Aŋguttara Nikāya


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Aŋguttara Nikāya
X. Dasaka-Nipāta
IX: Thera-Vagga

The Book of the Gradual Sayings
X. The Book of the Tens
IX: The Elders

Sutta 85

Katthi Suttaɱ

The Boaster

Translated from the Pali by F. L. Woodward, M.A.

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[106]

[1] THUS have I heard:

Once the venerable Cunda the Great[1] was staying among the Cetī at Sahajātī.

On that occasion he addressed the monks, saying:

"Monks, your reverences."

"Yes, your reverence,"
replied those monks to the venerable Cunda the Great,
who said:

"In this matter, your reverences, suppose a monk is a boaster[2]
and garrulous about his own attainments, thus:

'I have attained the first musing and can emerge[3] therefrom.'

[158] 'I can [107] attain the second musing[ed1] and can emerge therefrom.'

'I can attain the third musing and can emerge therefrom.'

'I can attain the fourth musing and can emerge therefrom.'

'I can attain the sphere of infinity of space and can emerge therefrom.'

'I can attain the sphere of infinity of consciousness and can emerge therefrom.'

'I can attain the sphere of nothingness and can emerge therefrom.'

'I can attain the sphere of neither-perception-nor-not-perception and can emerge therefrom.'

'I can attain the sphere wherein perception-and-feeling are ended, and can emerge therefrom.'

 

§

 

Then the Wayfarer
or a Wayfarer's disciple
who is a muser,
skilled in attaining (musing),
skilled in reading others' hearts,
skilled in reading the habit of others' hearts,
closely examines,
questions
and talks with him.

He, thus closely examined,
questioned
and talked with
by the Wayfarer
or a disciple of the Wayfarer,
who is a muser,
skilled in attaining (musing),
skilled in reading others' hearts,
skilled in reading the habit of others' hearts,
-he comes to a desert (so to speak),
he comes to a jungle,
he comes to an ill pass,
to ruin,
to an ill pass and ruin alike.

For the Wayfarer or Wayfarer's disciple,
who is a muser,
skilled in attaining (musing),
skilled in reading others' hearts,
skilled in reading the habit of others' hearts,
reading his heart with his own thus ponders:

'How is it that this worthy is a boaster and garrulous about his own attainments, so as to say:

"I have attained the first musing and can emerge therefrom."

"I can attain the second musing and can emerge therefrom."

"I can attain the third musing and can emerge therefrom."

"I can attain the fourth musing and can emerge therefrom."

"I can attain the sphere of infinity of space and can emerge therefrom."

"I can attain the sphere of infinity of consciousness and can emerge therefrom."

"I can attain the sphere of nothingness and can emerge therefrom."

"I can attain the sphere of neither-perception-nor-not-perception and can emerge therefrom."

"I can attain the sphere wherein perception-and-feeling are ended, and can emerge therefrom"'?

 

§

 

Then the Wayfarer
or a Wayfarer's disciple
who is a muser,
skilled in attaining (musing),
skilled in reading others' hearts,
skilled in reading the habit of others' hearts,
reading his heart with his own, comes to know:

'For many a day
this worthy has been one
whose deeds are incongruous,
inconsistent,
shady
and spotted.

His deeds,
his habits
are not consistent with good morals.

This worthy is immoral,
and immorality like this
means waning in the Dhamma-discipline
proclaimed by the Wayfarer.

Moreover this worthy is an unbeliever,
and unbelief
means waning in the Dhamma-discipline
proclaimed by the Wayfarer.

[159] He is of little learning,
and little learning
means waning in the Dhamma-discipline
proclaimed by the Wayfarer.

He is foul-spoken,
and foul speech
means waning in the Dhamma-discipline
proclaimed by the Wayfarer.

He has wicked friends,
and wicked friendship
means waning in the Dhamma-discipline
proclaimed by the Wayfarer.

He is slothful,
and sloth
means waning in the Dhamma-discipline
proclaimed by the Wayfarer.

He is of muddled wits,
and muddled wits
means waning in the Dhamma-discipline
proclaimed by the Wayfarer.

He is a fraud,
and fraudulence
means waning in the Dhamma-discipline
proclaimed by the Wayfarer.

He is not forbearing,[4]
and not-forbearance
means waning in the Dhamma-discipline
proclaimed by the Wayfarer.

This worthy is weak in wisdom,
and weak wisdom
means waning in this Dhamma-discipline
proclaimed by the Wayfarer.'

 

§

 

Suppose, your reverences, a friend should say to his friend:

[108] 'When you are in need of money, old man,
you will ask me for money
and I will give it you.'

The latter, when need of money arises,
says to the former:

'I need money, old man.

Give me money.'

The other replies:

'Then dig here, old man.'

He digs there but finds no money,
and says to the other:

'You told me a lie.

You gave me empty words in saying:

"Dig here."

The other replies:

'No I told you no lie,
I gave you not empty words;
so dig you here.'

He does so,
but finds no money,
and again reproaches his friend with falsehood.

Again the friend denies it,
[160] saying:

'I told you no lie.

