Aŋguttara Nikāya


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Aŋguttara Nikāya
X. Dasaka-Nipāta
VIII: Ākaŋkha-Vagga

The Book of the Gradual Sayings
X. The Book of the Tens
VIII: On Wishes

Sutta 77

Kāka Suttaɱ

The Crow

Translated from the Pali by F. L. Woodward, M.A.

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[101]

[1] Thus have I heard:

Once the Exalted One was dwelling near Sāvatthī.

There the Exalted One addressed the monks, saying:

"Monks."

"Yes, lord," they replied, and the Exalted One said:

"Monks, the crow is possessed of ten qualities contrary to Dhamma.

What ten?

It is truculent[1],
and pushing,
greedy,
and a gross feeder,
cruel,
and pitiless,
clumsy,[2],
of harsh voice,[3]
muddle-headed
and a hoarder of treasure.[4]

A crow is possessed of these ten qualities contrary to Dhamma.

 

§

 

In like manner
a wicked monk
is possessed of ten qualities contrary to Dhamma.

What ten?

He is truculent,
and pushing,
greedy,
and a gross feeder,
cruel,
and pitiless,
clumsy,
of harsh voice,
muddle-headed
and a hoarder of treasure.

 


[1] Dhaŋsī; cf. Dhp. 244 kāka-sūrena, dhaŋsinā ... pagabbhena.

Dubbala. Badly balanced. Awkward. Inept.

p.p. explains it all — p.p.

[2] Dubbala in its usual sense of 'feeble' cannot be applied to a crow.

[3] Oravitā = orava-yutto, oravanto carati, Comy. The word seems to occur nowhere else, P. Dict. doubts derivation, but suggests oravitarati. But it is evidently a lengthened form of avaravati, to croak.

[4] Necayiko = nicaya-karo, Comy.


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