Majjhima Nikaya


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Majjhima Nikāya
II. Majjhima-Paṇṇāsa
4. Rāja Vagga

The Middle Length Sayings
II. The Middle Fifty Discourses
4. The Royal Division

Sutta 85

Bodhi-Rāja-Kumāra Suttaɱ

Discouse to Prince Bodhi

Translated from the Pali by I.B. Horner, M.A.
Associate of Newham College, Cambridge
First Published in 1954

Copyright The Pali Text Society
Commercial Rights Reserved
Creative Commons Licence
For details see Terms of Use.

 


 

[1][chlm][upal] THUS have I heard:

At one time the Lord was staying among the Bhaggas
in Suṁsumāragira
in Bhesakaḷā Grove
in the deer-park.

At that time Prince Bodhi had a palace named Kokanada;[1]
it had not long been built
and had had not (yet) been inhabited
by a recluse
or brahman
or by any human being.

Then Prince Bodhi addressed the brahman youth Sañjikā's son,
saying:

"Come you, good Sañjikā's son,
approach the Lord;
having approached,
in my name salute the Lord's feet with your head,
and ask whether he is well,
not indisposed,
of bodily vigour,
strong,
abiding in comfort,
and say:

'Lord, Prince Bodhi salutes the Lord's feet with his head
and asks whether he is well,
not indisposed,
of bodily vigour,
strong,
abiding in comfort.'

And speak thus to him:

'Revered sir, may the Lord,
together with the Order of monks,
consent to (accept) a meal on the morrow
with Prince Bodhi.'"

"Yes, sir,"
and the brahman youth Sañjikā's son,
having answered Prince Bodhi in assent,
approached the Lord;
having approached,
he exchanged greetings with the Lord,
and having conversed in a friendly and courteous way,
he sat down at a respectful distance.

As he was sitting down at a respectful distance,
the brahman youth Sañjikā's son
spoke thus to the Lord:

"Good Gotama,
Prince Bodhi salutes with his head
the good Gotama's feet
and asks whether he is well,
not indisposed,
of bodily vigour,
strong,
abiding in comfort.

And he speaks thus:

'May the revered Gotama,
together with the Order of monks,
consent to (accept) a meal on the morrow
with Prince Bodhi.'"

The Lord consented by becoming silent.

Then the brahman youth Sañjikā's son,
having understood the Lord's consent,
rising from his seat
approached Prince Bodhi;
having approached,
he spoke thus to Prince Bodhi:

"I spoke in your name, good sir,
to the Lord Gotama,
saying:

"Good Gotama,
Prince Bodhi salutes with his head
the good Gotama's feet
and asks whether he is well,
not indisposed,
of bodily vigour,
strong,
abiding in comfort.

And he speaks thus:

'May the revered Gotama,
together with the Order of monks,
consent to (accept) a meal on the morrow
with [280] Prince Bodhi.'"

And the recluse Gotama consented."

Then, after Prince Bodhi had had sumptuous foods,
solid and soft,
prepared in his own dwelling
towards the end of that night,
and had had the Kokanada palace
spread with white cloths
as far as the last[2] flight of stairs,
he addressed the brahman youth Sanjikā's son,
saying:

"Come you, good Sañjikā's son,
approach the Lord;
having approached,
announce the time to the Lord,
saying:

'It is time, revered sir,
the meal is ready.'"

"Yes, good sir,"
and the brahman youth Sañjikā's son,
having answered Prince Bodhi in assent,
approached the Lord;
having approached,
he announced the time to the Lord,
saying:

"It is time, revered sir,
the meal is ready."

Then the Lord, dressing in the morning
and taking his bowl and robe,
approached Prince Bodhi's dwelling.

At that time Prince Bodhi,
while he was waiting for the Lord,
was standing at the porch
of the outside gateway.

And Prince Bodhi saw the Lord coming in the distance;
having seen him
and gone to meet him,
he greeted and honoured the Lord
and approached the Kokanada palace.

Then the Lord stood
leaning against the last flight of stairs.

And Prince Bodhi spoke thus to the Lord:

"Revered sir, let the Lord step on the cloths,
let the Well-farer step on the cloths
so that for a long time
it may be for my welfare and happiness."

When this had been said,
the Lord was silent.

And a second time Prince Bodhi spoke thus to the Lord:

"Revered sir, let the Lord step on the cloths,
let the Well-farer step on the cloths
so that for a long time
it may be for my welfare and happiness."

