Aŋguttara Nikāya


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Aŋguttara Nikāya
X. Dasaka-Nipāta
VIII: Ākaŋkha-Vagga

The Book of the Gradual Sayings
X. The Book of the Tens
VIII: On Wishes

Sutta 79

Āghāta-Vatthu Suttaɱ

Occasions of Ill-will

Translated from the Pali by F. L. Woodward, M.A.

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[102]

[1] Thus have I heard:

Once the Exalted One was dwelling near Sāvatthī.

There the Exalted One addressed the monks, saying:

"Monks."

"Yes, lord," they replied, and the Exalted One said:

"Monks, there are these ten occasions of ill-will.[1]

What ten?

One conceives ill-will at the thought:

[1] 'So-and-so has done me harm;
[2] he is doing me harm;
[3] he is going to do me harm.'[2]

One conceives ill-will at the thought:

[4] 'So-and-so has done harm to one dear and precious to me;
[5] he is doing harm,
[6] he is going to do harm
to one dear and precious to me.'

One conceives ill-will at the thought:

[7] 'So-and-so has done good
to one not dear and precious to me:
[8] he is doing good,
[9] he is going to do good
to one not dear and precious to me.'

[10] And[ed1] one is groundlessly annoyed.

These are the ten occasions of ill-will."

 


[1] Aghāta-. Five at A. iii, 185.

[2] As at Dhs. § 1060 = Buddh. Psych. Eth. 282.

 


[ed1] Woodward has "Thus" which would indicate that this was a conclusion based on the previous nine and this would leave us with only nine factors. The Pali reads "and": "aṭṭhāne ca." Bhk. Bodhi footnotes with the explanation that this has to do with getting angry when one stubs one's toe on a rock and such things as are not intentional affliction-inflictions.


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