Aŋguttara Nikāya


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Aŋguttara Nikāya
VIII. Aṭṭhaka Nipāta
I: Mettā Vagga

The Book of the Gradual Sayings
VIII. The Book of the Eights
I. On Amity

Sutta 6

Dutiya Lokadhamma Suttaɱ

Worldly Failings (b)

Translated from the Pali by E.M. Hare.

Copyright The Pali Text Society
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[157] [108]

[1][than][olds][bodh] Thus have I heard:

Once the Exalted One was dwelling near Sāvatthī,
at Jeta Grove,
in Anāthapiṇḍika's Park.

There the Exalted One addressed the monks, saying:

"Monks."

"Yes, lord," they replied, and the Exalted One said:

"Monks, these eight worldly conditions obsess the world;
the world revolves round
these eight worldly conditions.

What eight?

Gain and loss,
fame and obscurity,
blame and praise,
contentment and pain.

Monks, these eight worldly conditions obsess the world,
the world revolves round
these eight worldly conditions.

 

§

 

Monks, to the unlearned common average folk
come gain,
loss,
fame,
obscurity,
blame,
praise,
contentment,
pain.

To the learned Ariyan disciple also come gain,
loss,
fame,
obscurity,
blame,
praise,
contentment,
pain.

Here then, monks, what is the distinction,
what is the peculiarity[1] of,
and what is the difference between the Ariyan disciple
and common average folk?

'Lord, our doctrines have tbeir foundation in the Exalted One,
they are guided by the Exalted One,
they have the Exalted's One's protection!

Well indeed were it for us,
if the Exalted One would expound the meaning of his speech to us.

Then, when the monks have beard the Exalted One,
they will treasure his words in tbeir hearts.'[2]

'Then listen, monks,
give heed,
I will speak.'

"Yes, lord," they replied,
and the Exalted One said:

"Monks, gain comes to the unlearned common average folk,
who reflect not thus:

"This gain, which has come,
is impermanent,
painful
and subject to change."

They know it not as it really is.

This loss, which has come,
is impermanent,
painful
and subject to change."

They know it not as it really is.

This fame, which has come,
is impermanent,
painful
and subject to change."

They know it not as it really is.

This obscurity, which has come,
is impermanent,
painful
and subject to change."

They know it not as it really is.

This blame, which has come,
is impermanent,
painful
and subject to change."

They know it not as it really is.

This praise, which has come,
is impermanent,
painful
and subject to change."

They know it not as it really is.

This contentment, which has come,
is impermanent,
painful
and subject to change."

They know it not as it really is.

This pain, which has come,
is impermanent,
painful
and subject to change."

They know it not as it really is.

Gain,
loss,
fame,
obscurity,
blame,
praise,
contentment,
pain
take possession of their minds
and hold sway there.

They welcome the gain, which has arisen;
they rebel against loss.

They welcome the fame, which has arisen;
they rebel against obscurity.

They welcome the praise, which has arisen;
they rebel against blame.

They welcome the contentment, which has arisen;
they rebel against pain.

Thus given over to compliance and hostility,
they are not freed-from birth,
old age,
death,
sorrows,
lamentations,
pains,
miseries
and tribulations.

I say such folk are not free from ill.'

 

§

 

"Monks, gain comes to the learned Ariyan disciple,
who reflects:

"This gain, which has come,
is impermanent,
painful
and subject to change."

He knows it as it really is.

This loss, which has come,
is impermanent,
painful
and subject to change."

He knows it as it really is.

This fame, which has come,
is impermanent,
painful
and subject to change."

He knows it as it really is.

This obscurity, which has come,
is impermanent,
painful
and subject to change."

He knows it as it really is.

This blame, which has come,
is impermanent,
painful
and subject to change."

He knows it as it really is.

This praise, which has come,
is impermanent,
painful
and subject to change."

He knows it as it really is.

This contentment, which has come,
is impermanent,
painful
and subject to change."

He knows it as it really is.

This pain, which has come,
is impermanent,
painful
and subject to change."

He knows it as it really is.

Gain,
loss,
fame,
obscurity,
blame,
praise,
contentment,
pain
does not take possession of his mind
and hold sway there.

He does not welcome the gain, which has arisen;
he does not rebel against loss.

He does not welcome the fame, which has arisen;
he does not rebel against obscurity.

He does not welcome the praise, which has arisen;
he does not rebel against blame.

He does not welcome the contentment, which has arisen;
he does not rebel against pain.

Thus not given over to compliance and hostility,
he is freed-from birth,
old age,
death,
sorrows,
lamentations,
pains,
miseries
and tribulations.

I say he is free from ill.'

This then, monks, is the distinction,
this is the peculiarity of,
and the difference between the Ariyan disciple
and common average folk.

 


 

Gain, loss, obscurity and fame,
And censure, praise, contentment, pain -
These are man's states - impermanent,
Of time and subject unto change.
And recognizing these the sage,
Alert, discerns these things of change;
Fair things his mind ne'er agitate,
Nor foul his spirit vex. Gone are
Compliance and hostility,
Gone up in smoke and are no more. The goal he knows. In measure full
He knows the stainless, griefiess state.
Beyond becoming hath he gone.'

 


[1] Adhippāyoso; see p. 467 of text, where Comy. adhippāya; but S.e. adhikapayogo, as at A. i, 267, n. 1. The phrase recurs at A. and S. iii, 66.

[2] This passage recurs at M. i, 310; A. i, 199; v, 355; S. v, 218; below, pp. 221 and 231, and passim.


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