Majjhima Nikaya


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Majjhima Nikāya
II. Majjhima-Paṇṇāsa
3. Paribbājaka Vagga

The Middle Length Sayings
II. The Middle Fifty Discourses
3. The Division on Wanderers

Sutta 78

Samaṇamaṇḍikā Suttaɱ

Discourse to Samaṇamaṇḍikā's Son

The Middle Length Sayings

Translated from the Pali by I.B. Horner, M.A.
Associate of Newham College, Cambridge
First Published in 1954

Copyright The Pali Text Society
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[1][chlm][than][upal] THUS have I heard:

At one time the Lord was staying near Sāvatthī
in the Jeta Grove in Anāthapiṇḍika's monastery.

Now at that time the wanderer Uggāhamāna, Samaṇamaṇḍikā's son,
was staying in the One Hall,
set round with a row of tinduka trees,[1]
in Malhkā's park
which was intended for discussion,[2]
together with a company of wanderers
numbering at least three hundred.[3]

Then early one morning the carpenter Pancakaŋga left Sāvatthī
so as to see the Lord.

Then it occurred to Pancakaŋga the carpenter:

"It is not yet the right time to see the Lord.

The Lord has withdrawn.

Nor is it the season
to see the monks who are developing their minds.[4]

The monks who are developing their minds
have withdrawn.

Suppose that I were to approach Mallikā's park,
which is intended for discussion,
the One Hall,
set round with a row of tinduka trees,
and Uggāhamāna the wanderer, Samaṇamaṇḍikā's son?"[5]

Then [223] Pancakaŋga the carpenter approached Mallikā's park,
which is intended for discussion,
the One Hall,
set round with a row of tinduka trees,
and Uggāhamāna the wanderer, Samaṇamaṇḍikā's son.

At that time Uggāhamāna was sitting down
with a great company of wanderers
shouting out with a loud noise,
a great noise,[6]
talking various kinds of inferior talk
that is to say
talk on kings,
thieves,
great ministers,
armies,
fears,
battles,
food,
drink,
clothes,
beds,
garlands,
scents,
relations,
vehicles,
villages,
market towns,
towns,
the country,
women,
heroes,
streets,
wells,
those departed before,
talk of diversity,
speculation about the world,
speculation about the sea,
talk about becoming or not becoming
thus or thus.

Uggāhamāna saw the carpenter Pancakaŋga coming in the distance;
seeing him,
he called his own company to order,
saying;

"Good sirs, let there be little noise;
do not, good sirs, make a noise;
this is a disciple of the recluse Gotama who is coming -
the carpenter Pancakaŋga.

For as long as white-frocked householders,
disciples of the recluse Gotama,
have been staying at Sāvatthī,
the carpenter Pancakaŋga has been among them.

These venerable ones wish for little noise,
they are trained to little noise,
they are praisers of little noise.

So, if he knows that this is a company of little noise,
he may consider approaching."

Then these wanderers fell silent.

Then Pancakaŋga the carpenter
approached Uggāhamāna;
having approached
he exchanged greetings with Uggāhamāna;
having conversed in a friendly and courteous way,
he sat down at a respectful distance.

Uggāhamāna spoke thus to Pancakaŋga the carpenter
as he was sitting down at a respectful distance:

"I, carpenter, lay down
that an individual who is endowed with four qualities
is abounding in skill,
of the highest skill,
an unconquerable recluse
attained to the utmost attainments.

With what four?

As to this, carpenter,
he does no evil deed with his body,
he speaks no evil speech,
he intends no evil intention,
he leads no evil mode of livelihood.

I lay down, carpenter,
that if an individual is endowed with these four qualities
he is abounding in skill,
of the highest skill,
an unconquerable recluse
attained to the utmost attainments."

But the carpenter Pancakaŋga
neither rejoiced in what Uggāhamāna had said
nor scoffed.

Neither rejoicing nor scoffing,
rising from his seat,
he departed,
thinking:

"I will discover the meaning of what was said
in the Lord's presence."

Then Pancakaŋga the carpenter
approached the Lord;
having approached,
having greeted the Lord,
he sat down at a respectful distance.

As he ivas sitting down at a respectful distance
Pancakaŋga the carpenter told the Lord
the whole of the conversation he had had with Uggāhamāna.

This said, the Lord spoke thus to Pancakaŋga the carpenter:

"This being so, carpenter,
then according to the speech of Uggāhamāna
a young baby boy
lying on its back[7] would be of [224] abounding skill,
of the highest skill,
an unconquerable recluse
attained to the utmost attainments.

