Samyutta Nikaya Masthead


[Home]  [Sutta Indexes]  [Glossology]  [Site Sub-Sections]


 

Saɱyutta Nikāya
4. Saḷāyatana Vagga
35. Saḷāyatana Saɱyutta
§ III: Paññāsaka Tatiya
1. Yoga-k-Khemi Vagga

The Book of the Kindred Sayings
4. The Book Called the Saḷāyatana-Vagga
Containing Kindred Sayings on the 'Six-Fold Sphere' of Sense and Other Subjects
35. Kindred Sayings the Sixfold Sphere of Sense
§ III: The 'Third Fifty' Suttas
1. The Chapter on Winning Security

Sutta 104

Yoga-k-Khemi Suttaɱ

Winner of Security[1]

Translated by F. L. Woodward
Edited by Mrs. Rhys Davids

Copyright The Pali Text Society
Commercial Rights Reserved
Creative Commons Licence
For details see Terms of Use.

 


[85] [51]

[1][bodh][olds] Thus have I heard:

The Exalted One once staying near Sāvatthī.

Then the Exalted One addressed the brethren, saying:

"Brethren."

"Lord," responded those brethren to the Exalted One.

The Exalted One thus spake:

"I will teach you, Brethren,
the method of winning security from the yoke,
the method of the Norm.

Do ye listen to it.

And what, Brethren, is the method
of winning security from the yokes?

There are, Brethren,
objects cognizable by the eye,
objects desirable,
pleasant,
delightful
and dear,
passion-fraught,
inciting to lust.

They have been abandoned by the Tathāgata,
cut down at the root,
made like a palm-tree stump,
made something that has ceased to be,
so that they cannot grow up again in future time.

For the abandoning of them
he has proclaimed the yoke.[2]

Therefore is the Tathāgata, called
'winner of security from the yokes.'

There are, Brethren,
sounds cognizable by the ear,
sounds desirable,
pleasant,
delightful
and dear,
passion-fraught,
inciting to lust.

They have been abandoned by the Tathāgata,
cut down at the root,
made like a palm-tree stump,
made something that has ceased to be,
so that they cannot grow up again in future time.

For the abandoning of them
he has proclaimed the yoke.

Therefore is the Tathāgata, called
'winner of security from the yokes.'

There are, Brethren,
scents cognizable by the nose,
scents desirable,
pleasant,
delightful
and dear,
passion-fraught,
inciting to lust.

They have been abandoned by the Tathāgata,
cut down at the root,
made like a palm-tree stump,
made something that has ceased to be,
so that they cannot grow up again in future time.

For the abandoning of them
he has proclaimed the yoke.

Therefore is the Tathāgata, called
'winner of security from the yokes.'

There are, Brethren,
savours cognizable by the tongue,
savours desirable,
pleasant,
delightful
and dear,
passion-fraught,
inciting to lust.

They have been abandoned by the Tathāgata,
cut down at the root,
made like a palm-tree stump,
made something that has ceased to be,
so that they cannot grow up again in future time.

For the abandoning of them
he has proclaimed the yoke.

Therefore is the Tathāgata, called
'winner of security from the yokes.'

There are, Brethren,
tangibles cognizable by the body,
tangibles desirable,
pleasant,
delightful
and dear,
passion-fraught,
inciting to lust.

They have been abandoned by the Tathāgata,
cut down at the root,
made like a palm-tree stump,
made something that has ceased to be,
so that they cannot grow up again in future time.

For the abandoning of them
he has proclaimed the yoke.

Therefore is the Tathāgata, called
'winner of security from the yokes.'

There are, Brethren,
mind-states cognizable by the mind,
mind-states desirable,
pleasant,
delightful
and dear,
passion-fraught,
inciting to lust.

They have been abandoned by the Tathāgata,
cut down at the root,
made like a palm-tree stump,
made something that has ceased to be,
so that they cannot grow up again in future time.

For the abandoning of them
he has proclaimed the yoke.

Therefore is the Tathāgata, called
'winner of security from the yokes.'

This Brethren, is the method of winning security from the yokes,
the method of the Norm.

 


Appendix 203. There is no appendix in this volume, but there is an Index called Pali Words Discussed in Commentary or Footnotes, which has, on page 203, the following: 'Yoga-k-khema, p. 132 = arahattaŋ. for that is 'uttermost' and is safe from the four 'yokes' (or bonds, harnessing man to the Faring-on: — sensuality, renewed life, opinion, ignorance).

p.p. explains it all — p.p.

[1] Yoga-khema-pariyāya. Cf. K.S. ii, 132 and Appendix, 203. It is (not 'the security or peace of yoga' [as a Hindu would understand the word], but) security from the four bonds or yokes of kāma, bhava, diṭṭhi, avijjā. Comy.

[2] Here yoga seems to be used in the sense of application or effort. Tasmā, 'not because he has proclaimed, but because he has abandoned.' Comy.


Contact:
E-mail
Copyright Statement