Aŋguttara Nikāya


[Home]  [Sutta Indexes]  [Glossology]  [Site Sub-Sections]


 

Aŋguttara-Nikāya
III. Tika Nipāta
III. Puggala Vagga

The Book of the Gradual Sayings
or
More-Numbered Suttas

III. The Book of the Threes
III. On Persons

Sutta 27

Sevitabba Suttaɱ

Loathsome[1]

Translated from the Pali by
F.L. Woodward, M.A.

Copyright The Pali Text Society
Commercial Rights Reserved
Creative Commons Licence
For details see Terms of Use.

 


[108]

[1][bodh] Thus have I heard:

On a certain occasion the Exalted One was staying near Sāvatthī at Jeta Grove,
in Anāthapiṇḍika's Park.

Then the Exalted One addressed the monks, saying:

"Monks."

"Yes, Lord," replied those monks to the Exalted One.

The Exalted One said this:

"Monks, these three persons
are found existing in the world.

What three?

There is a person who is to be shunned as loathsome,
not to [109] be followed,
served
and honoured.

There is a person who is to be regarded with indifference,[2]
not to be followed,
served
and honoured.

There is a person who is to be followed,
served
and honoured.

 

§

 

Of what sort, monks, is the one
who is to be shunned?

In this case a certain person is immoral,
an evil-doer,
impure,
of suspicious behaviour,
of covert deeds.

He is no recluse,
though he pretends to be one:
he is no liver of the righteous life,
though he pretends to be:
rotten within
and full of lusts,
a rubbish-heap of filth is he.[3]

Such an one, monks,
is to be shunned as loathsome,
not to be followed,
served
and honoured.

Why so?

Because, even though one do not profess adherence
to the views of such a man,
nevertheless an ill report
spreads abroad about one,
that he is a man who associates with evil-doers,
a man who has bad friends,
one who consorts with the wicked.

Now, monks, suppose a snake
goes into a dunghill.

Though he does not bite[4]
(the one who takes him out),
yet he befouls him.

Just so, monks,
though one do not profess adherence
to the views of such a man,
nevertheless an ill report
spreads abroad about one,
that he is a man who associates with evil-doers,
a man who has bad friends,
one who consorts with the wicked.

Wherefore, monks,
such an one is to be shunned as loathsome,
not to be followed,
served
and honoured.

And of what sort, monks,
is the person who is to be treated with indifference?

In this case a certain person
is irritable and turbulent.[5]

When anything,
however trifling,
is said to him
he becomes enraged,
gets angry and quarrelsome:
he resents it,
and displays anger,
hatred
and sulkiness.

Just as when a festering sore,
if struck by a stick or sherd,
discharges matter all the more,
even so a certain person
is irritable and turbulent.

When anything,
however trifling,
is said to him
he becomes enraged,
gets angry and quarrelsome:
he resents it,
and displays anger,
hatred
and sulkiness.

Just as a firebrand of tinduka[6] wood,
if struck [110] by a stick or sherd,
fizzles and sputters all the more,
even so a certain person
is irritable and turbulent.

When anything,
however trifling,
is said to him
he becomes enraged,
gets angry and quarrelsome:
he resents it,
and displays anger,
hatred
and sulkiness.

Just as a cesspit
stirred with a stick or sherd
gives out a stench
more noisome than before,
even so a certain person
is irritable and turbulent.

When anything,
however trifling,
is said to him
he becomes enraged,
gets angry and quarrelsome:
he resents it,
and displays anger,
hatred
and sulkiness.

Such a person, monks,
is to be regarded with indifierence
not to be followed,
served
and honoured.

Why so?

Because one thinks:

"He might curse me."

"He might abuse me."

"He might do me some injury."

Wherefore, monks,
such a person is to be treated with indifierence,
he is not to be followed,
served
and honoured.

And of what sort, monks,
is the person who is to be followed,
served
and honoured?

In this case
a certain person is virtuous,
of a lovely nature.

Such an one should be followed,
served
and honoured.

Why so?

Because, although one may not profess[7] adherence to his views,
yet a fair report spreads abroad
that one is a man who associates with the lovely,
a man who has worthy friends,
a man who consorts with the worthy.

Wherefore such an one is to be followed,
served
and honoured.

These, monks, are the three persons
found existing in the world.

 


 

Who follows mean companions soon decays:
He never fails who with his equals mates:
Who leans towards the noble rises soon.
Then do thou serve a better than thyself.'

 


[1] Cf. Pugg., p. 36.

[2] Ajjhupekkhitabbo. Cf. S. v, 440.

[3] Supra, text 108; K.S. iv, 114.

[4] Text should read ḍasati for ḍassati. Comy. takes the snake to be dhammanī ahi ('rat snake' acc. to Childers). The dunghill is immorality.

[5] Supra, text 124.

[6] Dictionaries call this Diospyros embryopieris.

[7] I read na for pana of text.


Contact:
E-mail
Copyright Statement