Aŋguttara Nikāya


 

Aŋguttara Nikāya
4. Catukka Nipāta
III. Uruvelā Vagga

The Numerical Discourses of the Buddha
IV. The Book of the Fours
III. Uruvelā

Sutta 24

Kāḷaka Suttaɱ

Kāḷaka

Translated from the Pali by Bhikkhu Bodhi.

© 2012 Bhikkhu Bodhi
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[24] [411]

[1][pts][than] [Thus have I heard.]

On one occasion the Blessed One was dwelling at Sāketa, at Kāḷaka's Park. There the Blessed One addressed the bhikkhus:

"Bhikkhus!"

"Venerable sir!" those bhikkhus replied.

The Blessed One said this:

[25] "Bhikkhus, in this world with its devas, Māra, and Brahmā, among this population with its ascetics and brahmins, its devas and humans, whatever is seen, heard, sensed, cognized, reached, sought after, examined by the mind — that I know.

"Bhikkhus, in this world with its devas, Māra, and Brahmā, among this population with its ascetics and brahmins, its devas and humans, whatever is seen, heard, sensed, cognized, reached, sought after, examined by the mind — that I have directly known.

It has been known by the Tathāgata, but the Tathāgata did not become subservient to it.

"Bhikkhus, if I were to say, 'In this world with its devas ... whatever is seen, heard, sensed, cognized, reached, sought after, examined by the mind — that I do not know,' that would be a falsehood on my part.

"Bhikkhus, if I were to say, 'In this world with its devas ... whatever is seen, heard, sensed, cognized, reached, sought after, examined by the mind — that I both know and do not know,' that too would be just the same.

"Bhikkhus, if I were to say, 'In this world with its devas ... whatever is seen, heard, sensed, cognized, reached, sought after, examined by the mind — that I neither know nor do not know,' that would be a fault on my part.

(1) "So, having seen what can be seen, the Tathāgata does not misconceive the seen, does not misconceive the unseen, does not misconceive what can be seen, does not misconceive one who sees.

(2) Having heard what can be heard, he does not misconceive the heard, does not misconceive the unheard, does not misconceive what can be heard, does not misconceive one who hears.

(3) Having sensed what can be sensed, he does not misconceive the sensed, does not misconceive the unsensed, does not misconceive what can be sensed, does not misconceive one who senses.

(4) Having cognized what can be cognized, he does not misconceive the cognized, does not misconceive the uncognized, does not misconceive what can be cognized, does not misconceive one who cognizes.

"Thus, bhikkhus, being ever stable among things seen, heard, sensed, and cognized, the Tathāgata is a stable one.

And, I say, there is no stable one more excellent or sublime than that stable one."

Amidst those who are self-constrained, the Stable One
would not serve as categorically true or false
anything seen, heard, or sensed,
clung to and considered truth by others.

Since they have already seen this dart
to which people cling and adhere,
[26] [saying] "I know, I see, it is just so,"
the Tathāgata's cling to nothing.


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