Aŋguttara Nikāya


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Aŋguttara Nikāya
X. Dasaka-Nipāta
IX: Thera-Vagga

The Book of the Gradual Sayings
X. The Book of the Tens
IX: The Elders

Sutta 87

Adhikaraṇika Suttaɱ

Kālaka the Monk

Translated from the Pali by F. L. Woodward, M.A.

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[110]

[1] THUS have I heard:

Once the Exalted One was dwelling near Sāvatthī.

On that occasion,
concerning Kālaka[1] the monk,
the Exalted One called to the monks, saying:

"Monks!"

"Yes, sir," replied those monks to the Exalted One,
who said this:

"In this matter, monks,
we have a monk who is disputatious,[2]
who speaks not in favour of calming disputes.

In so far as he is disputatious,
who speaks not in favour of calming disputes,
this state of things[3] conduces not to dearness,
to respect,
to cultivation,[4]
to accord
and oneness.

[165] Then again a monk is not fond of the training,
speaks not in favour of undergoing the training.

In so far as he is not fond of the training,
who speaks not in favour of undergoing the training,
this state of things conduces not to dearness,
to respect,
to cultivation,
to accord
and oneness.

Again a monk is of evil desires,
no speaker in favour of restraint of desires.

In so far as he is of evil desires,
who speaks not in favour of restraint of desires,
this state of things conduces not to dearness,
to respect,
to cultivation,
to accord
and oneness.

Again a monk is wrathful,
no speaker in favour of restraint of wrath.

In so far as he is wrathful,
who speaks not in favour of restraint of wrath,
this state of things conduces not to dearness,
to respect,
to cultivation,
to accord
and oneness.

Again a monk is disparaging,
no speaker in favour of restraint of disparagement.

In so far as he is disparaging,
who speaks not in favour of restraint of disparagement,
this state of things conduces not to dearness,
to respect,
to cultivation,
to accord
and oneness.

Again a monk is crafty,
no speaker in favour of restraint of craftiness.

In so far as he is crafty,
who speaks not in favour of restraint of craftiness,
this state of things conduces not to dearness,
to respect,
to cultivation,
to accord
and oneness.

Again a monk is a deceiver,
no speaker in favour of restraint of deceit.

In so far as he is deceiver,
who speaks not in favour of restraint of deceit,
this state of things conduces not to dearness,
to respect,
to cultivation,
to accord
and oneness.

Again a monk [166] is by nature unobservant[5] of teachings,
[111] speaks not in favour of observing teachings.

In so far as he is by nature unobservant of teachings,
who speaks not in favour of observing teachings,
this state of things conduces not to dearness,
to respect,
to cultivation,
to accord
and oneness.

Again a monk is not given to seclusion
speaks not in favour of seclusion.

In so far as he is not given to seclusion,
who speaks not in favour of seclusion,
this state of things conduces not to dearness,
to respect,
to cultivation,
to accord
and oneness.

Again a monk does not kindly welcome his fellows in the Brahma-life,
speaks not in favour of welcoming kindly.

In so far as he does not kindly welcome his fellows in the Brahma-life,
who speaks not in favour of welcoming kindly,
this state of things conduces not to dearness,
to respect,
to cultivation,
to accord
and oneness.

In such a monk, however much this longing arises:

'0 that my fellows in the Brahma-life
would honour,
respect,
appreciate
and show deference to me!' -

yet his fellows in the Brahma-life neither honour,
respect,
appreciate
nor show deference to him.

What is the cause of that?

Because his discerning fellows in the Brahma-life
observe that those bad,
unprofitable qualities
are not abandoned in him.

Just as if, monks,
in an unbroken colt[6]
however much this longing should arise:

'0 that men would set me in the place of a trained thoroughbred,
feed me with a thoroughbred's food
and groom me with the grooming of a thoroughbred!' -

yet men put him not in the place of a thoroughbred,
feed him not with a thoroughbred's food,
groom him not with the grooming of a thoroughbred.

[167] Why not?

Because discerning men observe
that those crafty,
roguish tricks,
those swervings
and crooked ways of his
are not abandoned.[7]

Even so, monks, however much this longing may arise in such a monk:

'O that my fellows in the Brahma-life would honour,
respect,
appreciate
and show deference to me! -

yet his fellows in the Brahma-life do none of these things.

Why not?

Because, monks, his discerning fellows in the Brahma-life
observe that those qualities are not abandoned in him.

