Aŋguttara Nikāya


 

Aŋguttara-Nikāya
III. Tika Nipāta
III. Puggala Vagga

The Numerical Discourses of the Buddha
III. The Book of the Threes
III. Persons

Sutta 27

Jigucchitabba Suttaɱ

Disgust

Translated from the Pali by Bhikkhu Bodhi.

© 2012 Bhikkhu Bodhi
Published by
Wisdom Publications
Boston, MA 02115

This work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivs 3.0 Unported License
Based on a work at http://www.wisdompubs.org/book/numerical-discourses-buddha
Permissions beyond the scope of this license may be available at http://www.wisdompubs.org/terms-use.

 


 

[1][pts] "Bhikkhus, there are these three kinds of persons found existing in the world.

What three?

(1) There is a person who is to be looked upon with disgust, not to be associated with, followed, and served;

(2) a person who is to be looked upon with equanimity, not to be associated with, followed, and served; and

(3) a person who is to be associated with, followed, and served.

(1) "And what kind of person, bhikkhus, is to be looked upon with disgust, not to be associated with, followed, and served?

Here, some person is immoral, of bad character, impure, of suspect behavior, secretive in his actions, not an ascetic though claiming to be one, not a celibate though claiming to be one, inwardly rotten, corrupt, depraved.

Such a person is to be looked upon with disgust, not to be associated with, followed, and served.

For what reason?

Even though one does not follow the example of such a person, a bad report still circulates about oneself:

'He has bad friends, bad companions, bad comrades.'

Just as a snake that has passed through feces, though it does not bite one, would smear one, so too, though one does not follow the example of such a person, a bad report still circulates about oneself:

'He has bad friends, bad companions, bad comrades.'

Therefore such a person is to be looked upon with disgust, not to be associated with, followed, and served.

(2) "And what kind of person is to be looked upon with equanimity, not to be associated with, followed, and served?

Here, some person is prone to anger and easily exasperated.

Even if he is criticized slightly he loses his temper and becomes irritated, hostile, and stubborn; he displays irritation, hatred, and bitterness.

Just as a festering sore, if struck by a stick or a shard, will discharge even more matter, so too...

Just as a firebrand of the/ tinduka/ tree, if struck by a stick or shard, will sizzle and crackle even more, so too...

Just as a pit of feces, if struck by a stick or a shard, becomes even more foul-smelling, so too some person here is prone to anger and... displays irritation, hatred, and bitterness.

Such a person is to be looked upon with equanimity, not to be associated with, followed, and served.

For what reason?

[With the thought:]

'He might insult me, revile me, and do me harm.'

Therefore such a person is to be looked upon with equanimity, not to be associated with, followed, and served.

(3) "And what kind of person is to be associated with, followed, and served?

Here, some person is virtuous and of good character.

Such a person is to be associated with, followed, and served.

For what reason?

Even though one does not follow the example of such a person, a good report still circulates about oneself:

'He has good friends, good companions, good comrades.'

Therefore such a person is to be associated with, followed, and served.

"These, bhikkhus, are the three kinds of persons found existing in the world."

One who associates with an inferior person declines;
one who associates with an equal does not decline;
attending on a superior person one develops quickly;
therefore you should follow one superior to yourself.


Contact:
E-mail
Copyright Statement