" /> AN 7 6: Dhana Sutta

Aŋguttara Nikāya


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Aŋguttara Nikāya
Sattaka Nipāta
Dhana Vaggo

Sutta 6

Vitthata Dhana Suttaɱ

Treasure

Translated from the Pali by Thanissaro Bhikkhu.
Proofed against and modified in accordance with the revised edition at dhammatalks.org
Provenance, terms and conditons

 


 

[1][pts][upal] "Monks, there are these seven treasures.

Which seven?

The treasure of conviction,
the treasure of virtue,
the treasure of sense of shame,
the treasure of a sense of compunction,
the treasure of listening,
the treasure of generosity,
the treasure of discernment.

 

§

 

"And what is the treasure of conviction?

There is the case where a disciple of the noble ones
has conviction,
is convinced of the Tathāgata's Awakening:

'Indeed, the Blessed One is worthy
and rightly self-awakened,
consummate in clear-knowing and conduct,
well-gone,
an expert with regard to the cosmos,
unexcelled as a trainer
of those people fit to be tamed,
the Teacher of devas and human beings,
awakened,
blessed.'

This is called the treasure of conviction.

"And what is the treasure of virtue?

There is the case where a disciple of the noble ones
abstains from taking life,
abstains from stealing,
abstains from sexual misconduct,
abstains from lying,
abstains from taking intoxicants
that cause heedlessness.

This, monks, is called the treasure of virtue.

"And what is the treasure of a sense of shame?

There is the case where a disciple of the noble ones
feels shame
at [the thought of engaging in] bodily misconduct,
verbal misconduct,
mental misconduct.

This is called the treasure of a sense of shame.

"And what is the treasure of a sense of compunction?

There is the case where a disciple of the noble ones
feels compunction
at [the suffering that would result from] bodily misconduct,
verbal misconduct,
mental misconduct.

This is called the treasure of a sense of compunction.

"And what is the treasure of listening?

There is the case where a disciple of the noble ones
has heard much,
has retained what he/she has heard,
has stored what he/she has heard.

Whatever teachings are admirable in the beginning,
admirable in the middle,
admirable in the end,
that — in their meaning and expression —
proclaim the holy life
that is entirely perfect, surpassingly pure:
Those he/she has listened to often,
retained,
discussed,
accumulated,
examined with his/her mind,
and well-penetrated
in terms of his/her views.

This is called the treasure of listening.

"And what is the treasure of generosity?

There is the case of a disciple of the noble ones,
his awareness cleansed of the stain of stinginess,
living at home,
freely generous,
openhanded,
delighting in being magnanimous,
responsive to requests,
delighting in the distribution of alms.

This is called the treasure of generosity.

"And what is the treasure of discernment?

There is the case where a disciple of the noble ones
is discerning,
endowed with discernment
of arising and passing away
— noble, penetrating,
leading to the right ending of stress.

This is called the treasure of discernment."

These, monks, are the seven treasures.

The treasure of conviction,
the treasure of virtue,
the treasure of a sense of shame and compunction,
the treasure of listening, generosity,
and discernment as the seventh treasure.
Whoever, man or woman, has these treasures
is said not to be poor,
has not lived in vain.
So conviction and virtue,
faith and Dhamma-vision
should be cultivated by the wise,
remembering the Buddhas' instruction.

 


 

Of Related Interest:

AN 2:9

 


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