Aŋguttara Nikāya


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Aŋguttara Nikāya
X. Dasaka-Nipāta
VII. Yamaka Vagga

The Book of the Gradual Sayings
X. The Book of the Tens
VII: The Pairs

Sutta 66

Dutiya Sukha Suttaɱ

Weal and Woe (b)

Translated from the Pali by F. L. Woodward, M.A.

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[82]

[1][than] Thus have I heard:

Once the venerable Sāriputta was staying among the Magadhese at Nālakagāmaka.

Now the Wanderer Sāmaṇḍakāni came to see the venerable Sāriputta,
and on coming to him greeted him courteously and,
after the exchange of courtesies and reminiscent talk,
sat down at one side.

So seated he said:

"Pray, Sāriputta, your reverence,
in this Dhamma-discipline
what is weal and what is woe?"

"Your reverence, when there is discontent
this woe may be looked for:

Whether one goes,
stands,
sits,
or lies,
he reaches not happiness and pleasure.

Whether he has gone to the forest,
to the root of a tree,
to a lonely place,
to life in the open air,
to life amid the monks,
he reaches not happiness and pleasure.

Where there is discontent,
this woe may be looked for.

 

§

 

Where there is content, your reverence,
this weal may be looked for:

Whether one goes,
stands,
sits
or lies,
he reaches happiness and pleasure.

Whether he has gone to the forest,
to the root of a tree,
to a lonely place,
to a life in the open air
or life amid the monks,
he reaches happiness and pleasure.

Where there is content, your reverence,
this weal may be looked for."


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