Aŋguttara Nikāya


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Aŋguttara-Nikāya
III. Tika Nipāta
XI. Sambodhi Vagga

The Book of the Gradual Sayings
or
More-Numbered Suttas

Part III
The Book of the Threes

Chapter XI. Enlightenment

Sutta 102

Assāda Suttaɱ

Satisfaction

Translated from the Pali by
F.L. Woodward, M.A.

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[238]

[1] Thus have I heard:

Once the Exalted One was dwelling near Sāvatthī.

There the Exalted One addressed the monks, saying:

"Monks."

"Yes, lord," they replied,
and the Exalted One said:

'Now herein,[1] monks,
if there were not satisfaction to be found in the world,
beings would not be attached to the world.

But since there is satisfaction in the world,
beings are attached thereto.

If there were not misery in the world,
beings would not be repelled by the world.

But since there is misery in the world,
beings are repelled by the world.

If there were no escape from the world,
beings could not escape therefrom.

But since there is an escape from the world,
beings do escape therefrom.

Now, monks, in so far as beings have not fully come to know,
as it really is,
the satisfaction in the world as such,
the misery therein as misery,
the escape therefrom as such,
just so far have they not dwelt free from,[2]
detached from,
released from,
with heart unconfined by[3]
the world
and the devas,
the Maras,
and Brahmās,
together with the host of recluses and brahmins
of devas and mankind.

But, monks, when beings have fully come to know,
as it really is,
the satisfaction in the world as such,
the misery in the world as such,
the escape from the world as such, -
then, monks, they dwell free,
detached,
released from,
with heart unconfined by the world
and the devas,
the Maras,
and Brahmās,
together with the host of recluses and brahmins
of devas and mankind.

Verily, monks, whatsoever recluses or brahmins[4] under- [239] stand not,
as it really is,
the satisfaction,
the misery in the world,
and the escape therefrom,
such recluses and brahmins
in my opinion
are not to be regarded as recluses
among recluses,
nor as brahmins
among brahmins:
nor have those worthies come to know
fully of themselves
in this very life
the real meaning of recluseship
or of brahminhood,
nor attaining thereto
do they dwell therein.

But, monks, whatsoever recluses and brahmins
do so understandas it really is,
the satisfaction,
the misery in the world,
and the escape therefrom,
such recluses and brahmins
are in my opinion
to be regarded as recluses
among recluses,
as brahmins
among brahmins:
and those worthies have come to know
fully of themselves
in this very life
the real meaning of recluseship
or of brahminhood,
and attaining thereto
they dwell therein.'[5]

 


[1] Text no ce taɱ; S. ii, 172 no ce'daɱ, followed by na-y-daɱ, used adverbially, which I think is the better reading.

[2] Text and Comy. nissaṭa (fr. nissarati) ... vippamuttā, which agrees with Comy. on S. ii, 172; but S. text nissaṭṭhā ... vippayuttā.

[3] Vimariyāda-katena cetasā.

[4] cf. K.S. ii, 117.

[5] S. ii, 175 has viharanti.


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