Aŋguttara Nikāya


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Aŋguttara Nikāya
VIII. Aṭṭhaka Nipāta
VIII. Yamaka-Vagga

The Book of the Gradual Sayings
VIII. The Book of the Eights
Chapter VIII: The Pairs

Sutta 78

Alaɱ Suttaɱ

Enough[ed1]

Translated from the Pali by E.M. Hare.

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[216]

[1] Thus have I heard:

Once the Venerable Sāriputta was dwelling near Sāvatthī.

There the Venerable Sāriputta addressed the monks, saying:

"Friends, Monks."

'Yes, friend,' they replied, and Venerable Sāriputta said:

2. 'Friends, Monks, possessed of six qualities
a monk is enough[1] for self,
enough for others.

What six?

3. Herein a monk is quick[2] to grasp the subtle doctrines;[3]
he remembers those heard;
reflects on the meaning of those remembered;
knowing both the letter and the spirit,
walks in conformity with Dhamma;
has a pleasant voice,
a good enunciation,
is urbane in speech,
distinct,
free from hoarseness
and informative;
he is one who instructs,
incites,
rouses
and gladdens his fellows in the godly life.

Possessed of these six
a monk is enough for self,
enough for others.

4. So likewise of five qualities
a monk is enough for self,
enough for others.

What five?

5. He is not very quick in grasping the subtle doctrines;
but he remembers those heard;
reflects on the meaning of those remembered;
knowing both the letter and the spirit,
walks in conformity with Dhamma;
has a pleasant voice,
a good enunciation,
is urbane in speech,
distinct,
free from hoarseness
and informative;
he is one who instructs,
incites,
rouses
and gladdens his fellows in the godly life.

Possessed of these five
he is enough for self,
enough for others.

6. Possessed of four qualities
a monk is enough for self,
but not for others.

What four?

7. He is quick to grasp the subtle doctrines;
remembers those heard;
reflects on those remembered;
knowing both the letter and the spirit,
walks in conformity with Dhamma;
but he has not a pleasant voice
a good enunciation,
urbane in speech,
distinct,
free from hoarseness
and informative;
nor is he one who instructs,
incites,
rouses
and gladdens his fellows in the godly life.

With these four he is enough for self, but not for others.

8. Possessed of four qualities he is enough for others,
but not for self.

What four?

9. He is quick to grasp the subtle doctrines;
remembers them;
but does not reflect on them;
knowing neither the letter nor the spirit,
he does not walk in conformity with Dhamma;
yet he has a pleasant voice,
a good enunciation,
is urbane in speech,
distinct,
free from hoarseness
and informative;
he is one who instructs,
incites,
rouses
and gladdens his fellows in the godly life.

With these four he is enough for others,
but not for self.

10. Possessed of three qualities he is enough for self,
but not for others.

What three?

11. He is not quick to grasp the subtle doctrines;
but remembers them;
reflects upon them;
knowing both the letter and the spirit,
walks in conformity with Dhamma;
but he has not a pleasant voice
a good enunciation,
urbane in speech,
distinct,
free from hoarseness
and informative;
nor is he one who instructs,
incites,
rouses
and gladdens his fellows in the godly life.

With these three he is enough for self,
but not for others.

12. Possessed of three qualities he is enough for others, but not for self.

What three?

13. He is not quick to grasp the subtle doctrines;
but remembers them;
yet does not reflect on them;
knowing neither the letter nor the spirit,
he does not walk in conformity with Dhamma;
yet he has a pleasant voice,
a good enunciation,
is urbane in speech,
distinct,
free from hoarseness
and informative;
he is one who instructs,
incites,
rouses
and gladdens his fellows in the godly life.

With these three he is enough for others,
but not for self.

14. Possessed with two qualities he is enough for self,
but not for others.

What two?

15. He is not quick to grasp the subtle doctrines;
does not remember them;
but reflects on them;
knowing both the letter and the spirit,
walks in conformity with Dhamma;
but he has not a pleasant voice
a good enunciation,
urbane in speech,
distinct,
free from hoarseness
and informative;
nor is he one who instructs,
incites,
rouses
and gladdens his fellows in the godly life.

With these two he is enough for self,
but not for others.

16. Monks, possessed of two qualities a monk is enough for others,
but not for self.

What two?

17. Herein a monk is not very quick to grasp the subtle doctrines;
he does not remember those heard;
nor reflect on the meaning of those remembered;
knowing neither the letter nor the spirit,
he does not walk in conformity with Dhamma;
but he has a pleasant voice,
a good enunciation,
is urbane in speech,
distinct,
free from hoarseness
and informative;
he is one who instructs,
incites,
rouses
and gladdens
his fellows in the godly life.

Possessed of these two qualities a monk is enough for others,
but not for self.

 


[1] Alaɱ. Comy. samattho, pariyatto, anucchaviko.

[2] Khippanisanti. Comy. He quickly grasps and knows the doctrines of the skandhas, elements, spheres, etc. (for which see DhS. trsl., § 1333). For the whole passage cf. A. ii, 97; v, 155; above, p. 149.

[3] Kusalesu dhammesu.

 


[ed1] Hare has abridged this sutta with the note: (The venerable Sāriputta preaches sutta 62 of the Eights). It is fully reproduced here including the footnotes.


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