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Saɱyutta Nikāya,
V: Mahā-Vagga
50. Bala Saɱyutta
I. Gŋgā-Peyyālo

Kindred Sayings
V: The Great Chapter
50. Kindred Sayings on the Powers
I. Gaŋgā Repetition

Suttas 1-12

Translated by F. L. Woodward
Edited by Mrs. Rhys Davids

Copyright The Pali Text Society
Commercial Rights Reserved
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For details see Terms of Use.

 


 

Sutta 1

Paṭhama Pācīna Suttaɱ

Eastward (a)

[1] THUS have I heard:

Once the Exalted One was staying near Sāvatthī.

Then the Exalted One addressed the monks,
saying:

"Monks."

"Yes, lord," replied those monks to the Exalted One.

The Exalted One said:

Monks, there are these five powers.

Of what sort are the five?

They are:
The power of faith,
the power of energy,
the power of mindfulness,
the power of concentration,
the power of insight.

These are the five powers.

Just as, monks, the river Ganges
flows,
slides
and tends to the East,
even so a monk who cultivates
and makes much of
these five powers
flows,
slides,
tends to Nibbāna.

And how, monks, by cultivating
and making much of
the five powers
does a monk flow,
slide
and tend to Nibbāna?

Herein a monk cultivates the power of faith
based on seclusion,
on dispassion,
on cessation,
which ends in self-surrender.

He cultivates the power of energy
based on seclusion,
on dispassion,
on cessation,
which ends in self-surrender.

He cultivates the power of mindfulness
based on seclusion,
on dispassion,
on cessation,
which ends in self-surrender.

He cultivates the power of concentration
based on seclusion,
on dispassion,
on cessation,
which ends in self-surrender.

He cultivates the power of insight
based on seclusion,
on dispassion,
on cessation,
which ends in self-surrender.

Thus cultivating,
thus making much of
the five powers
a monk flows,
slides
and tends to Nibbāna.

 


 

Sutta 2

Dutiya Pācīna Suttaɱ

Eastward (b.1)

[2] THUS have I heard:

Once the Exalted One was staying near Sāvatthī.

Then the Exalted One addressed the monks,
saying:

"Monks."

"Yes, lord," replied those monks to the Exalted One.

The Exalted One said:

Monks, there are these five powers.

Of what sort are the five?

They are:
The power of faith,
the power of energy,
the power of mindfulness,
the power of concentration,
the power of insight.

These are the five powers.

Just as, monks, the river Yamunā
flows,
slides
and tends to the East,
even so a monk who cultivates
and makes much of
the five powers
flows,
slides,
tends to Nibbāna.

And how, monks, by cultivating
and making much of
the five powers
does a monk flow,
slide
and tend to Nibbāna?

Herein a monk cultivates the power of faith
based on seclusion,
on dispassion,
on cessation,
which ends in self-surrender.

He cultivates the power of energy
based on seclusion,
on dispassion,
on cessation,
which ends in self-surrender.

He cultivates the power of mindfulness
based on seclusion,
on dispassion,
on cessation,
which ends in self-surrender.

He cultivates the power of concentration
based on seclusion,
on dispassion,
on cessation,
which ends in self-surrender.

He cultivates the power of insight
based on seclusion,
on dispassion,
on cessation,
which ends in self-surrender.

Thus cultivating,
thus making much of
the five powers
a monk flows,
slides
and tends to Nibbāna.

 


 

Sutta 3

Tatiya Pācīna Suttaɱ

Eastward (b.2)

[3] THUS have I heard:

Once the Exalted One was staying near Sāvatthī.

Then the Exalted One addressed the monks,
saying:

"Monks."

"Yes, lord," replied those monks to the Exalted One.

The Exalted One said:

Monks, there are these five powers.

Of what sort are the five?

They are:
The power of faith,
the power of energy,
the power of mindfulness,
the power of concentration,
the power of insight.

These are the five powers.

Just as, monks, the river Acīravatī
flows,
slides
and tends to the East,
even so a monk who cultivates
and makes much of
the five powers
flows,
slides,
tends to Nibbāna.

And how, monks, by cultivating
and making much of
the five powers
does a monk flow,
slide
and tend to Nibbāna?

Herein a monk cultivates the power of faith
based on seclusion,
on dispassion,
on cessation,
which ends in self-surrender.

He cultivates the power of energy
based on seclusion,
on dispassion,
on cessation,
which ends in self-surrender.

He cultivates the power of mindfulness
based on seclusion,
on dispassion,
on cessation,
which ends in self-surrender.

