Aŋguttara Nikāya


[Home]  [Sutta Indexes]  [Glossology]  [Site Sub-Sections]


 

Aŋguttara Nikāya
X. Dasaka-Nipāta
VI. Sa-Citta Vagga

The Book of the Gradual Sayings
X. The Book of the Tens
VI: One's Own Thoughts

Sutta 55

Parihāna Suttaɱ

Waning

Translated from the Pali by F. L. Woodward, M.A.

Copyright The Pali Text Society
Commercial Rights Reserved
Creative Commons Licence
For details see Terms of Use.

 


[102] [70]

[1][bodh] Thus have I heard:

Once the venerable Sāriputta was dwelling near Sāvatthī.

Thereupon the venerable Sāriputta addressed the monks, saying:

"Monks, your reverences."

"Yes, your reverence," replied those monks to the venerable Sāriputta,
who then said:

"Your reverences, there is the frequent saying

'A person whose nature is to wane.'

Now to what extent has a person been called by the Exalted One

'a person whose nature is to wane,'

and to what extent has a person been called

'A person whose nature is to wax'?"

"We would come from far, your reverence,
to know the meaning of this
in the presence of the venerable Sāriputta.

It were well if the meaning of this saying
were to occur to the venerable Sāriputta.

[103] Hearing it from the venerable Sāriputta
the monks would bear it in mind."

"Then, your reverences, do ye listen.

Pay attention carefully
and I will speak."

"We will, your reverence,"
replied those monks to the venerable Sāriputta,
who then said:

 

§

 

"Now to what extent was a person called
'of a nature to wane'
by the Exalted One?

what is unintelligible: viññātañ and aviññātañ. Intuitively understood/not intuitively understood. He has that ability or not. What is unintelligible is unintelligible. One cannot understand what is unintelligible. Some things can be objectively unintelligible (as, for example, a rock) other things are unintelligible to some but not to others. Viññāta was apparently unintelligible to Woodward.

p.p. explains it all — p.p.

Herein, your reverences, a monk listens not
to a teaching not heard before,
while the teachings he has heard
go to confusion;
those teachings formerly contacted by thought[1]
no longer occur to him,
and he understands not what is unintelligible.

To this extent was a person called
'one of a nature to wane'
by the Exalted One.

And to what extent was a person called
'of a nature to wax'
by the Exalted One?

Herein, your reverences, a monk listens to a teaching not heard before,
while the teachings he has heard
do not go to confusion;
those teachings formerly contacted by thought
continue to occur to him,
and he understands what is unintelligible.

Though a monk be not skilled in the habit of others' hearts,
yet he can resolve:

'I will be skilled in the habit of my own heart.'

That, your reverences, is how ye must train yourselves.

 

§

 

And how is a monk skilled in the habit of his own heart?

[104] [71] Just as if, monks, a woman or man
or a young lad
fond of self-adornment,
examining the reflection of his own face
in a bright clean mirror
or bowl of clear water,
should see therein a stain
or speck
and strive for the removal of that stain
or speck;
and when he no longer sees it there
is pleased and satisfied thereat, thinking:

'A gain it is to me that I am clean' -
even so a monk's introspection
is most fruitful in good conditions, thus:

'Do I or do I not generally live covetous?

Is this condition to be seen in me or not?

Do I or do I not generally live malevolent in heart?

Is this condition to be seen in me or not?

Do I or do I not generally live possessed by sloth-and-torpor?

Is this condition to be seen in me or not?

Do I or do I not generally live excited in mind?

Is this condition to be seen in me or not?

Do I or do I not generally live in doubt-and-wavering,
or have I crossed beyond it?

Is this condition to be seen in me or not?

Do I or do I not generally live wrathful or not?

Is this condition to be seen in me or not?

Do I or do I not generally live with soiled thoughts or clean thoughts?

Is this condition to be seen in me or not?

Do I or do I not generally live with body passionate or not?

Is this condition to be seen in me or not?

Do I or do I not generally live sluggish or full of energy?

Is this condition to be seen in me or not?

Do I or do I not generally live uncontrolled or well-controlled?

Is this condition to be seen in me or not?

Am I a winner of delight in Dhamma?[2]

Is this condition to be seen in me or not?

Am I or am I not
a winner of peace of heart in my own self?

Is this condition to be seen in me or not?

Am I or am I not
a winner of insight of the higher
and insight into dhamma?

Is this condition to be seen in me or not?'

If, your reverences, a monk
on self-examination finds:

'All these profitable conditions are not in my self' -

then for the acquiring of all these profitable conditions
he must put forth extra desire,
effort,
endeavour,
exertion,
unflagging mindfulness
and attention
for the acquiring
of those profitable conditions.

Just as, monks, when one's turban or head is ablaze,
for the extinguishing thereof
one must put forth extra desire,
effort,
endeavour,
exertion,
unflagging mindfulness
and attention,
even so for acquiring of those profitable conditions
one must put forth extra desire,
effort,
endeavour,
exertion,
impulse,
unflagging mindfulness
and attention
for acquiring of those profitable conditions.

If, however, your reverences,
on self-examination
a monk finds some profitable conditions in himself,
but not others,
[105] then, for the establishment of those profitable conditions
he sees in himself
and for the acquiring of those which he sees not in himself,
he must put forth extra desire,
effort,
endeavour,
exertion,
unflagging mindfulness
and attention.

Just as, monks, when one's turban or head is ablaze,
for the extinguishing thereof
one must put forth extra desire,
effort,
endeavour,
exertion,
unflagging mindfulness
and attention,
even so for acquiring of those profitable conditions
one must put forth extra desire,
effort,
endeavour,
exertion,
impulse,
unflagging mindfulness
and attention
for acquiring of those profitable conditions.

If again on self-examination a monk finds:

'All these profitable conditions are to be found in my own self',

then, your reverences,
he must make an effort to establish
just those profitable conditions
and further to destroy the cankers.'

 


c'assa dhammā pubbe cetaso samphuṭṭhapubbā,||
te ca na samudācaranti.

those past things previously personally contacted by heart those are not brought up.
The idea is those things which were at a previous time known by heart (Woodward's 'contacted by thought') are not refreshed.
Bhk. Bodhi has: "does not bring to mind those teachings with which he is already familar"

p.p. explains it all — p.p.

[1] Cf. K.S. iv, 60.

[2] This is an addition to the former items.


Contact:
E-mail
Copyright Statement