When this had been said,
the Lord was silent.

And a third time Prince Bodhi spoke thus to the Lord:

"Revered sir, let the Lord step on the cloths,
let the Well-farer step on the cloths
so that for a long time
it may be for my welfare and happiness."

Then the Lord looked towards the venerable Ānanda.

And the venerable Ānanda spoke thus to Prince Bodhi:

"Prince, have the cloths packed away.

The Lord will not tread upon a cloth carpeting;
the Tathāgata looks towards[3] the folk that come after."

Then Prince Bodhi had the cloths packed away,
and had a seat made ready
upstairs in the Kokanada palace.

Then the Lord
having ascended the Kokanada palace,
sat down on the seat made ready
together with the Order of monks.

Then Prince Bodhi
with his own hand
served and satisfied the Order of monks
with the Lord at its head
with sumptuous foods,
solid and soft.

Then when the Lord had eaten
and had withdrawn his hand from his bowl,
Prince Bodhi, having taken a lower seat,
sat down at a respectful distance.

[281] As he was sitting down at a respectful distance,
Prince Bodhi Spoke thus to the Lord:

"Lord, it has occurred to me thus:

Happiness is not to be achieved through happiness;
happiness is to be achieved through suffering."[4]

"To me too, Prince,
before my Awakening,
while I was still the bodhisatta,
not fully awakened,
it occurred:

Happiness is not to be achieved through happiness;
happiness is to be achieved through suffering."

Then I, Prince, after a time, being young, my hair coal-black,
possessed of radiant youth,
in the prime of my life —
although my unwilling parents wept and wailed —
having cut off my hair and beard,
having put on yellow robes,
went forth from home
into homelessness.

I, being gone forth thus,
a quester for whatever is good,
searching for the incomparable,
matchless path to peace,
approached Āḷāra the Kālāma;
having approached,
I spoke thus to Āḷāra the Kālāma:

'I, reverend Kālāma, want to fare the Brahmā-faring
in this dhamma and discipline.'

This said, Prince, Āḷāra the Kālāma spoke thus to me:

'Let the venerable one proceed;
this dhamma is such that an intelligent man,
having soon realised super-knowledge for himself
(as learnt from) his own teacher,
may enter on and abide in it.'

So I, Prince, very soon,
very quickly,
mastered that dhamma.

I, Prince, as far as mere lip service,
mere repetition
were concerned,
spoke the doctrine of knowledge,
and the doctrine of the elders,
and I claimed —
I as well as others —
that 'I know, I see.'

Then it occurred to me, Prince:

'But Āḷāra the Kālāma does not merely proclaim this dhamma
simply out of faith:
Having realised super-knowledge for myself,
entering on it,
I am abiding therein.

For surely Āḷāra the Kālāma proceeds knowing, seeing this dhamma.'

Then did I, Prince,
approach Āḷāra the Kālāma;
having approached,
I spoke thus to Āḷāra the Kālāma:

'To what extent do you, reverend Kālāma,
having realised super-knowledge for yourself,
entering thereon,
proclaim this dhamma?'

When this had been said, Prince, Āḷāra the Kālāma proclaimed the plane of no-thing.

Then it occurred to me, Prince:

'It is not only Āḷāra the Kālāma who has faith,
I too have faith.

It is not only Āḷāra the Kālāma who has energy,
I too have energy.

It is not only Āḷāra the Kālāma who has mindfulness,
I too have mindfulness.

It is not only Āḷāra the Kālāma who has concentration,
I too have concentration.

It is not only Āḷāra the Kālāma who has intuitive wisdom,
I too have intuitive wisdom.

Suppose now that I should strive
for the realisation of that dhamma
which Āḷāra the Kālāma proclaims:
'Having realised super-knowledge for myself,
entering on it
I am abiding therein?'

So I, Prince, very soon,
very quickly,
having realised super-knowledge for myself,
entering on that dhamma,
abided therein.

Then I, Prince,
approached Āḷāra the Kālāma;
having approached,
I spoke thus to Āḷāra the Kālāma:

'Is it to this extent
that you, reverend Kalama,
proclaim this dhamma,
entering on it,
having realised it by your own super-knowledge?'

'It is to this extent
that I, your reverence,
proclaim this dhamma,
entering on it,
having realised it by my own super-knowledge.'

'I too, your reverence,
having realised this dhamma
by my own super-knowledge,
entering on it
am abiding in it.'

