Aŋguttara Nikāya


[Home]  [Sutta Indexes]  [Glossology]  [Site Sub-Sections]


 

Aŋguttara Nikāya
Pañcaka Nipāta
I: Sekha-Bala Vagga

The Book of the Gradual Sayings
The Book of the Fives
I: The Learner's Powers

Sutta 3

Dukkha Suttaɱ

Ill

Translated by E. M. Hare

Copyright The Pali Text Society
Commercial Rights Reserved
Creative Commons Licence
For details see Terms of Use.

 


[3] [2]

Ill

[1][olds][bodh] 'Monks, possessing five qualities
a monk, in this very world,
lives ill at ease,
vexed,
troubled,
pained;
on the breaking up of the body, after death,
an ill-faring may be expected[1] for him.

What five?

[3] Monks, herein a monk is without faith,
unconscientious,
has no fear of blame,
is indolent and
lacking in insight.

Monks, possessing these five qualities
a monk, in this very world,
lives ill at ease,
vexed,
troubled,
pained;
on the breaking up of the body, after death,
an ill-faring may be expected for him.

 

§

 

Monks, possessing five qualities
a monk lives wholly at ease in this world,
free of vexation,
trouble and
pain;
on the breaking up of the body, after death,
a well-faring may be expected for him.

What five?'

Monks, herein a monk has faith,
conscientiousness,
fear of blame,
energy and
insight.

Monks, possessing these five qualities
a monk lives wholly at ease in this world,
free of vexation,
trouble and
pain;
on the breaking up of the body, after death,
a well-faring may be expected for him.

 


[1] Cf. It. 22f.; S. iii, 8; A. i, 202, below VI, § 75.


Contact:
E-mail
Copyright Statement