Aŋguttara Nikāya


[Home]  [Sutta Indexes]  [Glossology]  [Site Sub-Sections]


 

Aŋguttara Nikāya
X. Dasaka-Nipāta
VI. Sa-Citta Vagga

The Book of the Gradual Sayings
X. The Book of the Tens
VI: One's Own Thoughts

Sutta 59

Pabbajjā Suttaɱ

Forthgoing

Translated from the Pali by F. L. Woodward, M.A.

Copyright The Pali Text Society
Commercial Rights Reserved
Creative Commons Licence
For details see Terms of Use.

 


[107] [73]

[1][bodh] Thus have I heard:

Once the Exalted One was dwelling near Sāvatthī.

There the Exalted One addressed the monks, saying:

"Monks."

"Yes, lord," they replied,
and the Exalted One said:

"Wherefore, monks, thus must ye train yourselves:

Our thought shall be compassed about
as it was when we went forth (from home);[1]

evil, unprofitable states arising
shall not overpower our thought
and abide therein;

[1] compassed about with the idea of impermanence
shall our thought become;

[2] compassed about with the idea of the not-self,

[3] with the idea of the foul,

[4] with the idea of the danger (in things)
shall our thought become;

[5] learning the straight way
and the crooked way in the world[2]
our thought shall be compassed about by the idea of that;

[6] learning the composition and decomposition of the world
our thought shall be compassed about with that idea;

[7] knowing the origin and the ending of the world
our thought shall be compassed about by that idea;

[8] with the idea of abandoning,

[9] of fading interest,

[10] of making it to cease
shall our thoughts be compassed about.

Thus, monks, must ye train yourselves.

 

§

 

[108]And when a monk's thought is thus compassed about
as at his forthgoing,

and when evil, unprofitable states arising
do not overpower his thought
and abide therein;

and when his thought becomes compassed about
with the idea of impermanence

and when his thoughts become compassed about
with the idea of the not-self,

with the idea of the foul,

with the idea of the danger (in things)

and when his thoughts become compassed about
by learning the straight way
and the crooked way in the world

and when his thoughts become compassed about
by learning the composition
and decomposition of the world

and when his thoughts become compassed about
by knowing the origin and the ending of the world

and when his thoughts become compassed about
by the idea of abandoning,
of fading interest,
of making it to cease

one of two fruits is to be looked for in him -
either gnosis in this same visible state or,
if there be any remnant,
the fruit of not-returning.'

 


[1] Yāthā-pabbajja-paricitaɱ = vaḍḍhitaɱ, Comy. UdA. 323 equal to samantato citā (heaped up sill round), suvaḍḍhita. At A. iv, 402, paññāya cittaɱ paricitaɱ = cittācāra-pariyāyena cito vaḍḍhito, Comy.

[2] Lokassa samñ ca visamañ ca = satta-lokassa sucarita-duccaritāni, Comy.


Contact:
E-mail
Copyright Statement