'It is profitable for us,
it is well gotten for us, your reverence,
that we see a fellow Brahmā-farer
such as the venerable one.

This dhamma that I, entering on,
proclaim,
having realised it by my own super-knowledge,
is the dhamma that you,
entering on,
are abiding in,
having realised it by your own super-knowledge;
the dhamma that you,
entering on,
are abiding in,
having realised it by your own super-knowledge,
is the dhamma that I,
entering on,
proclaim,
having realised it by my own super-knowledge.

The dhamma that I know,
this is the dhamma that you know.

The dhamma that you know,
this is the dhamma that I know.

As I am,
so are you;
as you are,
so am I.

Come now, your reverence,
being just the two of us,
let us look after this group.'

In this way, Prince,
did Āḷāra the Kālāma,
being my teacher,
set me — the pupil —
on the same level as himself
and honoured me with the highest honour.

Then it occurred to me, Prince:

'This dhamma does not conduce to disregard
nor to dispassion
nor to stopping
nor to tranquillity
nor to super-knowledge
nor to awakening
nor to Nibbāna,
but only as far as reaching the plane of no-thing.'

So I, Prince,
not getting enough from this dhamma,
disregarded and turned away from this dhamma.

 


 

Then I, Prince,
a quester for whatever is good,
searching for the incomparable,
matchless path to peace,
approached Uddaka, Rāma's son;
having approached,
I spoke thus to Uddaka, Rāma's son:

'I, your reverence,
want to fare the Brahmā-faring
in this dhamma and discipline.'

This said, Prince, Uddaka, Rāma's son,
spoke thus to me:

'Let the venerable one proceed;
this dhamma is such
that an intelligent man,
having soon realised super-knowledge for himself,
(as learnt from) his own teacher,
may enter on and abide in it.'

So I, Prince, very soon,
very quickly,
mastered that dhamma.

I, Prince, as far as mere lip service,
mere repetition were concerned,
spoke the doctrine of knowledge
and the doctrine of the elders,
and I claimed —
I as well as others —
that 'I know, I see.'

Then it occurred to me, Prince:

'But Uddahka, Rāma's son, does not merely proclaim this dhamma
simply out of faith:
Having realised super-knowledge for myself,
entering on it,
I am abiding in it.

For surely Uddaka, Rāma's son,
proceeds knowing and seeing this dhamma.'

Then did I, Prince,
approach Uddaka, Rāma's;
having approached,
I spoke thus to Uddaka, Rāma's son:

'To what extent do you, reverend Rāma,
having realised super-knowledge for yourself,
entering thereon
proclaim this dhamma?'

When this had been said, Prince, Uddahka, Rāma's son,
proclaimed the plane of neither-perception-nor-non-perception.

Then it occurred to me, Prince:

'It is not only Rāma who has faith,
I too have faith.

It is not only Rāma who has energy,
I too have energy.

It is not only Rāma who has mindfulness,
I too have mindfulness.

It is not only Rāma who has concentration,
I too have concentration.

It is not only Rāma who has intuitive wisdom,
I too have intuitive wisdom.

Suppose now that I should strive for the realisation of that dhamma
which Rāma proclaims:
'Having realised super-knowledge for myself,
entering on it
I am abiding in it?'

So I, Prince, very soon,
very quickly,
having realised super-knowledge for myself,
entering on that dhamma,
abided therein.

Then I, Prince,
approached Uddaka, Rāma's son;
having approached,
I spoke thus to Uddaka, Rāma's son:

'Is it to this extent
that you, reverend Rāma,
proclaim this dhamma,
entering on it,
having realised it by your own super-knowledge?'

'It is to this extent
that I, your reverence,
proclaim this dhamma,
entering on it,
having realised it by my own super-knowledge.'

'I too, your reverence,
having realised this dhamma by my own super-knowledge,
entering on it
am abiding in it.'

'It is profitable for us,
it is well gotten by us,
your reverence,
that we see a fellow-Brahmā-farer such as the venerable one.

This dhamma that I,
entering on,
proclaim,
having realised it by my own super-knowledge,
is the dhamma that you,
entering on,
are abiding in,
having realised it by your own super-knowledge;
the dhamma that you,
entering on,
are abiding in,
having realised it by your own super-knowledge,
is the dhamma that I,
entering on,
proclaim,
having realised it by my own super-knowledge.