For, carpenter,
a young baby boy lying on its back
does not think of its own body.[8]

How then could it do an evil deed with its body,
except for a little kicking about?

A young baby boy, carpenter,
lying on its back
does not think of its own voice.

How then could it utter an evil speech,
except for a little crying?

A young baby boy, carpenter,
lying on its back
does not think about its own intention.

How then could it intend an evil intention,
except for a little excitement?[9]

A young baby boy, carpenter,
lying on its back
does not think of its own mode of livelihood.

How then could it lead an evil mode of livelihood,
except for taking its mother's milk?

This being so, carpenter,
then according to the speech of Uggāhamāna
a young baby boy lying on its back
would be of abounding skill,
of the highest skill,
an unconquerable recluse
attained to the utmost attainments.

Now I, carpenter, lay down
that an individual,
endowed with four qualities,
is neither of abounding skill
nor of the highest skill
nor is he an unconquerable recluse
attained to the utmost attainments;
and that these moreover
merely distinguish[10]
a young baby boy lying on its back.

With what four?

As to this, carpenter,
he does no evil deed with his body,
he utters no evil speech,
he intends no evil intention,
he leads no evil mode of livelihood.

I, carpenter, lay down
that if an individual is endowed
with these four qualities
he is neither abounding in skill,
nor of the highest skill,
nor an unconquerable recluse
attained to the utmost attainments;
and that these moreover
merely distinguish
a young baby boy lying on its back.

I, carpenter, lay down
that an individual,
endowed with ten qualities,
is abounding in skill,
of the highest skill,
an unconquerable recluse
attained to the utmost attainments.

I say it is to be understood for him,[11] carpenter,
that these[12] are unskilled moral habits.

I say it is to be understood for him, carpenter,
that hence-originating
are unskilled moral habits.

I say it is to be understood for him, carpenter,
that here unskilled moral habits
are stopped without remainder.

I say it is to be understood for him, carpenter,
that [225] faring along thus,
he is faring along
for the stopping of unskilled moral habits.

I say it is to be understood for him, carpenter,
that these are skilled moral habits.

I say it is to be understood for him, carpenter,
that hence-originating
are skilled moral habits.

I say it is to be understood for him, carpenter,
that here skilled moral habits
are stopped without remainder.

I say it is to be understood for him, carpenter,
that faring along thus,
he is faring along
for the stopping of skilled moral habits.

I say it is to be understood for him, carpenter,
that these are unskilled intentions.

I say it is to be understood for him, carpenter,
that hence-originating
are unskilled intentions.

I say it is to be understood for him, carpenter,
that here unskilled intentions
are stopped without remainder.

I say it is to be understood for him, carpenter,
that faring along thus,
he is faring along
for the stopping of unskilled intentions.

I say it is to be understood for him, carpenter,
that these are skilled intentions.

I say it is to be understood for him, carpenter,
that hence-originating
are skilled intentions.

I say it is to be understood for him, carpenter,
that here skilled intentions
are stopped without remainder.

I say it is to be understood for him, carpenter,
that faring along thus,
he is faring along
for the stopping of skilled intentions.

And which, carpenter, are the unskilled moral habits?

Unskilled deed of body,
unskilled deed of speech,
evil mode of livelihood -
these, carpenter, are called
unskilled moral habits.

And how, carpenter,
do these unskilled moral habits originate?

Their origination is spoken of too.

It should be answered that
the origination is in the mind.[13]

Which mind?

For the mind is manifold,
various,
diverse.

That mind[14] which has attachment,
aversion,
confusion -
originating from this
are unskilled moral habits.

But where,[15] carpenter,
are these unskilled moral habits
stopped without remainder?

Their stopping is spoken of too.

As to this, carpenter, a monk,
getting rid of wrong conduct in body,
develops right conduct in body;
getting rid of wrong conduct in speech,
he develops right conduct in speech;
getting rid of wrong conduct in thought,
he develops right conduct in thought;
getting rid of a wrong mode of livelihood,
he leads his life with a right mode of livelihood.

It is thus that these unskilled moral habits
are stopped without remainder.

And faring along in what way, carpenter,
is he faring along
for the stopping of unskilled moral habits?

As to this, carpenter,
a monk generates desire,[16]
he endeavours,
stirs up energy,
exerts his mind
and strives
for the non-arising of evil unskilled states of mind
that have not arisen.

