Aŋguttara Nikāya


 

Aŋguttara-Nikāya
III. Tika Nipāta
IV. Deva-Dūta Vagga

The Numerical Discourses of the Buddha
III. The Book of the Threes
IV. Divine Messengers

Sutta 32 (WP 33)

Sāriputta Suttaɱ

Sāriputta

Translated from the Pali by Bhikkhu Bodhi.

© 2012 Bhikkhu Bodhi
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[2][pts][olds][upal] Then the Venerable Sāriputta approached the Blessed One, paid homage to him, and sat down to one side.

The Blessed One then said to him:

"Sāriputta I can teach the Dhamma briefly; I can teach the Dhamma in detail; I can teach the Dhamma both briefly and in detail.

It is those who can understand that are rare."

It is the time for this, Blessed One.

It is the time for this, Fortunate One.

The Blessed One should teach the Dhamma briefly; he should teach the Dhamma in detail; he should teach the Dhamma both briefly and in detail.

There will be those who can understand the Dhamma."

"Therefore, Sāriputta you should train yourselves thus:

(1) 'There will be no I-making, mine-making, and underlying tendency to conceit in regard to this conscious body;

(2) there will be no I-making, mine-making, and underlying tendency to conceit in regard to all external objects; and

(3) we will enter and dwell in that liberation of mind, liberation by wisdom, through which there is no more I-making, mine-making, and underlying tendency to conceit for one who enters and dwells in it.'

It is in this way, Sāriputta that you should train yourselves.

"When, Sāriputta a bhikkhu has no I-making, mine-making, and underlying tendency to conceit in regard to this conscious body; when he has no I-making, mine-making, and underlying tendency to conceit in regard to all external objects; and when he enters and dwells in that liberation of mind, liberation by wisdom, through which there is no more I-making, mine-making, and underlying tendency to conceit for one who enters and dwells in it, he is called a bhikkhu who has cut off craving, stripped off the fetter, and by completely breaking through conceit, has made an end of suffering.

And it was with reference to this that I said in the Pārāyana, in 'The Questions of Udaya':

"The abandoning of both
sensual perceptions and dejection;
the dispelling of dullness,
the warding off of remorse;

with equanimity and mindfulness purified,
preceded by reflection on the Dhamma:
this, I say, is emancipation by final knowledge,
the breaking up of ignorance."


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