Aŋguttara Nikāya


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Aŋguttara-Nikāya
III. Tika Nipāta
III. Puggala Vagga

The Book of Threes
III. People

Sutta 23

Sankhāra Suttaɱ

Made One's Own

Translated from the Pali
by
Michael M. Olds

 


 

[23][pts][bodh][upal] I hear tell:

Once upon a time the Sammā-saɱ-Buddha, Sāvatthī-town residing,
Anāthapiṇḍika's Jeta Grove.

There, to the beggars gathered round he said:

"There are these three sorts of persons to be seen in the world.

What three?

Here beggars, a person
conjures up an identified-with[1] body associated with the injurious;
conjures up identified-with speech associated with the injurious;
conjures up an identified-with mind associated with the injurious.

He, having conjured up an identified-with body associated with the injurious,
having conjured up identified-with speech associated with the injurious;
having conjured up an identified-with mind associated with the injurious,
rises up in a world associated with the injurious.

He, having risen up in a world associated with the injurious,
is subsequently contacted by injurious contacts.

He, contacted by injurious contacts,
experiences extremely[2] painful injurious sensations
such as do the beings in Niraya.

Then, again, beggars, a person
conjures up an identified-with body dis-associated from the injurious;
conjures up identified-with speech dis-associated from the injurious;
conjures up an identified-with mind dis-associated from the injurious.

He, having conjured up an identified-with body dis-associated from the injurious,
having conjured up identified-with speech dis-associated from the injurious;
having conjured up an identified-with mind dis-associated from the injurious,
rises up in a world dis-associated from the injurious.

He, having risen up in a world dis-associated from the injurious,
is subsequently contacted by non-injurious contacts.

He, contacted by non-injurious contacts,
experiences extremely pleasant non-injurious sensations
such as do the Subhakiṇṇā gods.

Then, again, beggars, a person
conjures up an identified-with body both associated with and dis-associated from the injurious;
conjures up identified-with speech both associated with and dis-associated from the injurious;
conjures up an identified-with mind both associated with and dis-associated from the injurious.

He, having conjured up an identified-with body both associated with and dis-associated from the injurious,
having conjured up identified-with speech both associated with and dis-associated from the injurious;
having conjured up an identified-with mind both associated with and dis-associated from the injurious,
rises up in a world both associated with and dis-associated from the injurious.

He, having risen up in a world both associated with and dis-associated from the injurious,
is subsequently contacted by both injurious and non-injurious contacts.

He, contacted by both injurious and non-injurious contacts,
experiences mixed-up pleasant and painful sensations
such as do humans,
some gods,
and some in the lower realms.

"These, beggars, are these three sorts of persons to be seen in the world.

 


[1] Sankhāraɱ. Own-made; made one's own, of one's own making. Sankharaming is the act of creating identified-with experience through identification with the intent associated with acts of body, speech and mind.

[2] Ekanta. One-ended. Extreme.

 


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