He generates desire,
he endeavours,
stirs up energy,
exerts his mind
and strives
for the getting rid of evil unskilled states of mind
that have arisen

He generates desire,
he endeavours,
stirs up energy,
exerts his mind
and strives
for the arising of skilled states of mind
that have not arisen

He generates desire,
he endeavours,
stirs up energy,
exerts his mind
and strives
for the maintenance,
preservation,
increase,
maturity,
development
and completion
of skilled states of mind that have [226] arisen.

Faring along thus, carpenter,
he is faring along
for the stopping of unskilled moral habits.

And which, carpenter,
are the skilled moral habits?

Skilled deed of body,
skilled deed of speech;
and I, carpenter, say
that included in moral habit
is entire purity of mode of livelihood.

These, carpenter, are called
skilled moral habits.

And how, carpenter,
do these skilled moral habits originate?

Their origination is spoken of too.

It should be answered that
the origination is in the mind.

Which mind?

For the mind is manifold,
various,
diverse.

That mind which is devoid of attachment,
devoid of aversion,
devoid of confusion -
originating from this
are the skilled moral habits.

And where, carpenter,
are these skilled moral habits
stopped without remainder?

Their stopping is spoken of too.

As to this, carpenter,
a monk is of moral habit
and has no addition to make to moral habit,[17]
and he comprehends that freedom of mind,
that freedom through intuitive wisdom
as they really are.

Herein[18] are these skilled moral habits of his
stopped without remainder.

And faring along in what way, carpenter,
is he faring along
for the stopping of skilled moral habits?

As to this, carpenter,
a monk generates desire,
he endeavours,
stirs up energy,
exerts his mind
and strives
for the non-arising of evil unskilled states of mind
that have not arisen.

He generates desire,
he endeavours,
stirs up energy,
exerts his mind
and strives
for the getting rid of evil unskilled states of mind
that have arisen

He generates desire,
he endeavours,
stirs up energy,
exerts his mind
and strives
for the arising of skilled states of mind
that have not arisen

He generates desire,
he endeavours,
stirs up energy,
exerts his mind
and strives
for the maintenance,
preservation,
increase,
maturity,
development
and completion
of skilled states of mind that have arisen.

Faring along thus, carpenter,
he is faring along
for the stopping of skilled moral habits.

And which, carpenter, are unskilled intentions?

Intention for sense-pleasures,
intention for malevolence,
intention for harming.

These, carpenter, are called
unskilled intentions.

And how, carpenter, do these unskilled intentions originate?

Their origination is spoken of too.

It should be answered
that their origination is in perception.

Which perception?

For perception is many,
various,
diverse:
perception of sense-pleasures,
perception of malevolence,
perception of harming -
originating from these
are unskilled intentions.

But where, carpenter,
are these unskilled intentions
stopped without remainder?

Their stopping is spoken of too.

As to this, carpenter, a monk,
aloof from the pleasures of the [227] senses,
aloof from unskilled states of mind,
entering into the first meditation
which is accompanied by initial thought
and discursive thought,
is born of aloofness,
and is rapturous and joyful,
abides in it.

Herein are these unskilled intentions
stopped without remainder.

And faring along in what way, carpenter,
is he faring along
for the stopping of unskilled intentions?

As to this, carpenter,
a monk generates desire,
he endeavours,
stirs up energy,
exerts his mind
and strives
for the non-arising of evil unskilled states of mind
that have not arisen.

He generates desire,
he endeavours,
stirs up energy,
exerts his mind
and strives
for the getting rid of evil unskilled states of mind
that have arisen

He generates desire,
he endeavours,
stirs up energy,
exerts his mind
and strives
for the arising of skilled states of mind
that have not arisen

He generates desire,
he endeavours,
stirs up energy,
exerts his mind
and strives
for the maintenance,
preservation,
increase,
maturity,
development
and completion
of skilled states of mind that have arisen.

Faring along thus, carpenter,
he is faring along
for the stopping of unskilled intentions.

And which, carpenter, are skilled intentions?

Intention for renunciation,
intention for non-malevolence,
intention for nonharming.

These, carpenter, are called
skilled intentions.

And how, carpenter,
do these skilled intentions originate?

Their origination is spoken of too.

It should be answered
that their origination is in perception.

Which perception?

For perception is many,
various,
diverse:
perception of renunciation,
perception of non-malevolence,
perception of non-harming -
originating from these
are skilled intentions.

But where, carpenter,
are these skilled perceptions stopped without remainder?

