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Saɱyutta Nikāya,
V: Mahā-Vagga
47. Satipaṭṭhana Saɱyutta
2. Nālandā Vagga

Sutta 11

Mahāpurisa Suttaɱ

The Great Man

Translated from the Pali by obo.

 


 

[1][pts][bodh] I HEAR TELL:

Once upon a time Bhagava, Sāvatthi-town revisiting, Anāthapiṇḍika's Jeta-forest park.

2. There then Old Man Sāriputta approached The Lucky Man and drew near.

Having drawn near and given salutation, he took a seat to one side.

Seated to one side then, Old Man Sāriputta said this to the Lucky Man:

3. "A Great Man, a Great Man!" bhante, is what they say.

Now then, what is it, bhante, that constitutes a Great Man?

A being freed in heart is what I, Sāriputta, call a Great Man.

A being not freed in heart
is not called a Great Man.

And being free in heart how, Sāriputta?

4. Here, Sāriputta, a beggar lives in body overseeing body.

Ardent, self-aware, recollected,
he disciplines worldly ambitions and disappointments.

So living in the body overseeing the body
the heart is lust-free,
released
unassailed by corrupting influences.

Lives in sensation overseeing sensation.

Ardent, self-aware, recollected,
he disciplines worldly ambitions and disappointments.

So living in sensation overseeing sensation
the heart is lust-free,
released
unassailed by corrupting influences.

Lives in the heart overseeing the heart.

Ardent, self-aware, recollected,
he disciplines worldly ambitions and disappointments.

So living in the heart overseeing the heart
the heart is lust-free,
released
unassailed by corrupting influences.

Lives in the Dhamma[1] overseeing the Dhamma.

Ardent, self-aware, recollected,
he disciplines worldly ambitions and disappointments.

So living in the Dhamma overseeing the Dhamma
the heart is lust-free,
released
unassailed by corrupting influences.

This then, Sāriputta, is being freed in heart,
is what I, Sāriputta, call a Great Man.

A being not freed in heart
is not called a Great Man.

 


[1] Dhamma. The principles by which things work. The task, in setting up the memory, is becoming aware of, and making into ones aparatus of perception these principles. Once set up it is the use of these principles to perceive and let go. One uses the Dhamma as a lens through which one understands things and modulate behavior. According to the Satipatthana method [MN 10, DN 22 (and in parts in many other places) one keeps oversees things (primarily, but not exclusively) through the following 'Things' (Dhammas): 5 Involvements, The 5 Stockpiles, The Sixfold Realm of the Senses, The Seven Dimensions of Self-awakening, and the Aristocratic Multi-dimensional High Way.

 


 

References:

AN 8 30 Pali, 'mahāpuriso';
AN 8 30, Hare.

 


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