Aŋguttara Nikāya


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Aŋguttara Nikāya
X. Dasaka-Nipāta
II. Nātha Vagga

The Book of the Gradual Sayings
X. The Book of the Tens
II: Things Making for Warding[1]

Sutta 11

Sen'āsana Suttaɱ

Lodging

Translated from the Pali by F. L. Woodward, M.A.

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[15] [10]

[1][bodh] Thus have I heard:

On a certain occasion the Exalted One was staying near Sāvatthī.

There the Exalted One addressed the monks, saying:

"Monks."

"Yes, lord," they replied, and the Exalted One said:

"Complete in five factors, monks,
a monk who follows after and resorts to
the lodging-place[2] which is complete in five factors
in no long time,
by destroying the cankers,
realizes in this same visible existence
the heart's release,
the release by insight,
thoroughly comprehending it of himself,
and having attained it
abides therein.

 

§

 

How is a monk complete in five factors?

Herein a monk is a believer;
he believes:

'He that Exalted [11] One, Arahant,
is a perfectly Enlightened One,
perfect in knowledge and practice,
a Welfarer,
a world-knower,
trainer unsurpassed of men to be trained,
teacher of devas and mankind,
Awakened One,
Exalted One.'

Moreover he is little troubled by sickness and disease;

he is furnished with digestive power[3]
not too hot or too cold,
but even
and suitable for striving;[4]

he is honest,
no deceiver,
he is one who shows himself as he really is
to the Teacher,
to his discerning co-mates in the brahma-life;

he dwells resolute in energy,
ever striving to abandon bad qualities,
stout and strong to acquire good qualities,
not shirking the burden in good qualities;[5]

he is a man of insight,
possessed of insight
for tracing the rise and fall of things,
insight that is Ariyan,
penetrating,
going on to the utter destruction of ill.[6]

In this way, monks,
a monk is complete in five factors.

 

§

 

And how is one's lodging-place complete in five factors?

Herein, monks, a lodging-place
is not too far
and not too near (a village),
but suitable for coming and going,
by day not frequented,
by night quiet and undisturbed by noise,
not plagued with contact of flies,
mosquitoes,
wind,
rain
and creeping things.

Moreover, for one dwelling in such a lodging-place
the supply of robes and alms-food,
of bed and lodging,
comforts in sickness
and medicaments
comes about with little trouble;

further in that lodging-place
dwell elder monks who have heard much,
who are versed in the sayings,
who know the teachings thoroughly,
[16] who know the discipline and summaries by heart.[7]

Consorting with them from time to time
he inquires of them
and questions them [12] thus:

'How is this, your reverence?

What is the meaning of this?'

Those worthies then open up to him
what was sealed,
make clear what was obscure,
and on divers doubtful points of doctrine
they resolve his doubts.

That, monks, is how one's lodging-place is complete in five factors.

 

§

 

Indeed, monks, complete in five factors,
a monk who follows after
and resorts to the lodging-plaee
complete also in five factors
in no long time,
by destroying the cankers,
realizes in this same visible existence
the heart's release,
the release by insight,
thoroughly comprehending it of himself,
and having attained it abides therein."

 


[1] Nātha at § 17; cf. the name Anātha-piṇḍika, 'feeder of the helpless.'

[2] Cf. G.S. i, 220.

[3] Sama-vepākiṇiyā gahaŋiyā; cf. D. ii, 177; iii, 166 = Dialog. ii, 208 and n.; iii, 157 (in Marks of the Superman); A. iii, 65 = G.S. iii, 54. Our Comy. has nothing to say about this gahaṇī or inner process or organ. According to DA. ii, 628, it is kammaja-tejo-dhātu (digestive heat). See note to Dialog. ii, 208.

[4] Majjhimāya padhāna-kkhamāya. So Mr. Hare at G.S. iii, 54. At Dialog, iii, 157, the quality is ascribed to the person himself (patience in exertion), but obviously it refers to the digestion.

[5] Cf. K.S. v, 173 (The Controlling Power of Energy).

[6] Cf. K.S. v, 175 (The Controlling Power of Insight).

[7] Āgatāgamā; cf. G.S. i, 101; iii, 257.


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