The dhamma that I know,
this is the dhamma that you know.

That dhamma that you know,
this is the dhamma that I know.

As I am,
so are you;
as you are,
so am I.

Come now, your reverence,
being just the two of us,
let us look after this group.

In this way, Prince, did Uddaka, Rāma's son,
being my teacher,
set me — the pupil —
on the same level as himself
and honoured me with the highest honour.

Then it occurred to me, Prince:

'This dhamma does not conduce to disregard
nor to dispassion
nor to stopping
nor to tranquillity
nor to super-knowledge
nor to awakening
nor to Nibbāna,
but only as far as reaching the plane of neither-perception-nor-non-perception.'

So I, Prince, not getting enough from this dhamma,
disregarded and turned away from this dhamma.

 


 

Then I, monka, a quester for whatever is good,
searching for the incomparable,
matchless path to peace,
walking on tour through Magadha
in due course arrived at Uruvela,
the camp township.

There I saw a delightful stretch of land
and a lovely woodland grove,
and a clear flowing river
with a delightful ford,
and a village for support nearby.

It occurred to me, Prince:

'Indeed it it is a delightful stretch of land,
and the woodland grove is lovely,
and the river flows clear
with a delightful ford,
and there is a village for support nearby.

Indeed this does well
for the striving
of a young man set on striving.'

Moreover, Prince,
three similes occurred to me spontaneously,
never heard before:

It is as if there were a wet sappy stick placed in water;
then a man might come along
bringing an upper piece of fire-stick,
and thinking:

'I will hght a fire,
I will get heat.'

What do you think about this, Prince?

Could that man, bringing an upper piece of fire-stick,
and rubbing that wet sappy stick
that had been placed in water (with it),
light a fire,
could he get heat?"

"No, good Gotama.

What is the cause of this?

It is, good Gotama,
that such a stick is wet and sappy
and that it was placed in water.

That man would only get fatigue and distress."

"In like manner, Prince,
whatever recluses or brahmans dwell not aloof
from pleasures of the senses that are bodily,
then if that which is for them,
among the sense-pleasures,
desire for sense-pleasure,
affection for sense-pleasure,
infatuation with sense-pleasure,
thirst for sense-pleasure,
fever for sense-pleasure -
if that is not properly got rid of subjectively
nor properly allayed,
whether these worthy recluses and brahmans experience feelings which are acute,
painful,
sharp,
severe,
they could not become those for knowledge,
for vision,
for the incomparable Self-awakening;
and whether these worthy recluses and brahmans do not experience feelings which are acute,
painful,
sharp,
severe,
they could not become those for knowledge,
for vision,
for the incomparable Self-awakening.

This, Prince, was the first parable
that occurred to me spontaneously,
never heard before.

Then, Prince, a second parable
occurred to me spontaneously,
never heard before.

It is as if, Prince, a wet, sappy stick
were placed on dry ground,
far from water.

Then a man might come along
bringing an upper piece of fire-stick,
and thinking:

'I will light a fire,
I will get heat.'

What do you think about this, Prince?

Could that man,
bringing an upper piece of fire-stick,
and rubbing that wet sappy stick
that had been placed on the dry ground,
far from water,
light a fire,
could he get heat?"|| ||

"No, good Gotama.

What is the cause of this?

It is, good Gotama, that that stick is wet and sappy
although it had been placed on dry ground,
far from water.

So that man would only get fatigue and distress."

"In like manner, Prince,
whatever recluses or brahmans dwell not aloof
from pleasures of the senses that are bodily,
then if that which is for them,
among the sense-pleasures,
desire for sense-pleasure,
affection for sense-pleasure,
infatuation with sense-pleasure,
thirst for sense-pleasure,
fever for sense-pleasure -
if that is not properly got rid of subjectively
nor properly allayed,
whether these worthy recluses and brahmans experience feelings which are acute,
painful,
sharp,
severe,
they could not become those for knowledge,
for vision,
for the incomparable Self-awakeningi;
and whether these worthy recluses and brahmans do not experience feelings which are acute,
painful,
sharp,
severe,
they could not become those for knowledge,
for vision,
for the incomparable Self-awakening.

This, Prince, was the second parable
that occurred to me spontaneously,
never heard before.

Then, Prince, a third parable
occurred to me spontaneously,
never heard before.

It is as if, Prince, a dry sapless stick
were placed on the dry ground,
far from water.

