Aŋguttara Nikāya


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Aŋguttara Nikāya
X. Dasaka-Nipāta
VI. Sa-Citta Vagga

The Book of the Gradual Sayings
X. The Book of the Tens
VI: One's Own Thoughts

Sutta 54

Samatha Suttaɱ

Peace of Heart

Translated from the Pali by F. L. Woodward, M.A.

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[98] [68]

[1][than][bodh]Thus have I heard:

Once the Exalted One was dwelling near Sāvatthī,
at Jeta Grove,
in Anāthapiṇḍika's Park.

There the Exalted One addressed the monks, saying:

"Monks."

"Yes, lord," they replied, and the Exalted One said:

"Monks, though a monk be not skilled
in the habit of others' thoughts,
at least he can resolve:

'I will be skilled
in the habit of my own thought.'

Thus, monks, should ye train yourselves.

 

§

 

And how is a monk skilled
in the habit of his own thought?

Just as if, monks, a woman or man or a young lad
fond of self-adornment,[ed1]
examining the reflection of his own face
in a bright clean mirror
or bowl of clear water,
should see therein a stain
or speck
and strive for the removal of that stain
or speck;
and when he no longer sees it there
is pleased and satisfied thereat, thinking:

'A gain it is to me that I am clean' -
even so a monk's introspection
is most fruitful in good conditions, thus:

'Am I or am I not
a winner of peace of heart in my own self?

Am I or am I not
a winner of insight of the higher
and insight into Dhamma?'

If, monks, on self-examination a monk knows thus:

'I am a winner of peace of heart in my own self,
but not a winner of wisdom of the higher
and insight into Dhamma' -
then he [69] must put forth effort
to establish peace of heart in his own self
and acquire insight of the higher
and insight into Dhamma.

Then on some later occasion
he is a winner of both alike.

If, however, on self-examination a monk knows thus:

'I am a winner of insight of the higher
and insight into Dhamma,
but not of peace of heart in my own self' -
then he must make an effort
to establish insight of the higher
and insight into Dhamma,

and acquire peace of heart in his own self.

Then on some later occasion he is winner of both alike.

But if on self-examination a monk knows thus:

'I am not a winner of either quality,'
then he must put forth extra desire,
effort,
endeavour,
exertion,
unflagging mindfulness
and attention
for the acquiring
of those profitable conditions.

Just as, monks, when one's turban or head is ablaze,[1]
for the extinguishing thereof
one must put forth extra desire,
effort,
endeavour,
exertion,
unflagging mindfulness
and attention,
even so for acquiring of those profitable conditions
one must put forth extra desire,
effort,
endeavour,
exertion,
impulse,
unflagging mindfulness
and attention
for acquiring of those profitable conditions.

Then [100] at some future time
he is a winner both of peace of heart in his own self
and insight of the higher
and insight into Dhamma.

If, however, on self-examination
a monk finds that he has both qualities,
then he must make an effort
to establish just those profitable conditions,
and further to destroy the cankers.

 

§

 

As to the robe, monks,
I declare that it is to be sought after
or not sought after in a twofold way.

As to alms-food, monks,
I declare that it is to be sought after
or not sought after in a twofold way.

As to bed and lodging, monks,
I declare that it is to be sought after
or not sought after in a twofold way.

As to village and township, monks,
I declare that it is to be sought after
or not sought after in a twofold way.

As to countryside and district, monks,
I declare that it is to be sought after
or not sought after in a twofold way.

As to a person, monks,
I declare that it is to be sought after
or not sought after in a twofold way.

 

§

 

Now I spoke of the robe being sought after or not sought after in a twofold way.

Why was this said?

In this matter if one know:

'By seeking after this sort of robe[2]
unprofitable states wax in me
and profitable states wane in me' -
then such a robe is not to be sought after.

But if one know:

'By seeking after this robe
unprofitable states wane in me
and profitable states wax in me' -
such robe should be sought after.

That, monks, is why I said this about the robe.

Now I spoke of [101] alms-food being sought after or not sought after in a twofold way.

Why was this said?

In this matter if one know:

'By seeking after this sort of alms-food
unprofitable states wax in me
and profitable states wane in me' -
then such alms-food is not to be sought after.

But if one know:

'By seeking after this alms-food
unprofitable states wane in me
and profitable states wax in me' -
such alms-food should be sought after.

That, monks, is why I said this about alms-food.

Now I spoke of bed and lodging being sought after or not sought after in a twofold way.

Why was this said?

In this matter if one know:

'By seeking after this sort of bed and lodging
unprofitable states wax in me
and profitable states wane in me' -
then such bed and lodging is not to be sought after.

But if one know:

'By seeking after this bed and lodging
unprofitable states wane in me
and profitable states wax in me' -
such bed and lodging should be sought after.

That, monks, is why I said this about bed and lodging.

Now I spoke of village and township being sought after or not sought after in a twofold way.

Why was this said?

In this matter if one know:

'By seeking after this sort of village and township
unprofitable states wax in me
and profitable states wane in me' -
then such village and township is not to be sought after.

But if one know:

'By seeking after this village and township
unprofitable states wane in me
and profitable states wax in me' -
such village and township should be sought after.

That, monks, is why I said this about village and township.

Now I spoke of countryside and district being sought after or not sought after in a twofold way.

Why was this said?

In this matter if one know:

'By seeking after this sort of countryside and district
unprofitable states wax in me
and profitable states wane in me' -
then such countryside and district is not to be sought after.

But if one know:

'By seeking after this countryside and district
unprofitable states wane in me
and profitable states wax in me' -
such countryside and district should be sought after.

That, monks, is why I said this about countryside and district.

Now I spoke of [102] a person being sought after or not sought after in a twofold way.

Why was this said?

In this matter if one know:

'By seeking after this sort of a person
unprofitable states wax in me
and profitable states wane in me' -
then such a person is not to be sought after.

But if one know:

'By seeking after this person
unprofitable states wane in me
and profitable states wax in me' -
such a person should be sought after.

That, monks, is why I said this about a person.

 


[1] Cf. K.S. i, 19; 136.

[2] This § occurs at A. iv, 366 ff.

 


[ed1] Woodward's abridgment would indicate that the list of qualities found in the previous sutta is repeated here. The PTS and BJT Pali texts do not indicate any abridgment here and to include this list would not fit the construction. It could be done as a 'wheel' in which case the 'formula' would need to be repeated for each quality accumulating the previous qualities for the first condition in each case. Bhk. Bodhi has used three different versions of the Pali text and has the construction as here.


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