Aŋguttara Nikāya


 

Aŋguttara Nikāya
4. Catukka Nipāta
III. Uruvelā Vagga

The Numerical Discourses of the Buddha
IV. The Book of the Fours
III. Uruvelā

Sutta 21

Paṭhama Uruvelā Suttaɱ

Uruvelā (1)

Translated from the Pali by Bhikkhu Bodhi.

© 2012 Bhikkhu Bodhi
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[20] [406]

[1][pts] Thus have I heard.

On one occasion the Blessed One was dwelling at Sāvatthī in Jeta's Grove, Anāthapiṇḍika's Park.

There the Blessed One addressed the bhikkhus:

"Bhikkhus!"

"Venerable sir!" those bhikkhus replied.

The Blessed One said this:

"Bhikkhus, on one occasion I was dwelling at Uruvelā, by the goatherds' banyan tree on the bank of the Neranjarā River, just after I had attained full enlightenment.

Then, while I was alone in seclusion, a course of thought arose in my mind thus:

'It is painful to dwell without reverence and deference.

Now what ascetic or brahmin can I honor, respect, and dwell in dependence on?'

"Then it occurred to me:

(1) 'If my aggregate of virtuous behavior were incomplete, for the sake of completing it I would honor, respect, and dwell in dependence on another ascetic or brahmin.

However, in this world with its devas, Māra, and Brahmā, among this population with its ascetics and brahmins, its devas and humans, I do not see another ascetic or brahmin more accomplished in virtuous behavior than myself whom I could honor, respect, and dwell in dependence on.

(2) "'If my aggregate of concentration were incomplete, for the sake of completing it I would honor, respect, and dwell in dependence on another ascetic or brahmin.

However ... I do not see another ascetic or brahmin more accomplished in concentration than myself....

(3) "'If my aggregate of wisdom were incomplete, for the sake of completing it I would honor, respect, and dwell in dependence on another ascetic or brahmin.

However ... I do not see another ascetic or brahmin more accomplished in wisdom than myself....

(4) "'If my aggregate of liberation were incomplete, for the sake of completing it I would honor, respect, and dwell in dependence on another ascetic or brahmin.

However, in this world with its devas, Māra, and Brahmā, among this population with its ascetics and brahmins, its devas and humans, I do not see another ascetic or brahmin more accomplished in liberation than myself whom I could honor, respect, and dwell in dependence on.

"It occurred to me:

'Let me then honor, respect, and dwell in dependence only on this Dhamma to which I have become fully enlightened.'

"Then Brahmā Sahampati, [21] having known with his own mind the reflection in my mind, disappeared from the Brahmā world and reappeared before me just as a strong man might extend his drawn-in arm or draw in his extended arm.

He arranged his upper robe over one shoulder, bent down with his right knee on the ground, reverently saluted me, and said:

'So it is, Blessed One!

So it is, Fortunate One!

Bhante, those who were the Arahants, the Perfectly Enlightened Ones in the past — those Blessed Ones, too, honored, respected, and dwelled in dependence only on the Dhamma.

Those who will be the Arahants, the Perfectly Enlightened Ones in the future — those Blessed Ones, too, will honor, respect, and dwell in dependence only on the Dhamma.

Let the Blessed One, too, who is at present the Arahant, the Perfectly Enlightened One, honor, respect, and dwell in dependence only on the Dhamma.'

"This is what Brahmā Sahampati said.

Having said this, he further said this:

"'The perfect Buddhas of the past,
the Buddhas of the future,
and the present Buddha
who removes the sorrow of many:

all those dwelled, now dwell,
and [in the future] will dwell
revering the good Dhamma.
This is the nature of the Buddhas.

"'Therefore one desiring the good,
aspiring for greatness,
should revere the good Dhamma,
recollecting the Buddhas' teaching."

"This was what Brahmā Sahampati said.

He then paid homage to me, and keeping me on his right, he disappeared right there.

Then, having acknowledged Brahmā's request and what was proper for myself, I honored, respected, and dwelled in dependence only on the Dhamma to which I had become fully enlightened.

And now that the Saŋghahas acquired greatness, I have respect for the Saŋgha, too."


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