Then a man might come along
bringing an upper piece of fire-stick,
and thinking:

'I will light a fire,
I will get heat.'

What do you think about this, Prince?

Could that man, bringing an upper piece of fire-stiek,
and rubbing that dry sapless stick
that had been placed on dry ground,
far from water,
light a fire,
could he get heat?"

"Yes, good Gotama.

What is the cause of this?

It is, good Gotama,
that that stick was dry and sapless
and had been placed on dry ground
far from water."

"In like manner, Prince,
whatever recluses or brahmans dwell aloof
from pleasures of the senses that are bodily,
then if that which is for them,
among the sense-pleasures,
desire for sense-pleasure,
affection for sense-pleasure,
infatuation with sense-pleasure,
thirst for sense-pleasure,
fever for sense-pleasure -
if this is well got rid of subjectively,
well allayed,
then whether these worthy recluses and brahmans experience feelings that are acute,
painful,
sharp,
severe,
indeed they become those for knowledge,
for vision,
for the incomparable Self-awakening;
and whether these worthy recluses and brahmans do not experience feelings that are acute,
painful,
sharp,
severe,
indeed they become those for knowledge,
for vision,
for the incomparable Self-awakening.

This, Prince, was the third parable
that occurred to me spontaneously,
never heard before.

These, Prince, were the three parables
that occurred to me spontaneously,
never heard before.

 


 

It occurred to me, Prince:

'Suppose now that I,
with my teeth clenched,
with my tongue pressed against the palate,
by mind should subdue,
restrain and dominate my mind?'

So I, Prince, with my teeth clenched,
with my tongue pressed against the palate,
by mind subdued,
restrained
and dominated my mind.

While I was subduing,
restraining
and dominating my mind,
with the teeth clenched,
the tongue pressed against the palate,
sweat poured from my armpits.

It is as if, Prince,
a strong man,
having taken hold of a weaker man
by his head or shoulders,
would subdue,
restrain
and dominate him.

Even so, while I, Prince,
was subduing,
restraining
and dominating my mind by mind,
with my teeth clenched,
with my tongue pressed against the palate,
sweat poured from my armpits.

Although, Prince, unsluggish energy came to be stirred up in me,
unmuddled mindfulness set up,
yet my body was turbulent,
not calmed,
because I was harassed in striving
by striving against that very pain.

But yet, Prince,
that painful feeling,
arising in me,
persisted without impinging on my mind.|| ||

It occurred to me, Prince:

'Suppose now that I should meditate
the non-breathing meditation?

So I, Prince,
stopped breathing in and breathing out
through the mouth
and through the nose.

When I, Prince,
had stopped breathing in and breathing out
through the mouth
and through the nose,
there came to be an exceedingly loud noise
of winds escaping by the auditory passages.

As there comes to be an exceedingly loud noise
from the roaring of a smith's bellows,
even so when I, Prince, stopped breathing in and breathing out
through the mouth
and through the nose,
there came to be an exceedingly loud noise
of wind escaping by the auditory passages.

Although, Prince, unsluggish energy came to be stirred up in me,
unmuddled mindfulness set up,
yet my body was turbulent,
not calmed,
because I was harassed in striving
by striving against that very pain.

It was even in this wise, Prince,
that a painful feeling that had arisen in me
persisted without impinging on my mind.

It occurred to me, Prince:

'Suppose now that I should still meditate
the non-breathing meditation?'

So I, Prince, stopped breathing in and breathing out
through the mouth
and through the nose
and through the ears.

When I, Prince, had stopped breathing in and breathing out
through the mouth
and through the nose
and through the ears,
exceedingly loud winds rent my head.

As, Prince, a strong man
might cleave one's head
with a sharp-edged sword,
even so when I, Prince, stopped breathing in and breathing out
through the mouth
and through the nose
and through the ears,
exceedingly loud winds rent my head.

Although, Prince, unsluggish energy came to be stirred up in me,
unmuddled mindfulness set up,
yet my body was turbulent,
not calmed,
because I was harassed in striving
by striving against that very pain.

But yet, Prince, that painful feeling,
arising in me,
persisted without impinging on my mind.

It occurred to me, Prince:

'Suppose that I should still meditate
the non-breathing meditation?'

So I, Prince, stopped breathing in and breathing out
through the mouth
and through the nose
and through the ears.

When I, Prince, had stopped breathing in and breathing out
through the mouth
and through the nose
and through the ears,
I came to have very bad headaches.

