Aŋguttara Nikāya


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Aŋguttara-Nikāya
III. Tika Nipāta
IX. Samaṇa Vagga

The Book of the Gradual Sayings
or
More-Numbered Suttas

III. The Book of the Threes
IX. The Recluse

Sutta 85

Paṭhama Sikkha Suttaɱ

Recital (a)

Translated from the Pali by
F.L. Woodward, M.A.

Copyright The Pali Text Society
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[211]

[1][than] Thus have I heard:

On a certain occasion the Exalted One addressed the monks, saying:

"Monks."

"Yes, Lord," replied those monks to the Exalted One.

The Exalted One said this:

"Monks, this recital to be made twice a month
amounts to more than one hundred and fifty rules
wherein are trained
clansmen who are eager for their welfare.

Now all these combine together[1]
to make these three forms of training.

What three?

The higher morality,
the higher thought
and the higher insight.

Herein are combined
one and all of these rules.

 

§

 

2. Now, Monks, in this matter
a monk keeps the laws of morality in full,
he is moderately given[2] to mental concentration,
moderately given to striving for insight.

Whatever minor, trifling[3] observances
he may transgress,
he is cleared of them.

Why so?

I do not declare him
to be rendered unfit because of them,
for he strictly observes
the rudiments[4] of the holy life,
the constituents of the holy life:

[212] He is established in morality,
he trains himself in the rules of training
by undertaking them.

Such an one,
by destroying three fetters
is a stream-winner,
one not doomed to the Downfall,
one assured,
one bound for enlightenment.[5]

 

§

 

3. Moreover a monk keeps the laws of morality in full,
he is moderately given to mental concentration,
moderately given to striving for insight.

Whatever minor, trifling observances
he may transgress,
he is cleared of them.

Why so?

I do not declare him
to be rendered unfit because of them,
for he strictly observes
the rudiments of the holy life,
the constituents of the holy life:

He is established in morality,
he trains himself in the rules of training
by undertaking them.

Such an one,
by destroying three fetters
and weakening those of lust,
malice
and delusion,
is a once-returner.

Coming back to this world
just once more
he will make an end of Ill.

 

§

 

4. Moreover a monk keeps the laws of morality in full,
he practises concentration in full,
but he is moderately given to striving for insight.

Whatever minor, trifling observances
he may transgress,
he is cleared of them.

Why so?

I do not declare him
to be rendered unfit because of them,
for he strictly observes
the rudiments of the holy life,
the constituents of the holy life:

He is established in morality,
he trains himself in the rules of training
by undertaking them.

Such an one
by the destruction of the five fetters
that bind to the lower worlds,
takes birth spontaneously (in the Pure Abodes),
there to pass away,
destined never to return thence.

5. Lastly, in this matter
a monk keeps the laws of morality in full,
he practises concentration in full,
he practises the acquiring of insight in full.

Whatever minor, trifling observances
he may transgress,
he is cleared of them.

Why so?

I do not declare him
to be rendered unfit because of them,
for he strictly observes
the rudiments of the holy life,
the constituents of the holy life:

He is established in morality,
he trains himself in the rules of training
by undertaking them.

Such an one, by destroying the āsavas,
in this very life himself comes to know
thoroughly the heart's release,
the release by insight,
and attaining it
abides therein.

 

§

 

Thus, monks, the partial fulfiller (of observances)
attains partially:
the perfect observer
attains in full.

Not barren of result[6]
are these rules of the training,
I declare."

 


[1] Sabbaɱ samodhānaɱ gacchati is used frequently for the fingers of the hand, the rafters joining in the peak, and rivers' confluence in Ocean.

[2] Mattaso-kārī = pamāṇena kārako. Comy.

[3] Khuddānukhuddakāni, those outside the four pārājikāni (or serious offences). Cf. Vin. Texts, i, 3.

[4] Ādibrahmacariyakāni, cf. K.S. v, 354.

[5] cf. K.S. v, 312, etc.

[6] Reading with S. v, 202, etc., and Comy. avañjhāni (= atucchāni, saphalāni). Text here and below has avajjhāni, which does not suit the context.

 


[ed1] See the Outline comparing Suttas 85-86-87.


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