Aŋguttara Nikāya


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Aŋguttara-Nikāya
III. Tika Nipāta
VII. Mahā Vagga

The Book of the Gradual Sayings
or
More-Numbered Suttas

III. The Book of the Threes
VII. The Great Chapter

Sutta 68

Añña-Titthiya Suttaɱ

Those of Other Views

Translated from the Pali by
F.L. Woodward, M.A.

Copyright The Pali Text Society
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[180]

[1][than] "Monks, if the Wanderers of other views
should thus question you:

'Friends, there are these three conditions.

What three?

Lust,
malice,
delusion.

These are the three.

[181] Now between these three
what is the distinction,
what is their specific feature,[1]
what is the difference?'

Thus questioned, monks,
how would ye explain it
to those Wanderers of other views?

"For us, lord,
things are rooted in the Exalted One,
have the Exalted One
for their guide and resort.

Well for us, lord,
if the Exalted One would reveal unto us
the meaning of this saying he has said.

Hearing the Exalted One, lord,
the monks will bear it in mind."

"Then listen, monks.

Apply your minds closely.

I will speak."

"Even so, lord,"
replied those monks to the Exalted One.

The Exalted One said this:

2. "Now if the Wanderers of other views
should question you:

'Friends, there are these three conditions.

What three?

Lust,
malice,
delusion.

These are the three.

Now between these three
what is the distinction,
what is their specific feature,
what is the difference?'

Thus do ye explain it:

'Reverend sirs,
lust is slightly to be blamed,[2]
but it is slow to change.

Malice is much to be blamed,
but it is quick to change.

Delusion is much to be blamed
and it is slow to change.'

3. Then if the Wanderers of other views
should question you further:

'But, sirs,
what is the reason,
what is the cause
why lust that has not yet arisen arises,
or why lust that has arisen
is liable to more-becoming and growth?'

'It is the feature[3] of beauty (in a thing),'
must be the reply.

'In him who gives not systematic attention
to the feature of beauty,
lust that has not yet arisen arises,
and lust that has arisen
is liable to more-becoming and growth.

This, sirs, is the reason,
this is the cause
why lust that has not yet arisen arises,
or why lust that has arisen
is liable to more-becoming and growth.'

4. Then if the Wanderers of other views should question you further:

'But, sirs, what is the reason,
what is the cause,
why malice not yet arisen arises,
or why malice that has arisen
is liable to more-becoming and growth?'

'It is the feature of ugliness (in a thing),'
must be the reply.

'In him who gives not systematic attention
to the feature of ugliness,
malice that has not yet arisen arises,
and malice that has arisen
is liable to more-becoming and growth.

This, sirs, is the reason,
this is the cause
why malice that has not yet arisen arises,
or why malice that has arisen
is liable to more-becoming and growth.'

5. Then if the Wanderers of other views should question you further:

'But, sirs, what is the reason
what is the cause,
why delusion not yet arisen arises
or why delusion that has arisen
is liable to more-becoming and growth?'

[182] 'It is unsystematic attention,'
must be the reply.

'In him who gives not systematic attention
delusion that has not yet arisen arises,
and delusion that has arisen
is liable to more-becoming and growth.

This, sirs, is the reason,
this is the cause
why delusion that has not yet arisen arises,
or why delusion that has arisen
is liable to more-becoming and growth.'

6. Then if the Wanderers of other views should question you further:

'Now, sirs, what is the reason,
what is the cause,
why lust not yet arisen arises not,
or if arisen is abandoned?'

'It is the feature of ugliness,'
must be the reply.

'In him who gives systematic attention thereto,
lust not yet arisen arises not,
or lust that has arisen
is abandoned.

This, sirs, is the reason,
this is the cause
why lust that has not yet arisen arises not,
or why lust that has arisen
is abandoned.'

7. Then if the Wanderers of other views should question you further:

'But, sirs, what is the reason,
what is the cause,
why malice not yet arisen arises not,
or why malice that has arisen
is abandoned?'

'It is the heart's release by amity,'[4]
must be the reply.

'In him who gives systematic attention
to the heart's release by goodwill
malice that has not arisen arises not,
or malice that has arisen
is abandoned.

This, sirs, is the reason,
this is the cause
why malice that has not yet arisen arises not,
or why malice that has arisen
is abandoned.'

8. Then if the Wanderers of other views should question you further:

'But, sirs, what is the reason,
what is the cause
why delusion that has not yet arisen arises not,
or why delusion that has arisen
is abandoned?'

'Systematic attention,'
must be the reply.

'In him who practises systematic attention
delusion not yet arisen arises not,
or delusion that has arisen
is abandoned.

This, sirs, is the reason,
this is the cause
why delusion that has not yet arisen arises not,
or why delusion that has arisen
is abandoned.'"

 


[1] Text should read adhippāyoso. Cf. infra, text 267; S. iii, 66.

[2] Cf. A. iii, 416 (of dukkha).

[3] Cf. K.S. v, 52 n.; Vis.M. 20.

[4] Cf. K.S. v, 99.


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