As, Prince, a strong man
might clamp a turban on one's head
with a tight leather strap,
even so when I, Prince, stopped breathing in and breathing out
through the mouth
and through the nose
and through the ears,
did I come to have very bad headaches.

Although, Prince, unsluggish energy came to be stirred up in me,
unmuddled mindfulness set up,
yet my body was turbulent,
not calmed,
because I was harassed in striving
by striving against that very pain.

But yet, Prince, that painful feeling,
arising in me,
persisted without impinging on my mind.

It occurred to me, Prince:

'Suppose now that I should still meditate
the non-breathing meditation?'

So I, Prince, stopped breathing in and breathing out
through the mouth
and through the nose
and through the ears.

When I, Prince, had stopped breathing in and breathing out
through the mouth
and through the nose
and through the ears,
very strong winds cut through my stomach.

As, Prince, a skilled cattle-butcher
or his apprentice
might cut through the stomach
with a sharp butcher's knife,
even so, Prince, did very strong winds
cut through my stomach.

Although, Prince, unsluggish energy came to be stirred up in me,
unmuddled mindfulness set up,
yet my body was turbulent,
not calmed,
because I was harassed in striving
by striving against that very pain.

But yet, Prince, that painful feeling,
arising in me,
persisted without impinging on my mind.

It occurred to me, Prince:

'Suppose now that I should still meditate
the non-breathing meditation?'

So I, Prince, stopped breathing in and breathing out
through the mouth
and through the nose
and through the ears.

When I, Prince, had stopped breathing in and breathing out
through the mouth
and through the nose
and through the ears,
there came to be a fierce heat in my body.

As, Prince, two strong men,
having taken hold of a weaker man by his limbs,
might set fire to him,
might make him sizzle up
over a charcoal pit,
even so, Prince,
when I had stopped breathing in and breathing out
through the mouth
and through the nose
and through the ears,
did there come to be a fierce heat in my body.

Although, Prince, unsluggish energy came to be stirred up in me,
unmuddled mindfulness set up,
yet my body was turbulent,
not calmed,
because I was harassed in striving
by striving against that very pain.

But yet, Prince, that painful feeling,
arising in me,
persisted without impinging on my mind.

In addition to this, Prince,
devatās, having seen me, spoke thus:

'The recluse Gotama has passed away.'

Other devatās spoke thus;

'The recluse Gotama has not passed away,
but he is passing away.'

Other devatās spoke thus:

'The recluse Gotama has not passed away,
nor is he passing away;
the recluse Gotama is a perfected one,
the mode of living of a perfected one
is just like this.'

It occurred to me, Prince:

'Suppose now that I should take the line
of desisting from all food?'

Then, Prince, devatās,
having approached me,
spoke thus:

'Do not, good sir,
take the line of desisting from all food.

If you, good sir,
take the line of desisting from all food,
then we will give you deva-like essences
to take in through the pores of the skin;
you will keep going by means of them.'

Then, Prince, it occurred to me:

'Suppose that I should take the line
of not eating anything,
and these devatās were to give me deva-like essences
to take in through the pores of the skin,
and that I should keep going by means of them,
that would be an imposture in me.'

So I, Prince, rejected those devatās
I said,
'Enough.'

It occurred to me, Prince:

'Suppose now that I were to take food
little by little,
drop by drop,
such as bean-soup
or vetoh-soup
or chick-pea-soup
or pea-soup?

So I, Prince, took food
little by little,
drop by drop,
such as bean-soup
or veteh-soup
or chick-pea-soup
or pea-soup.

While I, Prince, was taking food
little by little,
drop by drop,
such as bean-soup
or vetch-soup
or chick-pea-soup
or pea-soup,
my body became exceedingly emaciated.

Because I ate so little,
all my limbs became like the joints of withered creepers;
because I ate so little,
my buttocks became like a bullock's hoof;
because I ate so little,
my protruding backbone
became like a string of balls;
because I ate so little,
my gaunt ribs
became like the crazy rafters
of a tumble-down shed;
because I ate so little,
the pupils of my eyes
appeared lying low and deep;
because I ate so little,
my scalp became shrivelled and shrunk
as a bitter white gourd
cut before it is ripe
becomes shrivelled and shrunk by a hot wind.

If I, Prince, thought:

'I will touch the skin of my belly,'
it was my backbone that I took hold of.

If I thought:

'I will touch my backbone,'
it was the skin of my belly that I took hold of.