I gave you not empty words,
but I was out of my mind;
I was distracted.'[5]

 

§

 

Just in the same way,
your reverences,
suppose a monk is a boaster
and garrulous about his own attainments, thus:

'I have attained the first musing and can emerge therefrom.'

'I can attain the second musing and can emerge therefrom.'

'I can attain the third musing and can emerge therefrom.'

'I can attain the fourth musing and can emerge therefrom.'

'I can attain the sphere of infinity of space and can emerge therefrom.'

'I can attain the sphere of infinity of consciousness and can emerge therefrom.'

'I can attain the sphere of nothingness and can emerge therefrom.'

'I can attain the sphere of neither-perception-nor-not-perception and can emerge therefrom.'

'I can attain the sphere wherein perception-and-feeling are ended, and can emerge therefrom.'

 

§

 

Then the Wayfarer
or a Wayfarer's disciple
who is a muser,
skilled in attaining (musing),
skilled in reading others' hearts,
skilled in reading the habit of others' hearts,
closely examines,
questions
and talks with him.

He, thus closely examined,
questioned
and talked with
by the Wayfarer
or a disciple of the Wayfarer,
who is a muser,
skilled in attaining (musing),
skilled in reading others' hearts,
skilled in reading the habit of others' hearts,
-he comes to a desert (so to speak),
he comes to a jungle,
he comes to an ill pass,
to ruin,
to an ill pass and ruin alike.

 

§

 

For the Wayfarer or Wayfarer's disciple,
who is a muser,
skilled in attaining (musing),
skilled in reading others' hearts,
skilled in reading the habit of others' hearts,
reading his heart with his own thus ponders:

How is it that this worthy is a boaster and garrulous about his own attainments, so as to say:

"I have attained the first musing and can emergetherefrom."

"I can attain the second musing and can emerge therefrom."

"I can attain the third musing and can emerge therefrom."

"I can attain the fourth musing and can emerge therefrom."

"I can attain the sphere of infinity of space and can emerge therefrom."

"I can attain the sphere of infinity of consciousness and can emerge therefrom."

"I can attain the sphere of nothingness and can emerge therefrom."

"I can attain the sphere of neither-perception-nor-not-perception and can emerge therefrom."

"I can attain the sphere wherein perception-and-feeling are ended, and can emerge therefrom"'?

 

§

 

Then the Wayfarer
or a Wayfarer's disciple
who is a muser
skilled in attaining (musing),
skilled in reading others' hearts,
skilled in reading the habit of others' hearts,
reading his heart with his own, comes to know:

'For many a day
this worthy has been one
whose deeds are incongruous,
inconsistent,
shady
and spotted.

His deeds,
his habits
are not consistent with good morals.

This worthy is immoral,
and immorality like this
means waning in the Dhamma-discipline
proclaimed by the Wayfarer.

Moreover this worthy is an unbeliever,
and unbelief
means waning in the Dhamma-discipline
proclaimed by the Wayfarer.

He is of little learning,
and little learning
means waning in the Dhamma-discipline
proclaimed by the Wayfarer.

He is foul-spoken,
and foul speech
means waning in the Dhamma-discipline
proclaimed by the Wayfarer.

He has wicked friends,
and wicked friendship
means waning in the Dhamma-discipline
proclaimed by the Wayfarer.

He is slothful,
and sloth
means waning in the Dhamma-discipline
proclaimed by the Wayfarer.

He is of muddled wits,
and muddled wits
means waning in the Dhamma-discipline
proclaimed by the Wayfarer.

He is a fraud,
and fraudulence
means waning in the Dhamma-discipline
proclaimed by the Wayfarer.

He is not forbearing,
and not-forbearance
means waning in the Dhamma-discipline
proclaimed by the Wayfarer.

This worthy is weak in wisdom,
and weak wisdom
means waning in this Dhamma-discipline
proclaimed by the Wayfarer.'

 

§

 

Indeed, monks, if he abandon not these ten qualities
[161] there is no possibility for a monk to reach increase,
growth
and maturity
in this Dhamma-discipline.

But if he abandon these ten qualities
there is the possibility for a monk to reach increase,
growth
and maturity
in this Dhamma-discipline."

 


[1] At § 24 and G.S. iii, 252 (about musing) he speaks to the monks at the same place.

[2] Katthī seems not to occur elsewhere. The strengthened form in negative is at Sn. 850; MP. 414. Here Comy. says kathana-sīlo, vivaṭaɱ katheti.

[3] 'Emergence' is said to mean the power to return to normal consciousness at a given predetermined moment. Cf. Path of Purity, iii, 870.

[4] Dubbhara; cf. A. iv, 280.

[5] Cf. S. i, 126; G.S. ii, 90, ummādaɱ vā pāpuṇeyya citta-vikkhepaɱ vā; here cetoso vipariyāyaɱ. Below, § 8. For Samma cf. G.S. i, 211 n.[?]

 


[ed1] Woodward omits from this list the second through 'infinity of consciousness'. Terms are taken from his translation of AN 10.99 where he translates āyatana as 'plane', and n'eva-saññā-nāsaññāyatanaɱ as 'neither-consciousness-nor-unconsciousness' and saññāvedayitanirodhaɱ as 'the ending of consciousness and feeling'.


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