Aŋguttara Nikāya


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Aŋguttara Nikāya
Pañcaka Nipāta
XXII. Akkosaka-Vagga

The Book of the Gradual Sayings
The Book of the Fives
Chapter XXII: The Abuser

Sutta 213

Sīla Suttaɱ

Morals

Translated by E. M. Hare

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[185]

[1] Thus have I heard:

Once the Exalted One dwelt near Sāvatthī;
and there he addressed the monks, saying:

"Monks."

'Yes, lord,' they replied;
and the Exalted One said:

"Monks,[1] there are these five disadvantages
to one wanting morals,
failing in morals.

What five?

Consider,[2] monks,
the man without morals,
failing in morals —
he comes to suffer much loss in wealth
through neglect.

This, monks, is the first disadvantage
to one wanting morals,
failing in morals.[3]

[186] Or an evil rumour spreads about him.

This is the second disadvantage disadvantage
to one wanting morals,
failing in morals.

Or whatever group he approach,
whether nobles or brāhmans,
householders
or recluses,
he does so without confidence and confused.

This is the third disadvantage
to one wanting morals,
failing in morals.

Or he dies muddled (in thought).[4]

This is the fourth disadvantage
to one wanting morals,
failing in morals.

Or on the breaking up of the body after death
he arises in the wayward way,
the ill way,
the abyss,
hell.

This is the fifth disadvantage
to one wanting morals,
failing in morals.

Verily, monks, these are the five disadvantages to one wanting morals, failing in morals.

 

§

 

Monks, there are these five advantages
to the moral,
perfect in morals.

What five?

Consider, monks,
the moral man,
perfect in morals —
he comes great increase in wealth[ed1]
through earnestness.

This, monks, is the first advantage
to the moral man,
perfect in morals.

Or a lovely rumour spreads about him.

This is the second advantage
to the moral man,
perfect in morals.

Or whatever group he approach,
whether nobles or brāhmans,
householders
or recluses,
he does so with confidence and unconfused.

This is the third advantage
to the moral man,
perfect in morals.

Or he dies unmuddled (in thought).

This is the fourth advantage
to the moral man,
perfect in morals.

Or on the breaking up of the body after death
he arises in the happy world,
the heavon world.

This is the fifth advantage
to the moral man,
perfect in morals.

Verily, monks, these are the five advantages
to the moral man,
perfect in morals.

 


[1] This sutta recurs at D. ii, 85-6; iii, 236; Vin. i, 227-8; Ud. 86; it is noticed at Vism. 54.

[2] Idha.

[3] Sīla-, elsewhere generally trsld. 'virtue.'

[4] Sammūḷha, as before, but here Comy. observes: lying on his deathbed he sees his wicked deeds revolve before him.

 


[ed1] Hare abridges inicating the converse should be understood. But the converse can be expressed in more than one way! I have followed the Pali using his vocabulary as much as possible.


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