Aŋguttara Nikāya


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Aŋguttara Nikāya
X. Dasaka-Nipāta
II. Nātha Vagga

The Book of the Gradual Sayings
X. The Book of the Tens
II: Things Making for Warding

Sutta 12

Pañc'Aŋga Suttaɱ

Factors

Translated from the Pali by F. L. Woodward, M.A.

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[16] [12]

[1][bodh] Thus have I heard:

On a certain occasion the Exalted One was staying near Sāvatthī.

There the Exalted One addressed the monks, saying:

"Monks."

"Yes, lord," they replied, and the Exalted One said:

"Monks, a monk who has given up five factors
and is complete in five factors
is called in this Dhamma-discipline:

'All proficient,[1]
one who has lived the life,
the best of men.'

 

§

 

And how is a monk one who has given up five factors?

Herein a monk's sensual desire is given up,
malevolence,
sloth-and-torpor,
worry-and-flurry,
doubt-and-wavering are given up.

Thus is he one who has given up five factors.

 

§

 

And how is he complete in five factors?

Herein a monk is complete
in the sum total of a master's virtues,
of a master's concentration,[2]
in the sum total of a master's insight,
release,
the release by knowing and seeing.

Thus is he complete in five factors.

 

§

 

Monks, a monk who has given up five
and is complete in five factors
is called in this Dhamma-discipline:

'All-proficient,
one who has lived the life,
the best of men.'

 


 

Not sensual desire, malevolence,
Nor sloth-and-torpor, worry-and-flurry at all,
Not doubt-and-wavering in a monk are seen.
[17] [13] Blest with a master's virtues, concentration,
Release and knowledge which belong to it, -
He surely, with five factors all complete,
Abandoning five factors, is thus called
"One all-proficient in this Dhamma-discipline."[3]

 


[1] Kevalī; cf. Itiv. § 97, 'One lovely in virtue, nature and insight' (an 'all-rounder') is so called. Comy. kemlehi guṇehi samannāgato; cf. V.M. i, 146: KhA.. 115 (on kevala-kappa) = SA. i, 15, which quotes our passage, reading kevalaɱ. The word is also used for nibbāna.; in Sankhya and Yoga works it means the complete absorption in the thought of the universal unity (kaivalya), or the complete isolation of the purusha after death of the body.

[2] Samādhi-k-khandha; cf. G.S. ii, 51.

[3] Partly at Thag. v. 74 and v. 1010; Thig. v. 165.


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