Aŋguttara Nikāya


 

Aŋguttara Nikāya
VIII. Aṭṭhaka Nipāta
IV. Dāna Vagga

The Numerical Discourses of the Buddha
VIII. The Book of the Eights
IV. Giving

Sutta 38

Sappurisa Suttaɱ

The Good Person

Translated from the Pali by Bhikkhu Bodhi.

© 2012 Bhikkhu Bodhi
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[244] [1173]

[1][pts] "Bhikkhus, when a good person is born in a family, it is for the good, welfare, and happiness of many people.

It is for the good, welfare, and happiness of (1) his mother and father, (2) his wife and children, (3) his slaves, workers, and servants, (4) his friends and companions, (5) his departed ancestors, (6) the king, (7) the deities, and (8) ascetics and brahmins.

Just as a great rain cloud, nurturing all the crops, appears for the good, welfare, and happiness of many people, so too, when a good person is born in a family, it is for the good, welfare, and happiness of many people.

It is for the good, welfare, and happiness of his mother and father ... [245] ... ascetics and brahmins."

The wise person, dwelling at home,
truly lives for the good of many.
Day and night diligent toward
his mother, father, and ancestors,
he venerates them in accordance with the Dhamma,
recollecting what they did [for him] in the past.

Firm in faith, the pious man,
having known their good qualities,
venerates the homeless renouncers,
the mendicants who lead the spiritual life.

Beneficial to the king and the devas,
beneficial to his relatives and friends,
indeed, beneficial to all,
well established in the good Dhamma,
he has removed the stain of miserliness
and fares on to an auspicious world.


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