Aŋguttara Nikāya


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Aŋguttara Nikāya
X. Dasaka-Nipāta
II. Nātha Vagga

The Book of the Gradual Sayings
X. The Book of the Tens
II: Things Making for Warding

Sutta 20

Dutiya Ariya-Vāsa Suttaɱ

Ariyan Living (b)

Translated from the Pali by F. L. Woodward, M.A.

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[29] [21]

[1][than][bodh] Thus have I heard:

Once the Exalted One was staying among the Kurus at Kammasadhamma,[1] a township of the Kurus.

On that occasion the Exalted One addressed the monks, saying:

"Monks, there are these ten ways of Ariyan living,
according to which Ariyans have lived,
do live
and shall live.

What ten?

Herein a monk has abandoned five factors,
is possessed of six factors,
guards one factor,
observes the four bases,
has shaken off individual belief,
has utterly given up longings,
his thoughts are unclouded,
his body-complex is tranquillized,
he is well released in heart,
he is well released by insight.

These are the ten ways of Ariyan living,
according to which Ariyans have lived,
do live
and shall live.'

 

§

 

And how is a monk one who has abandoned five factors?

Herein a monk has abandoned sensual desires,
malevolence,
sloth-and-torpor,
worry-and-flurry,
doubt-and-wavering.

Thus he is one who has abandoned five factors.

And how is a monk one who is possessed of six factors?

Herein a monk, seeing an object with the eye,
is not elated or depressed,
but lives indifferent,
mindful
and composed.

-◦-

Hearing a sound with the ear,
is not elated or depressed,
but lives indifferent,
mindful
and composed.

-◦-

Smelling a scent with the [22] nose,
is not elated or depressed,
but lives indifferent,
mindful
and composed.

-◦-

Tasting a savour with the tongue,
is not elated or depressed,
but lives indifferent,
mindful
and composed.

-◦-

Contacting an object with the body,
is not elated or depressed,
but lives indifferent,
mindful
and composed.

-◦-

With mind cognizing mental states,
is not elated or depressed,
but lives indifferent,
mindful
and composed.

Thus is a monk possessed of six factors.

And how does a monk guard one factor?

By guarding mindfulness
he is composed in mind.

Thus he guards one factor.

 

§

 

And how does a monk observe the four bases?

Bhk. Bodhi's translation is much clearer:
"...four supports? Here, having reflected, a bhikkhu uses some things, patiently endures other things, avoids still other things, and dispels still other things." It is a generic instruction. For details see: MN 2

p.p. explains it all — p.p.

Herein a monk deliberately[2] follows one thing,
deliberately endures another thing;
avoids one thing,
suppresses another thing.

Thus a monk observes the four bases.

 

§

 

And how is a monk one who has shaken off individual beliefs?

Herein, monks, whatsoever individual beliefs generally prevail among the generality of recluses and brahmins,
to wit:

The world is eternal;
the world is not;
the world is finite;
it is not;
what life is,
that is body: or,
life is one thing,
body another; or,
a wayfarer exists beyond death, or,
a wayfarer exists not beyond death; or,
he both exists and yet exists not; or
he neither exists nor exists not beyond death -
all these beliefs are shaken off,
put away,
given up,
let go,
abandoned
and dismissed.

Thus is a monk one who has shaken off individual beliefs.

 

§

 

And how is a monk one who has utterly given up longings?[3]

Herein in a monk longing for things sensual is abandoned,
longing for becoming is abandoned,
longing for the brahma-life has calmed down.

Thus is a monk one who has utterly given up longings.

 

§

 

And how are a monk's thoughts unclouded?

Herein a monk has abandoned thoughts sensual,
thoughts malicious,
thoughts of harming.

Thus are his thoughts unclouded.

 

§

 

And how is a monk's body-complex tranquillized?

Herein a monk, by abandoning pleasure and pain,
by coming [23] to an end of the ease and discomfort which he had before,
attains and abides in a state of neither pain nor pleasure,
an equanimity of utter purity
which is the fourth musing.

Thus his body-complex is tranquillized.

 

§

 

And how is a monk well released in heart?

Herein a monk's heart is released from passion,
hate
and delusion.

Thus is a monk well released in heart.

 

§

 

And how is a monk well released by insight?

Herein a monk knows for certain:

Passion is abandoned in me,
cut off at the root,
made like a palm-tree stump,
made not to become again,
of a nature not to arise again in future time.

Hatred,
cut off at the root,
made like a palm-tree stump,
made not to become again,
of a nature not to arise again in future time.

Delusion is abandoned in me,
cut off at the root,
made like a palm-tree stump,
made not to become again,
of a nature not to arise again in future time.

Thus is a monk well released by insight.

 

§

 

Monks, whatsoever Ariyans have in past time
lived according to the Ariyan living,
all of them lived according to these ten ways of Ariyan living.

Whatsoever Ariyans shall in future time so
live according to the Ariyan living,
all of them shall live according to these ten ways of Ariyan living.

Whatsoever Ariyans do now so
live according to the Ariyan living,
all of them do live according to these ten ways of Ariyan living.

These, monks, are the ten ways of Ariyan living,
according to which Ariyans have lived,
do live
and shall live.

 


[1] Cf. D. ii, 55; M. i, 532;[ed1] Rhys Davids' Buddhist India, p. 27. Comy. = DA. iii, 1051.

[2] Sankhāya, gerund; cf. G.S. ii, 143. [Ed.: ? AN 4.157? Here eka is indefinite.

[3] Samavaya-saṭṭhesano = samā-vissaṭṭha-sabba-esano, Comy.; cf. G.S. ii, 48 n.

 


[ed1] This points to a section at the end of the text of MN Volume 1 which provides discussions of various readings. In this case of the spelling of 'Kammasadhamma'.


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