Aŋguttara Nikāya


 

Aŋguttara Nikāya
X. Dasaka-Nipāta
I. Ānisaŋsa Vagga

The Numerical Discourses of the Buddha
X. The Book of the Tens
I. Benefits

Sutta 2

Cetanā-Karaṇīya Suttaɱ

Volition

Translated from the Pali by Bhikkhu Bodhi.

© 2012 Bhikkhu Bodhi
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[1] [1340]

[1][pts] Thus have I heard.

On one occasion the Blessed One was dwelling at Sāvatthī in Jeta's Grove, Anāthapiṇḍika's Park.

Then the Venerable Ānanda approached the Blessed One, paid homage to him, sat down to one side, and said to him:

1. (1)–(2) "Bhikkhus, for a virtuous person, one whose behavior is virtuous, no volition need be exerted:

'Let non-regret arise in me.'

It is natural that non-regret arises in a virtuous person, one whose behavior is virtuous.

2. (3) "For one without regret no volition need be exerted:

'Let joy arise in me.'

It is natural that joy arises in one without regret.

3. (4) "For one who is joyful no volition need be exerted:

'Let rapture arise in me.'

It is natural that rapture arises in one who is joyful.

4. (5) "For one with a rapturous mind no volition need be exerted:

'Let my body be tranquil.'

It is natural that the body of one with a rapturous mind is tranquil.

5. (6) "For one tranquil in body no volition need be exerted:

'Let me feel pleasure.'

It is natural that one tranquil in body feels pleasure.

6. (7) "For one feeling pleasure no volition need be exerted:

'Let my mind be concentrated.'

It is natural that the mind of one feeling pleasure is concentrated.

7. (8) "For one who is concentrated no volition need be exerted:

'Let me know and see things as they really are.'

It is natural that one who is concentrated knows and sees things as they really are.

8. (9) "For one who knows and sees things as they really are no volition need be exerted:

'Let me be disenchanted and dispassionate.'

It is natural that one who knows and sees things as they really are is disenchanted and dispassionate.

9. (10) "For one who is disenchanted and dispassionate no volition need be exerted:

'Let me realize the knowledge and vision of liberation.'

It is natural that one who is disenchanted and dispassionate realizes the knowledge and vision of liberation.

10. "Thus, bhikkhus, (9)–(10) the knowledge and vision of liberation is the purpose and benefit of disenchantment and dispassion;
(8) disenchantment and dispassion are the purpose and benefit of the knowledge and vision of things as they really are;
(7) the knowledge and vision of things as they really are is the purpose and benefit of concentration;
(6) concentration is the purpose and benefit of pleasure;
(5) pleasure is the purpose and benefit of tranquility;
(4) tranquility is the purpose and benefit of rapture;
(3) rapture is the purpose and benefit of joy;
(2) joy is the purpose and benefit of non-regret; and
(1) non-regret is the purpose and benefit of virtuous behavior.

11. "Thus, bhikkhus, one stage flows into the next stage, one stage fills up the next stage, for going from the near shore to the far shore."


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