He cultivates the power of concentration
based on seclusion,
on dispassion,
on cessation,
which ends in self-surrender.

He cultivates the power of insight
based on seclusion,
on dispassion,
on cessation,
which ends in self-surrender.

Thus cultivating,
thus making much of
the five powers
a monk flows,
slides
and tends to Nibbāna.

 


 

Sutta 4

Catuttha Pācīna Suttaɱ

Eastward (b.3)

[4] THUS have I heard:

Once the Exalted One was staying near Sāvatthī.

Then the Exalted One addressed the monks,
saying:

"Monks."

"Yes, lord," replied those monks to the Exalted One.

The Exalted One said:

Monks, there are these five powers.

Of what sort are the five?

They are:
The power of faith,
the power of energy,
the power of mindfulness,
the power of concentration,
the power of insight.

These are the five powers.

Just as, monks, the river Sarabhū
flows,
slides
and tends to the East,
even so a monk who cultivates
and makes much of
the five powers
flows,
slides,
tends to Nibbāna.

And how, monks, by cultivating
and making much of
the five powers
does a monk flow,
slide
and tend to Nibbāna?

Herein a monk cultivates the power of faith
based on seclusion,
on dispassion,
on cessation,
which ends in self-surrender.

He cultivates the power of energy
based on seclusion,
on dispassion,
on cessation,
which ends in self-surrender.

He cultivates the power of mindfulness
based on seclusion,
on dispassion,
on cessation,
which ends in self-surrender.

He cultivates the power of concentration
based on seclusion,
on dispassion,
on cessation,
which ends in self-surrender.

He cultivates the power of insight
based on seclusion,
on dispassion,
on cessation,
which ends in self-surrender.

Thus cultivating,
thus making much of
the five powers
a monk flows,
slides
and tends to Nibbāna.

 


 

Sutta 5

Pañcama Pācīna Suttaɱ

Eastward (b.4)

[5] THUS have I heard:

Once the Exalted One was staying near Sāvatthī.

Then the Exalted One addressed the monks,
saying:

"Monks."

"Yes, lord," replied those monks to the Exalted One.

The Exalted One said:

Monks, there are these five powers.

Of what sort are the five?

They are:
The power of faith,
the power of energy,
the power of mindfulness,
the power of concentration,
the power of insight.

These are the five powers.

Just as, monks, the river Mahī
flows,
slides
and tends to the East,
even so a monk who cultivates
and makes much of
the five powers
flows,
slides,
tends to Nibbāna.

And how, monks, by cultivating
and making much of
the five powers
does a monk flow,
slide
and tend to Nibbāna?

Herein a monk cultivates the power of faith
based on seclusion,
on dispassion,
on cessation,
which ends in self-surrender.

He cultivates the power of energy
based on seclusion,
on dispassion,
on cessation,
which ends in self-surrender.

He cultivates the power of mindfulness
based on seclusion,
on dispassion,
on cessation,
which ends in self-surrender.

He cultivates the power of concentration
based on seclusion,
on dispassion,
on cessation,
which ends in self-surrender.

He cultivates the power of insight
based on seclusion,
on dispassion,
on cessation,
which ends in self-surrender.

Thus cultivating,
thus making much of
the five powers
a monk flows,
slides
and tends to Nibbāna.

 


 

Sutta 6

Chaṭṭha Pācīna Suttaɱ

Eastward (c)

[6] THUS have I heard:

Once the Exalted One was staying near Sāvatthī.

Then the Exalted One addressed the monks,
saying:

"Monks."

"Yes, lord," replied those monks to the Exalted One.

The Exalted One said:

Monks, there are these five powers.

Of what sort are the five?

They are:
The power of faith,
the power of energy,
the power of mindfulness,
the power of concentration,
the power of insight.

These are the five powers.

Just as, monks, whatsoever great rivers there be,
such as the Ganges,
Yamunā,
Acīravatī,
Sarabhū
and Mahī,

all of them flow,
slide
and tend to the East,
even so a monk who cultivates
and makes much of
the five powers
flows,
slides,
tends to Nibbāna.

And how, monks, by cultivating
and making much of
the five powers
does a monk flow,
slide
and tend to Nibbāna?

Herein a monk cultivates the power of faith
based on seclusion,
on dispassion,
on cessation,
which ends in self-surrender.

He cultivates the power of energy
based on seclusion,
on dispassion,
on cessation,
which ends in self-surrender.

He cultivates the power of mindfulness
based on seclusion,
on dispassion,
on cessation,
which ends in self-surrender.

He cultivates the power of concentration
based on seclusion,
on dispassion,
on cessation,
which ends in self-surrender.

