Aŋguttara Nikāya


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Aŋguttara-Nikāya
III. Tika Nipāta
XI. Sambodhi Vagga

The Book of the Gradual Sayings
or
More-Numbered Suttas

III. The Book of the Threes
XI. Enlightenment

Sutta 101

Pubbe'va Sambodha Suttaɱ

Before[1]

Translated from the Pali by
F.L. Woodward, M.A.

Copyright The Pali Text Society
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[237]

[1] Thus have I heard:

Once the Exalted One was dwelling near Sāvatthī.

There the Exalted One addressed the monks, saying:

"Monks."

"Yes, lord," they replied,
and the Exalted One said:

"Before my enlightenment, monks,
when I was yet but a Bodhisat,
this occurred to me:

'What, I wonder,
is the satisfaction in the world,[2]
what is the misery in the world,
what is the escape therefrom?'

Then, monks, this occurred to me:

'That condition in the world
owing to which pleasure arises,
owing to which arises happiness, -
that is the satisfaction in the world.

That impermanence,
that suffering,
that changeability in the world, -
that is the misery in the world.

That restraint,
that riddance of desire and passion in the world,
that is the escape therefrom.'[3]

 

§

 

2. So long, monks,
as I did not thoroughly comprehend,
as it really is,
the satisfaction in the world as such,
the misery in the world as such,
the escape therefrom as such,
so long did I not discern the meaning
of[4] being enlightened
with perfect enlightenment
unsurpassed in the world
with its devas,
its Maras and Brahmās,
together with the host of recluses and brahmins,
of devas and mankind.

But, monks, when I fully comprehended,
as it really is,
the satisfaction in the world as such,
the misery in the world as such,
the escape therefrom as such, -
then did I discern the meaning
of being enlightened
with perfect enlightenment
unsurpassed in the world
with its devas,
its Maras and Brahmās,
together with the host of recluses and brahmins,
of devas and mankind.

Then did knowledge and insight arise in me, thus:

'Sure is my heart's release.

This is my last birth.

Now is there no more becoming again.'

 

§

 

3. Seeking satisfaction in the world, monks,
I had pursued my way.[5]

That satisfaction in the world I found.

In so far as satisfaction existed in the world,
by insight I saw it well.

Seeking for the misery in the world, monks,
I had [238] pursued my way.

That misery iu the world I found.

In so far as misery existed in the world,
by insight I saw it well.

Seeking for the escape from the world, monks,
I had pursued my way.

That escape from the world I found.

In so far as escape from the world existed,
by insight I saw it well.

 

§

 

4. So long, monks,
as I did not thoroughly comprehend,
as it really is,
the satisfaction in the world as such,
the misery in the world as such,
the escape therefrom as such,
so long did I not discern the meaning
of being enlightened
with perfect enlightenment
unsurpassed in the world
with its devas,
its Maras and Brahmās,
together with the host of recluses and brahmins,
of devas and mankind.

But, monks, when I fully comprehended,
as it really is,
the satisfaction in the world as such,
the misery in the world as such,
the escape therefrom as such, -
then did I discern the meaning
of being enlightened
with perfect enlightenment
unsurpassed in the world
with its devas,
its Maras and Brahmās,
together with the host of recluses and brahmins,
of devas and mankind.

Then did knowledge and insight arise in me, thus:

'Sure is my heart's release.

This is my last birth.

Now is there no more becoming again.'"

 


[1] cf. K.S. ii, 113. Here pubbe is a prep, with abl. Cf. Pts. ii, 109.

[2] Loke. Here texts are confused. Comy. also reads loko.

[3] Reading with Comy. loka-nissaraṇaɱ (= lokato nissaṭṭattā) for text's loke-n.

[4] Reading with S. ii sambuddho ti. Our text omits ti throughout.

[5] Ever since the time when he was the brāhmin Sumedha, says Comy.


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