Aŋguttara Nikāya


[Home]  [Sutta Indexes]  [Glossology]  [Site Sub-Sections]


 

Aŋguttara-Nikāya
III. Tika Nipāta
XIII. Kusināra Vagga

The Book of the Gradual Sayings
or
More-Numbered Suttas

Part III
The Book of the Threes

Chapter XIII. At Kusināra

Sutta 122

Strife

Translated from the Pali by
F.L. Woodward, M.A.

Copyright The Pali Text Society
Commercial Rights Reserved
Creative Commons Licence
For details see Terms of Use.

 


[252]

[1] Thus have I heard:

Once the Exalted One was dwelling near Sāvatthī.

There the Exalted One addressed the monks, saying:

"Monks."

"Yes, lord," they replied,
and the Exalted One said:

'In whatsoever quarter
the monks dwell in strife and uproar,
given to disputes
and wounding each other
with the weapons of the tongue,
it is unpleasant for me
even to think of such a quarter,
much more unpleasant for me to go to it.

[253] I come to this conclusion[1] in the matter:

Surely these worthies
have abandoned these three conditions
and have made a habit
of these other three conditions.

What three conditions have they abandoned?

Dispassionate thinking,
benevolent thinking
and harmless thinking.

These are the three.

And of what three conditions have they made a habit?[2]

Sensual thinking,
malevolent thinking,
and harmful thinking.

These are the three.

'In whatsoever quarter
the monks dwell in strife and uproar,
given to disputes
and wounding each other
with the weapons of the tongue,
it is unpleasant for me
even to think of such a quarter,
much more unpleasant for me to go to it.

I come to this conclusion in the matter:

Surely these worthies
have abandoned these three conditions
and have made a habit
of these other three conditions.

 


 

But in whatsoever quarter
the monks dwell in harmony and mutual courtesy,
without wrangling,
but just like milk and water mixed,
regarding each other
with a friendly eye, -
to such a quarter I am glad to go,
not to speak of thinking about it.

This is the conclusion I come to regarding them:

Surely those worthies
have abandoned these three conditions
and have made a habit of these other three conditions.

What three have they abandoned?

Sensual thinking,
malevolent thinking,
harmful thinking.

What three have they made a habit of?

Dispassionate thinking,
benevolent thinking,
harmless thinking.

These are the three.

Monks, in whatsoever quarter
the monks dwell in harmony and mutual courtesy,
without wrangling,
but just like milk and water mixed,
regarding each other
with a friendly eye, -
to such a quarter I am glad to go,
not to speak of thinking about it.

This is the conclusion I come to regarding them:

Surely those worthies
have abandoned these three conditions
and have made a habit of these other three conditions.

 


[1] Niṭṭhaɱ gacchāmi (here Pāli Dict., is wrong in reference and interpretation, S.v. niṭṭhaɱ).

[2] Bahulī-m-akaŋsu = punappunaɱ karonti. Comy.


Contact:
E-mail
Copyright Statement