Aŋguttara Nikāya


 

Aŋguttara-Nikāya
III. Tika Nipāta
II. Rathakāra Vagga

The Numerical Discourses of the Buddha
III. The Book of the Threes
II. The Cart Maker

Sutta 15

Rathakāra (Pacetana) Suttaɱ

Pacetana

Translated from the Pali by Bhikkhu Bodhi.

© 2012 Bhikkhu Bodhi
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[1][pts][than][upal] On one occasion the Blessed One was dwelling at Bārāṇasī in the deer park at Isipatana.

There the Blessed One addressed the bhikkhus:

"Bhikkhus!"

"Venerable sir!" those bhikkhus replied.

The Blessed One said this:

"Bhikkhus, in the past there was a king named Pacetana.

Then King Pacetana addressed a chariotmaker:

'Friend chariotmaker, six months from now there will be a battle.

Can you make me a new pair of wheels?'

"'I can, lord,' the chariotmaker replied.

After six months less six days the chariotmaker had finished one wheel.

King Pacetana then addressed the chariotmaker:

'Six days from now there will be a battle.

Is the new pair of wheels finished?'

[The chariotmaker replied:]

'In the past six months less six days, lord, I have finished one wheel.'

"'But, friend chariotmaker, can you finish a second wheel for me in the next six days?'

"'I can, lord,' the chariotmaker replied.

Then, over the next six days, the chariotmaker finished the second wheel.

He brought the new pair of wheels to King Pacetana and said:

'This is the new pair of wheels that I have made for you, lord.'

"'What is the difference, friend chariotmaker, between the wheel that took six months less six days to complete and the one that took six days to complete?

I do not see any difference between them.'

"'There is a difference, lord.

Observe the difference.'"

Then the chariotmaker rolled the wheel that took six days to finish.

It rolled as far as the impetus carried it, and then it wobbled and fell to the ground.

But the wheel that took six months less six days to finish rolled as far as the impetus carried it and then stood still as if fixed on an axle.

"[The king asked:]

'Why is it, friend chariotmaker, that the wheel that took six days to finish rolled as far as the impetus carried it, and then wobbled and fell to the ground, while the wheel that took six months less six days to finish rolled as far as the impetus carried it and then stood still as if fixed on an axle?'

"[The chariotmaker replied:]

'The wheel that took six days to finish, lord, has a rim that is crooked, faulty, and defective; spokes that are crooked, faulty, and defective; and a nave that is crooked, faulty, and defective.

For this reason, it rolled as far as the impetus carried it and then it wobbled and fell to the ground.

But the wheel that took six months less six days to finish has a rim without crookedness, faults, and defects; it has spokes without crookedness, faults, and defects; and it has a nave that is without without crookedness, faults, and defects.

For this reason, it rolled as far as the impetus carried it and then stood still as if fixed on an axle.'

"It may be, bhikkhus, that you think:

'On that occasion the chariotmaker was someone else.'

But you should not think in such a way.

On that occasion, I myself was the chariotmaker.

Then I was skilled in crookedness, faults, and defects in wood.

But now I am the Arahant, the Perfectly Enlightened One,

(1) skilled in crookedness, faults, and defects of the body;

(2) skilled in crookedness, faults, and defects of speech; and

(3) skilled in crookedness, faults, and defects of mind.

"Any bhikkhu or bhikkhunīwho has not abandoned crookedness, faults, and defects of the body, speech, and mind has fallen down from this Dhamma and discipline, just as the wheel that was finished in six days [fell to the ground].

"Any bhikkhu or bhikkhunīwho has abandoned crookedness, faults, and defects of the body, speech, and mind is established in this Dhamma and discipline, just as the wheel that was finished in six months less six days [remained standing].

"Therefore, bhikkhus, you should train yourselves thus:

'We will abandon crookedness, faults, and defects of the body; we will abandon crookedness, faults, and defects of speech; we will abandon crookedness, faults, and defects of the mind.'

It is in this way that you should train yourselves."


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