 

§

 

Now, monks, suppose we have a monk who is not disputatious,
but who speaks in favour of calming disputes.

In so far as he is not disputatious,
but speaks in favour of calming disputes,
this state of things conduces to dearness,
respect,
cultivation,
to accord
and oneness.

[112] Then again he is fond of the training,
speaks in favour of undergoing the training.

In so far as he is fond of the training,
but speaks in favour of undergoing the training,
this state of things conduces to dearness,
respect,
cultivation,
to accord
and oneness.

Then again he has small desires,
speaks in favour of restraint of desires.

In so far as he has small desires,
but speaks in favour of restraint of desires,
this state of things conduces to dearness,
respect,
cultivation,
to accord
and oneness.

Then again he is not wrathful,
speaks in favour of restraining wrath.

In so far as he is not wrathful,
but speaks in favour of restraint of wrath,
this state of things conduces to dearness,
respect,
cultivation,
to accord
and oneness.

Then again he is not disparaging,
speaks in favour of restraining disparagement.

In so far as he is not disparaging,
but speaks in favour of restraining disparagement,
this state of things conduces to dearness,
respect,
cultivation,
to accord
and oneness.

Then again he [168] is not crafty
speaks in favour of restraining craftiness.

In so far as he is not crafty,
but speaks in favour of restraining craftiness,
this state of things conduces to dearness,
respect,
cultivation,
to accord
and oneness.

Then again he is no deceiver
speaks in favour of restraining deceit.

In so far as he is no deceiver,
but speaks in favour of restraining deceit,
this state of things conduces to dearness,
respect,
cultivation,
to accord
and oneness.

Then again he is by nature observant of teachings,
speaks in favour of observing teachings.

In so far as he is by nature observant of teachings,
but speaks in favour of observing teachings,
this state of things conduces to dearness,
respect,
cultivation,
to accord
and oneness.

Then again he is given to seclusion,
speaks in favour of seclusion.

In so far as he given to seclusion,
but speaks in favour of seclusion,
this state of things conduces to dearness,
respect,
cultivation,
to accord
and oneness.

Then again he kindly welcomes his fellows in the Brahma-life,
speaks in favour of kindly welcoming one's fellows in the Brahma-life.

In so far as he kindly welcomes his fellows in the Brahma-life,
but speaks in favour of seclusion,
this state of things conduces to dearness,
respect,
cultivation,
to accord
and oneness.

In such a monk,although no such longing arises as:

'0 that my fellows in the Brahma-life would honour,
respect,
appreciate
and show deference to me!' -

yet his fellows in the Brahma-life do honour,
do respect,
appreciate,
do show deference to him.

Why so?

Because, monks, his discerning fellows in the Brahma-life
observe that in him those wicked,
unprofitable qualities
are abandoned.

Just as if, monks, such longing as this should arise in a first-rate[8] thoroughbred steed:

'0 that men would put me in the place of a thoroughbred,
feed me with a thoroughbred's food,
groom me with a thoroughbred's grooming! -

yet men do all these things to him.

[169] Why so?

Because discerning men
observe that in him
those crafty,
roguish tricks,
those swervings
and crooked ways
are abandoned.

In the same way, monks,
although no such desire arise in a monk as:

'0 that my fellows in the Brahma-life would honour,
respect,
appreciate
and show deference to me!' -

yet his fellows in the Brahma-life do honour,
do respect,
appreciate,
do show deference to him.

Why so?

Because in their discernment
they observe that those wicked,
unprofitable qualities
are abandoned in him."

 


[1] The uddāna of text has no title for this and next sutta, but one MS. has what I have given. Neither Comy. nor Ang. Index notices the name Kālaka, and I have not found it elsewhere. Text gives several variants; perhaps it is due to a confusion with Kokālika of § ix.

[2] Adhikaraṇika. Taken by P.E.D. as 'judge in a dispute,' but by Comy. as 'disputatious.'

[3] Dhamma.

[4] Bhāvanāya, in the sense of cultivating one's acquaintance. Cf. sevitabba, bhajitabba, bhāvitabba.

[5] Nisāmaka-jātiyo (? -jātiko) = na upadhāraṇa-sabhāvo, Comy. Cf. G.S. ii, 106; A. iv, 296 (Comy. sīghaɱ jānituɱ asamattho).

[6] Cf. A. i, 287 = G.S. i, 266 = A. iv, 397. Comy. assakalunkha = assa-pota. Below, XI, x.

[7] At M. i, 340 of the young elephant.

[8] Bhadda.


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