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Saɱyutta Nikāya,
V: Mahā-Vagga
46. Bojjhanga Saɱyutta
I. Pabbata-Vaggo

The Book of the Kindred Sayings
V: The Great Chapter
46: Kindred Sayings on the Limbs of Wisdom
I. The Mountain

Sutta 8

Upavāna Suttaɱ

Upavāṇa

Translated by F. L. Woodward

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[1][bodh][than] THUS have I heard:

On a certain occasion the venerable Upavāṇa[1]
and the venerable Sāriputta
were staying near Kosambī
in Ghosita Park.[2]

On that occasion the venerable Sāriputta,
rising at eventide from his solitude,
went to visit the venerable Upavāṇa,
and [64] on coming to him
greeted him courteously,
and after the exchange of greetings and courtesies,
sat down at one side.

So seated
the venerable Sāriputta
said this to the venerable Upavana:

"Pray, friend Upavāṇa,
could a monk thus know of himself:[3]

'The seven limbs of wisdom,
by systematic attention to them,[4]
being well established in me,
conduce to pleasant living?'"

"He could thus know of himself, friend Sāriputta:

'The seven limbs of wisdom,
by systematic attention to them,
being well established in me,
conduce to pleasant living.'

By striving to start[5] the limb of wisdom that is mindfulness he knows:

'My heart is well released.

Sloth and torpor in me are well abolished.

Excitement and flurry are well restrained.

Resolute energy is mine.

By making it my object,[6]
I give it my attention.

It is not slack[7] in me.'

By striving to start the limb of wisdom that is Norm-investigation he knows:

'My heart is well released.

Sloth and torpor in me are well abolished.

Excitement and flurry are well restrained.

Resolute energy is mine.

By making it my object,
I give it my attention.

It is not slack in me.'

By striving to start the limb of wisdom that is Norm-investigation he knows:

'My heart is well released.

Sloth and torpor in me are well abolished.

Excitement and flurry are well restrained.

Resolute energy is mine.

By making it my object,
I give it my attention.

It is not slack in me.'

By striving to start the limb of wisdom that is zest he knows:

'My heart is well released.

Sloth and torpor in me are well abolished.

Excitement and flurry are well restrained.

Resolute energy is mine.

By making it my object,
I give it my attention.

It is not slack in me.'

By striving to start the limb of wisdom that is tranquillity he knows:

'My heart is well released.

Sloth and torpor in me are well abolished.

Excitement and flurry are well restrained.

Resolute energy is mine.

By making it my object,
I give it my attention.

It is not slack in me.'

By striving to start the limb of wisdom that is concentration he knows:

'My heart is well released.

Sloth and torpor in me are well abolished.

Excitement and flurry are well restrained.

Resolute energy is mine.

By making it my object,
I give it my attention.

It is not slack in me.'

By striving to start the limb of wisdom that is equanimity he knows:

'My heart is well released.

Sloth and torpor in me are well abolished.

Excitement and flurry are well restrained.

Resolute energy is mine.

By making it my object,
I give it my attention.

It is not slack in me.'

Thus, friend Sāriputta,
a monk could know of himself:

'By systematic attention to them,
thus well established in me,
the seven limbs of wisdom
conduce to pleasant living.'"

 


[1] K.S. i, 220, ii, 32, iv, 21. He was personal attendant on the Buddha before Ānanda.

[2] Cf. K.S. iv, 62, [? §127?] 102.

[3] Paccattaŋ. [PED: [paṭi+attan] separate, individual; usually acc. -ɱ adv. separately, individually, singly, by himself, in his own heart]

[4] Text manasikārā, but MSS. and Comy. -kāro.

[5] Text ārambhamāno. Comy. ārabbhamāno = kurumāno.

[6] Cf. S. ii, 220; K.S. ii, 149 (aṭṭhikatvā, manasikatvā); infra, text 95.

[7] Līnaŋ. Cf. text 64 (līnatta); infra, text 112 (līnaŋ cittaŋ hoti); lit. 'stuck fast.'


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