He cultivates the power of insight
based on seclusion,
on dispassion,
on cessation,
which ends in self-surrender.

Thus cultivating,
thus making much of
the five powers
a monk flows,
slides
and tends to Nibbāna.

 

§

 

Sutta 7

Paṭhama Samudda Suttaɱ

Ocean (a)

[7] THUS have I heard:

Once the Exalted One was staying near Sāvatthī.

Then the Exalted One addressed the monks,
saying:

"Monks."

"Yes, lord," replied those monks to the Exalted One.

The Exalted One said:

Monks, there are these five powers.

Of what sort are the five?

They are:
The power of faith,
the power of energy,
the power of mindfulness,
the power of concentration,
the power of insight.

These are the five powers.

Just as, monks, the river Ganges
flows,
slides
and tends to the ocean,
even so a monk who cultivates
and makes much of
the five powers
flows,
slides,
tends to Nibbāna.

And how, monks, by cultivating
and making much of
the five powers
does a monk flow,
slide
and tend to Nibbāna?

Herein a monk cultivates the power of faith
based on seclusion,
on dispassion,
on cessation,
which ends in self-surrender.

He cultivates the power of energy
based on seclusion,
on dispassion,
on cessation,
which ends in self-surrender.

He cultivates the power of mindfulness
based on seclusion,
on dispassion,
on cessation,
which ends in self-surrender.

He cultivates the power of concentration
based on seclusion,
on dispassion,
on cessation,
which ends in self-surrender.

He cultivates the power of insight
based on seclusion,
on dispassion,
on cessation,
which ends in self-surrender.

Thus cultivating,
thus making much of
the five powers
a monk flows,
slides
and tends to Nibbāna.

 


 

Sutta 8

Dutiya Samudda Suttaɱ

Ocean (b.1)

[8] THUS have I heard:

Once the Exalted One was staying near Sāvatthī.

Then the Exalted One addressed the monks,
saying:

"Monks."

"Yes, lord," replied those monks to the Exalted One.

The Exalted One said:

Monks, there are these five powers.

Of what sort are the five?

They are:
The power of faith,
the power of energy,
the power of mindfulness,
the power of concentration,
the power of insight.

These are the five powers.

Just as, monks, the river Yamunā
flows,
slides
and tends to the ocean,
even so a monk who cultivates
and makes much of
the five powers
flows,
slides,
tends to Nibbāna.

And how, monks, by cultivating
and making much of
the five powers
does a monk flow,
slide
and tend to Nibbāna?

Herein a monk cultivates the power of faith
based on seclusion,
on dispassion,
on cessation,
which ends in self-surrender.

He cultivates the power of energy
based on seclusion,
on dispassion,
on cessation,
which ends in self-surrender.

He cultivates the power of mindfulness
based on seclusion,
on dispassion,
on cessation,
which ends in self-surrender.

He cultivates the power of concentration
based on seclusion,
on dispassion,
on cessation,
which ends in self-surrender.

He cultivates the power of insight
based on seclusion,
on dispassion,
on cessation,
which ends in self-surrender.

Thus cultivating,
thus making much of
the five powers
a monk flows,
slides
and tends to Nibbāna.

 


 

Sutta 9

Tatiya Samudda Suttaɱ

Ocean (b.2)

[9] THUS have I heard:

Once the Exalted One was staying near Sāvatthī.

Then the Exalted One addressed the monks,
saying:

"Monks."

"Yes, lord," replied those monks to the Exalted One.

The Exalted One said:

Monks, there are these five powers.

Of what sort are the five?

They are:
The power of faith,
the power of energy,
the power of mindfulness,
the power of concentration,
the power of insight.

These are the five powers.

Just as, monks, the river Acīravatī
flows,
slides
and tends to the ocean,
even so a monk who cultivates
and makes much of
the five powers
flows,
slides,
tends to Nibbāna.

And how, monks, by cultivating
and making much of
the five powers
does a monk flow,
slide
and tend to Nibbāna?

Herein a monk cultivates the power of faith
based on seclusion,
on dispassion,
on cessation,
which ends in self-surrender.

He cultivates the power of energy
based on seclusion,
on dispassion,
on cessation,
which ends in self-surrender.

He cultivates the power of mindfulness
based on seclusion,
on dispassion,
on cessation,
which ends in self-surrender.

He cultivates the power of concentration
based on seclusion,
on dispassion,
on cessation,
which ends in self-surrender.

He cultivates the power of insight
based on seclusion,
on dispassion,
on cessation,
which ends in self-surrender.

