Aŋguttara Nikāya


 

Aŋguttara-Nikāya
III. Tika Nipāta
IV. Deva-Dūta Vagga

The Numerical Discourses of the Buddha
III. The Book of the Threes
IV. Divine Messengers

Sutta 32

Ānanda Suttaɱ

Ānanda

Translated from the Pali by Bhikkhu Bodhi.

© 2012 Bhikkhu Bodhi
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[1][pts][olds][upal][than] Then the Venerable Ānanda approached the Blessed One, paid homage to him, sat down to one side, and said to him:

"Bhante, could a bhikkhu obtain such a state of concentration that

(1) he would have no I-making, mine-making, and underlying tendency to conceit in regard to this conscious body;

(2) he would have no I-making, mine-making, and underlying tendency to conceit in regard to all external objects; and

(3) he would enter and dwell in that liberation of mind, liberation by wisdom, through which there is no more I-making, mine-making, and underlying tendency to conceit for one who enters and dwells in it?"

"He could, Ānanda."

"But how, bhante, could he obtain such a state of concentration?"

"Here, Ānanda, a bhikkhu thinks thus:

'This is peaceful, this is sublime, that is, the stilling of all activities, the relinquishing of all acquisitions, the destruction of craving, dispassion, cessation, nibbāna.'

In this way, Ānanda, a bhikkhu could obtain such a state of concentration that he would have no I-making, mine-making, and underlying tendency to conceit in regard to this conscious body; he would have no I-making, mine-making, and underlying tendency to conceit in regard to all external objects; and he would enter and dwell in that liberation of mind, liberation by wisdom, through which there is no more I-making, mine-making, and underlying tendency to conceit for one who enters and dwells in it.

And it was with reference to this that I said in the Pārāyana, in 'The Questions of Puṇṇaka:

"Having comprehended the highs and lows in the world,
he is not perturbed by anything in the world.
Peaceful, fumeless, untroubled, wishless,
he has, I say, crossed over birth and old age."


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