Aŋguttara Nikāya


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Aŋguttara-Nikāya
Pañcaka-Nipāta
25. Du-c-carita Vagga

The Book of the Gradual Sayings
The Book of the Fives
Chapter XXV: Walking in Evil

Sutta 250

Puggala-p-Pasāda Suttaɱ

Devotion[1] to One Person

Translated by E. M. Hare

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[196]

[1] Thus have I heard:

Once the Exalted One dwelt near Sāvatthī;
and there he addressed the monks, saying:

"Monks."

'Yes, lord,' they replied;
and the Exalted One said:

"Monks, there are these five disadvantages
of devotion to one person.

What five?

Monks, when a person
becomes very devoted to a person
and that person falls into an error
such that the Order suspend him,
then he will think:

"The Order has suspended
him who is dear and lovely to me!"

And he will be no more
full of devotion for the monks,
and from being without that devotion
he will not follow other monks,
and from not following other monks
he will not hear Saddhamma,
and from not hearing Saddhamma
he will fall away from Saddhamma.

This, monks, is the first disadvantage
of devotion to one person.

Or that person falls into an error
such that the Order make him sit on the outskirts (of a gathering),
then he will think:

"The Order has made
him who is dear and lovely to me
sit on the outskirts!"

And he will be no more
full of devotion for the monks,
and from being without that devotion
he will not follow other monks,
and from not following other monks
he will not hear Saddhamma,
and from not hearing Saddhamma
he will fall away from Saddhamma.

This, monks, is the second disadvantage
of devotion to one person.

[197] Or when a person
becomes very devoted to a person
and that person is gone to a distant place,
then he will think:

"He is gone to a distant place,
he who was dear and lovely to me!"

And he will not follow other monks,
and from not following other monks
he will not hear Saddhamma,
and from not hearing Saddhamma
he will fall away from Saddhamma.

This, monks, is the third disadvantage
of devotion to one person.

Or when a person
becomes very devoted to a person
and that person wanders[2] (in mind),
then he will think:

"He wanders,
he who was dear and lovely to me!"

And he will not follow other monks,
and from not following other monks
he will not hear Saddhamma,
and from not hearing Saddhamma
he will fall away from Saddhamma.

This, monks, is the fourth disadvantage
of devotion to one person.

Or when a person
becomes very devoted to a person
and that person dies,
then he will think:

"He is dead,
he who was dear and lovely to me!"

And he will not follow other monks,
and from not following other monks
he will not hear Saddhamma,
and from not hearing Saddhamma
he will fall away from Saddhamma.

This, monks, is the fifth disadvantage
of devotion to one person.

Verily, monks, these are the five disadvantages
of devotion to one person.'

 


[1] Pasāda more lit. satisfaction, or faith.

Vibbhamati. Bhk. Bodhi understands this to mean disrobing (departing from the Order); it could also mean that the friend has decided to 'split' 'break up' the friendship.

p.p. explains it all — p.p.

[2] Vibbhanto.


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