Thus cultivating,
thus making much of
the five powers
a monk flows,
slides
and tends to Nibbāna.

 


 

Sutta 10

Catuttha Samudda Suttaɱ

Ocean (b.3)

[10] THUS have I heard:

Once the Exalted One was staying near Sāvatthī.

Then the Exalted One addressed the monks,
saying:

"Monks."

"Yes, lord," replied those monks to the Exalted One.

The Exalted One said:

Monks, there are these five powers.

Of what sort are the five?

They are:
The power of faith,
the power of energy,
the power of mindfulness,
the power of concentration,
the power of insight.

These are the five powers.

Just as, monks, the river Sarabhū
flows,
slides
and tends to the ocean,
even so a monk who cultivates
and makes much of
the five powers
flows,
slides,
tends to Nibbāna.

And how, monks, by cultivating
and making much of
the five powers
does a monk flow,
slide
and tend to Nibbāna?

Herein a monk cultivates the power of faith
based on seclusion,
on dispassion,
on cessation,
which ends in self-surrender.

He cultivates the power of energy
based on seclusion,
on dispassion,
on cessation,
which ends in self-surrender.

He cultivates the power of mindfulness
based on seclusion,
on dispassion,
on cessation,
which ends in self-surrender.

He cultivates the power of concentration
based on seclusion,
on dispassion,
on cessation,
which ends in self-surrender.

He cultivates the power of insight
based on seclusion,
on dispassion,
on cessation,
which ends in self-surrender.

Thus cultivating,
thus making much of
the five powers
a monk flows,
slides
and tends to Nibbāna.

 


 

Sutta 11

Pañcama Samudda Suttaɱ

Ocean (b.4)

[11] THUS have I heard:

Once the Exalted One was staying near Sāvatthī.

Then the Exalted One addressed the monks,
saying:

"Monks."

"Yes, lord," replied those monks to the Exalted One.

The Exalted One said:

Monks, there are these five powers.

Of what sort are the five?

They are:
The power of faith,
the power of energy,
the power of mindfulness,
the power of concentration,
the power of insight.

These are the five powers.

Just as, monks, the river Mahī
flows,
slides
and tends to the ocean,
even so a monk who cultivates
and makes much of
the five powers
flows,
slides,
tends to Nibbāna.

And how, monks, by cultivating
and making much of
the five powers
does a monk flow,
slide
and tend to Nibbāna?

Herein a monk cultivates the power of faith
based on seclusion,
on dispassion,
on cessation,
which ends in self-surrender.

He cultivates the power of energy
based on seclusion,
on dispassion,
on cessation,
which ends in self-surrender.

He cultivates the power of mindfulness
based on seclusion,
on dispassion,
on cessation,
which ends in self-surrender.

He cultivates the power of concentration
based on seclusion,
on dispassion,
on cessation,
which ends in self-surrender.

He cultivates the power of insight
based on seclusion,
on dispassion,
on cessation,
which ends in self-surrender.

Thus cultivating,
thus making much of
the five powers
a monk flows,
slides
and tends to Nibbāna.

 


 

Sutta 12

Chaṭṭha Samudda Suttaɱ

Ocean (c)

[12] THUS have I heard:

Once the Exalted One was staying near Sāvatthī.

Then the Exalted One addressed the monks,
saying:

"Monks."

"Yes, lord," replied those monks to the Exalted One.

The Exalted One said:

Monks, there are these five powers.

Of what sort are the five?

They are:
The power of faith,
the power of energy,
the power of mindfulness,
the power of concentration,
the power of insight.

These are the five powers.

Just as, monks, whatsoever great rivers there be,
such as the Ganges,
Yamunā,
Acīravatī,
Sarabhū
and Mahī,

all of them flow,
slide
and tend to the East,
even so a monk who cultivates
and makes much of
the five powers
flows,
slides,
tends to Nibbāna.

And how, monks, by cultivating
and making much of
the five powers
does a monk flow,
slide
and tend to Nibbāna?

Herein a monk cultivates the power of faith
based on seclusion,
on dispassion,
on cessation,
which ends in self-surrender.

He cultivates the power of energy
based on seclusion,
on dispassion,
on cessation,
which ends in self-surrender.

He cultivates the power of mindfulness
based on seclusion,
on dispassion,
on cessation,
which ends in self-surrender.

He cultivates the power of concentration
based on seclusion,
on dispassion,
on cessation,
which ends in self-surrender.

He cultivates the power of insight
based on seclusion,
on dispassion,
on cessation,
which ends in self-surrender.

Thus cultivating,
thus making much of
the five powers
a monk flows,
slides
and tends to Nibbāna.


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