
and has its way,
then he should be regarded thus:

'This venerable one understands not
how lust ceases to be
in him who understands.

Thus does lust overwhelm his reverence
and has its way.'

Now if malice overwhelms that monk
and has its way,
then he should be regarded thus:

'This venerable one understands not
how malice ceases to be
in him who understands.

Thus does malice overwhelm his reverence
and has its way.'

Now if delusion overwhelms that monk
and has its way,
then he should be regarded thus:

'This venerable one understands not
how delusion ceases to be
in him who understands.

Thus does delusion overwhelm his reverence
and has its way.'

Now if wrath overwhelms that monk
and has its way,
then he should be regarded thus:

'This venerable one understands not
how lust wrath to be
in him who understands.

Thus does wrath overwhelm his reverence
and has its way.'

Now if grudge overwhelms that monk
and has its way,
then he should be regarded thus:

'This venerable one understands not
how grudge ceases to be
in him who understands.

Thus does grudge overwhelm his reverence
and has its way.'

Now if depreciation overwhelms that monk
and has its way,
then he should be regarded thus:

'This venerable one understands not
how depreciation ceases to be
in him who understands.

Thus does depreciation overwhelm his reverence
and has its way.'

Now if spite overwhelms that monk
and has its way,
then he should be regarded thus:

'This venerable one understands not
how spite ceases to be
in him who understands.

Thus does spite overwhelm his reverence
and has its way.'

Now if selfishness overwhelms that monk
and has its way,
then he should be regarded thus:

'This venerable one understands not
how selfishness ceases to be
in him who understands.

Thus does selfishness overwhelm his reverence
and has its way.'

Now if wrongful envy overwhelm that monk and have their way,
then he should be regarded thus:

'This venerable one understands not how
wrongful envy ceases to be
in him who understands.

Thus does wrongful envy overwhelm his reverence
and has its way.'

 

§

 

But if lust overwhelms not that monk
and has not its way,
then he should be regarded thus:

'This venerable one understands
how lust ceases to be
in him who understands.

Thus it is that lust overwhelms him not,
has not its way.'

Now if malice overwhelms not that monk
and has not its way,
then he should be regarded thus:

'This venerable one understands
how malice ceases to be
in him who understands.

Thus it is that malice overwhelms him not,
has not its way.'

Now if delusion overwhelms not that monk
and has not its way,
then he should be regarded thus:

'This venerable one understands
how delusion ceases to be
in him who understands.

Thus it is that delusion overwhelms him not,
has not its way.'

Now if wrath overwhelms not that monk
and has not its way,
then he should be regarded thus:

'This venerable one understands
how lust wrath to be
in him who understands.

Thus it is that wrath overwhelms him not,
has not its way.'

Now if grudge overwhelms not that monk
and has not its way,
then he should be regarded thus:

'This venerable one understands
how grudge ceases to be
in him who understands.

Thus it is that grudge overwhelms him not,
has not its way.'

Now if depreciation overwhelms not that monk
and has not its way,
then he should be regarded thus:

'This venerable one understands
how depreciation ceases to be
in him who understands.

Thus it is that depreciation overwhelms him not,
has not its way.'

Now if spite overwhelms not that monk
and has not its way,
then he should be regarded thus:

'This venerable one understands
how spite ceases to be
in him who understands.

Thus it is that spite overwhelms him not,
has not its way.'

Now if selfishness overwhelms not that monk
and has not its way,
then he should be regarded thus:

'This venerable one understands
how selfishness ceases to be
in him who understands.

Thus it is that selfishness overwhelms him not,
has not its way.'

Now if wrongful envy overwhelm not that monk and have not their way,
then he should be regarded thus:

'This venerable one understands
how wrongful envy ceases to be
in him who understands.

Thus it is that wrongful envy overwhelms him not,
has not its way.'

 


? Sharecropper.

p.p. explains it all — p.p.

[1] Upavāsa. See remarks by Dr. E. H. Johnston in J.R.A.S., July, 1931, p. 575. It appears to be used in Skt. in the sense of 'undertenant of a field,' probably of the semi-servile class known as ardhasītika.


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