Aŋguttara Nikāya


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Aŋguttara Nikāya
X. Dasaka-Nipāta
I. Ānisaŋsa Vagga

The Book of the Gradual Sayings
X. The Book of the Tens
I. Profit

Sutta 2

Cetanā-Karaṇīya Suttaɱ

Thinking with Intention

Translated from the Pali by F. L. Woodward, M.A.

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[2] [3]

[1][bodh] "Monks, for one who is virtuous,
in full possession of virtue,
there is no need for the purposeful thought:[1]

'May freedom from remorse arise in me.'

This, monks, is in accordance with nature
— that for one who is virtuous,
in full possession of virtue,
freedom from remorse arises.

Monks, for one who is free from remorse
there is no need for the purposeful thought:

'May joy arise in me.'

This, monks, is in accordance with nature[2]
— that for one who is free from remorse
joy arises.

Monks, for one who is joyous
there is no need for the purposeful thought:

'May rapture arise in me.'

[3] This, monks, is in accordance with nature
— that for one who is joyous
rapture arises.

Monks, for one whose heart is enraptured[3]
there is no need for the purposeful thought:

'May my body be calmed.'

This, monks, is in accordance with nature
— that for one whose heart is enraptured
the body is calmed.

Monks, for one whose body is calmed
there is no need for the thought:[4]

'I feel happiness.'

This, monks, is in accordance with nature
— that one whose body is calmed
feels happiness.

Monks, for one who is happy
there is no need for the thought:

'My mind is concentrated.'

It follows that the happy man's mind is concentrated.

[4] Monks, for one who is concentrated
there is no need for the thought:

'I know and see things as they really are.'

It follows naturally that one concentrated does so.[5]

Monks, for one who knows and sees things as they really are
there is no need for the thought:

'I feel revulsion;
interest fades in me.'

It follows naturally that such an one
feels revulsion and fading interest.

Monks, for one who feels revulsion and fading interest
there is no need for the thought:

'I realize release by knowing and seeing.'

It follows naturally that he who feels revulsion and fading interest
realizes release by knowing and seeing.

 

§

 

So you see, monks,
revulsion and fading of interest
have release by knowing and seeing as object and profit;
seeing and knowing (things) as they really are,
have revulsion and fading interest as object and profit;
concentration has knowing and seeing things as they really are as object and profit;
happiness has concentration as object and profit;
calm has happiness;
rapture has calm;
joy has rapture;
freedom from remorse has joy;
good conduct has freedom from remorse as its object,
freedom from remorse as its profit.

[2] Thus, monks, one state just causes another state to swell,
one state just causes the fulfilment of another state,[6]
for the sake of going from the not-beyond to the beyond.'[7]

 


[1] Na cetanāya karaṇīyaŋ. For cetanā (thinking with intention) see Mrs. Rhys Davids's note at Buddh. Psych. Ethics, n. to § 5. This section, equal to the first of the Elevens, is quoted at Netti, p. 144. with cetanā karaṇīyā and jāyeyya in each case for uppajjatu of our text; while all its verbs are in the optative, mood.

[2] Dhammatā esā.

[3] Pītī-manassa.

[4] Up to this point, as noted above, the verbs are optative; the rest are in the indicative mood. I have therefore dropped the word 'purposeful' qualifying cetanāya.

[5] Cf. Expositor, 157.

[6] Dhammā'va dhamme abhisandenti ... aripūrenti: cf. D. i. 73, so imaŋ kāyaŋ vivekajena pīti-sukhena abhisandeti parisandeti paripūreti parippharati.

[7] Apārā pāraŋ gamanāya. Here Comy. 'for the purose of going from the this-side-become three-dimensioned round to the nibbāna-beyond.' Cf. K.S. v, 225, where this is mistranslated.


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