Aŋguttara Nikāya


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Aŋguttara-Nikāya
Pañcaka-Nipāta
22. Akkosaka Vagga

The Book of the Gradual Sayings
The Book of the Fives
Chapter XXII: The Abuser

Sutta 218

Dutiya Apāsādika Suttaɱ

The Troubled Mind (b)

Translated by E. M. Hare

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[187]

[1] Thus have I heard:

Once the Exalted One dwelt near Sāvatthī; and there he addressed the monks, saying: 'Monks.'

'Yes, lord,' they replied; and the Exalted One said:

"Monks, there are these five disadvantages
to one of troubled mind.

What five?

Wild[1] (thoughts) are not calmed;
and some of those that are calmed
become otherwise;
the Teacher's behest is left undone;
folk coming after
fall into the ways of wrong views;
and one's heart wins not to peace.

Monks, these are the five disadvantages
to one of troubled mind.'

 

§

 

"Monks, there are these five advantages
to one of untroubled mind.

What five?

Wild thoughts are calmed;
and those that are,
become much more so;
the teacher's behest is done;
after-folk get right views;
and one's heart wins to peace.

Monks, these are the five advantages
to one of untroubled mind.'

 


[1] Appasannā na ppasīdanti


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