Aŋguttara Nikāya


 

Aŋguttara-Nikāya
III. Tika Nipāta
III. Puggala Vagga

The Numerical Discourses of the Buddha
III. The Book of the Threes
III. Persons

Sutta 29

Andha Suttaɱ

Blind

Translated from the Pali by Bhikkhu Bodhi.

© 2012 Bhikkhu Bodhi
Published by
Wisdom Publications
Boston, MA 02115

This work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivs 3.0 Unported License
Based on a work at http://www.wisdompubs.org/book/numerical-discourses-buddha
Permissions beyond the scope of this license may be available at http://www.wisdompubs.org/terms-use.

 


 

[1][pts] "Bhikkhus, there are these three kinds of persons found existing in the world.

What three?

The blind person, the one-eyed person, and the two-eyed person.

(1) "And what, bhikkhus, is the blind person?

Here, some person lacks the kind of eye with which one can acquire wealth not yet acquired and increase wealth already acquired, and he also lacks the kind of eye with which one can know wholesome and unwholesome qualities, blameworthy and blameless qualities, inferior and superior qualities, dark and bright qualities with their counterparts.

This is called the blind person.

(2) "And what is the one-eyed person?

Here, some person has the kind of eye with which one can acquire wealth not yet acquired and increase wealth already acquired, but he lacks the kind of eye with which one can know wholesome and unwholesome qualities, blameworthy and blameless qualities, inferior and superior qualities, dark and bright qualities with their counterparts.

This is called the one-eyed person.

(3) "And what is the two-eyed person?

Here, some person has the kind of eye with which one can acquire wealth not yet acquired and increase wealth already acquired, and he also has the kind of eye with which one can know wholesome and unwholesome qualities, blameworthy and blameless qualities, inferior and superior qualities, dark and bright qualities with their counterparts.

This is called the two-eyed person.

"These, bhikkhus, are the three kinds of persons found existing in the world."

He does not possess such wealth,
nor does he do deeds of merit;
the blind man destitute of eyes
casts an unlucky throw in both respects.

The person described as one-eyed
is a hypocrite who seeks wealth,
[sometimes] righteously
[and sometimes] unrighteously.

Both by thievish cheatful acts
and by means of false speech
the man indulging in sensual pleasures
is skilled in amassing wealth.
Having gone from here to hell,
the one-eyed person is tormented.

One with two eyes is said to be
the best kind of person.
His wealth is acquired by his own exertion,
with goods righteously gained.

With best intentions he then gives,
this person with an undivided mind.
He goes to [rebirth in] an excellent state
where, having gone, one does not sorrow.

One should avoid from afar
the blind one and the one-eyed person,
but should befriend the one with two eyes,
the best kind of person.


Contact:
E-mail
Copyright Statement