Their stopping is spoken of too.

As to this, carpenter, a monk,
by allaying initial and discursive thought,
his mind subjectively tranquillised
and fixed on one point,
enters on
and abides in
the second meditation
which is devoid of initial and discursive thought,
is born of concentration
and is rapturous and joyful.

Herein are these skilled intentions
stopped without remainder.

And faring along in what way, carpenter,
is he faring along
for the stopping of skilled intentions?

As to this, carpenter,
a monk generates desire,
he endeavours,
stirs up energy,
exerts his mind
and strives
for the non-arising of evil unskilled states of mind
that have not arisen.

He generates desire,
he endeavours,
stirs up energy,
exerts his mind
and strives
for the getting rid of evil unskilled states of mind
that have arisen

He generates desire,
he endeavours,
stirs up energy,
exerts his mind
and strives
for the arising of skilled states of mind
that have not arisen

He generates desire,
he endeavours,
stirs up energy,
exerts his mind
and strives
for the maintenance,
preservation,
increase,
maturity,
development
and completion
of skilled states of mind that have arisen.

Faring along thus, carpenter,
he is faring along
for the stopping of skilled intentions.

And endowed with what ten qualities
do I, carpenter, lay down
that an individual is abounding in skill,
of the highest skill,
an unconquerable recluse
attained to the utmost attainments?

As to this, carpenter,
a monk is endowed with the perfect view of an adept,
he is endowed with the perfect intention of an adept,
he is endowed with the perfect speech of an adept,
he is endowed with the perfect action of an adept,
he is endowed with the perfect mode of livelihood of an adept,
he is endowed with the perfect endeavour of an adept,
he is endowed with the perfect mindfulness of an adept,
he is endowed with the perfect concentration of an adept,
he is endowed with the perfect knowledge of an adept,
he is endowed with the perfect freedom of an adept.

I, carpenter, lay down
that an individual,
endowed with these ten qualities,
is abounding in skill,
[228] of the highest skill,
an unconquerable recluse
attained to the highest attainments."

Thus spoke the Lord.

Delighted, Pancakaŋga the carpenter
rejoiced in what the Lord had said.

Discourse to Samaṇamaṇḍikā ('s son):
The Eighth

 


[1] MA. iii. 266 says that the One Hall, ekasālā, was surrounded by rows of tinduka and timbaru trees. At first there was only the one hall, and although later many more were built for the wanderers, such as Poṭṭhapāda and others, the name of One Hall was retained.

[2] samayappavādake. MA. iii. 266 says this is an ārāma, a park, where brahmans, Jains, unclothed wanderers and so on meet together to discuss and to state their opinions. Samayappavādaka is therefore a descriptive epithet of the park that Mallikā had made for the wanderers, and not "the debating hall" as such.

[3] This sentence is also at D. i. 178.

[4] manobhāvaniyā bhikkhū, as at M. iii. 261; S. iii. 1; Miln.. 129.

[5] Although Uggāhamāna always receives this full title in this Discourse, for the sake of brevity I shall refer to him as Uggāhamāna only.

[6] As in Suttas 76, 77, see above, pp. 192, 203.

[7] Cf. M. i. 394.

[8] kāyo ti pi na hoti. MA. iii. 267 says it does not know the difference between its own body and those of others.

[9] It cries or laughs according to whether it has come from Niraya Hell or a deva-world, MA. iii. 268.

[10] samadhiggayha tiṭṭhati, see above, p. 184, n. 2.

[11] tahaɱ, a locative of ta.

[12] This and the next two sentences begin respectively with ime, ito, idha.

[13] citta.

[14] I think the reading here should be yaɱ cittaɱ (instead of sacittaɱ) as in the paragraph below on the skilled moral habits.

[15] kuhiɱ. MA, iii. 269 says katamaɱ ṭhānaɱ pāpuṇitvā, having achieved which stage? - the stage of stream-attainment, or which? The answer is Immediately given, and its conclusion: 'It is here ...' means, according to MA. iii. 269, in the fruit of stream-attainment.

[16] As at M. ii. II.

[17] sīlavā hoti no ca sīlamayo. VvA. 10 adduces six meanings of the word maya, and as an example of the sixth gives dānamaya, sīlamaya, in the sense of adding a syllable for the sake of completeness. But MA. iii. 270 says no ca sīlamayo means that, being possessed of moral habit, there is nothing further than this to be done.

[18] yattha: in the fruit of arahantship, MA. iii. 270.

 


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