For because I ate so little,
the skin of my belly, Prince,
came to be cleaving to my backbone.

If I, Prince, thought:

'I will obey the calls of nature,'
I fell down on my face then and there,
because I ate so little.

If I, Prince, soothing my body,
stroked my limbs with my hand,
the hairs,
rotted at the roots,
fell away from my body
as I stroked my limbs with my hand,
because I ate so little.

And further, Prince, men,
having seen me,
spoke thus:

'The recluse Gotama is black.'

Other men spoke thus:

'The recluse Gotama is not black,
the recluse Gotama is deep brown.'

Some men spoke thus:

'The recluse Gotama is not black,
he is not even deep brown,
the recluse Gotama is of a sallow colour.'

To such an extent, Prince,
was my clear pure complexion
spoilt because I ate so little.

This, Prince, occurred to me:

'Some recluses and brahmans
in the past
have experienced feelings that were acute,
painful,
sharp,
severe;
but this is paramount,
nor is there worse than this.

And some recluses and brahmans
in the future
will experience feelings that are acute,
painful,
sharp,
severe;
but this is paramount,
nor is there worse than this.

And some recluses and brahmans
are now
experiencing feelings that are acute,
painful,
sharp,
severe;
but this is paramount,
nor is there worse than this.

But I,
by this severe austerity,
do not reach states of further-men,
the excellent knowledge and vision
befitting the ariyans.

Could there be another way to awakening?

This, Prince, occurred to me:

'I know that while my father, the Sakyan,
was ploughing,
and I was sitting in the cool shade of a rose-apple tree,
aloof from pleasures of the senses,
aloof from unskilled states of mind,
entering on the first meditation,
which is accompanied by initial thought
and discursive thought,
is born of aloofness,
and is rapturous and joyful,
and while abiding therein,
I thought:

'Now could this be a way to awakening?'

Then, following on my mindfulness, Prince,
there was the consciousness:

'This is itself the Way to awakening.'

This occurred to me, Prince:

'Now, am I afraid of that happiness
which is happiness
apart from sense-pleasures,
apart from unskilled states of mind?'

This occurred to me, Prince:

'I am not afraid of that happiness
which is happiness
apart from sense-pleasures,
apart from unskilled states of mind.'

This occurred to me, Prince:

'Now it is not easy to reach that happiness
by thus subjecting the body
to extreme emaciation.

Suppose I were to take material nourishment -
boiled rice
and sour milk?'

So I, Prince, took material nourishment -
boiled rice
and sour milk.

Now at that time, Prince,
five monks were attending me
and (they thought):

'When the recluse Gotama wins dhamma
he will announce it to us.'

But when I, Prince, took material nourishment -
boiled rice
and sour milk -
then these five monks turned on me in disgust,
saying:

'The recluse Gotama lives in abundance,
he is wavering in his striving,
he has reverted to a life of abundance.'

But when I, Prince, had taken some material nourishment,
having picked up strength,
aloof from pleasures of the senses,
aloof from unskilled states of mind,
I entered on
and abided in
the first meditation
which is accompanied by initial thought
and discursive thought,
is born of aloofness,
and is rapturous and joyful.

But yet, Prince, the pleasurable feeling, arising in me,
persisted without impinging on my mind.

By allaying initial thought
and discursive thought,
with the mind subjectively tranquillised
and fixed on one point,
I entered on
and abided in
the second meditation
which is devoid of initial and discursive thought,
is born of concentration,
and is rapturous and joyful.

But yet, Prince, the pleasurable feeling, arising in me,
persisted without impinging on my mind.

By the fading out of rapture
I dwelt with equanimity,
attentive and clearly conscious,
and I experienced in my person
that joy of which the ariyans say:
'Joyful lives he who has equanimity and is mindful,'
and I entered on
and abided in
the third meditation.

But yet, Prince, the pleasurable feeling, arising in me,
persisted without impinging on my mind.

By getting rid of joy
and by getting rid of anguish,
by the going down of former pleasures and sorrows,
I entered into
and abided in
the fourth meditation
which has neither anguish nor joy
and which is entirely purified
by equanimity and mindfulness.

But yet, Prince, the pleasurable feeling, arising in me,
persisted without impinging on my mind.

 


 

With the mind composed thus,
quite purified,
quite clarified,
without blemish,
without defilement,
grown soft and workable,
fixed,
immovable,
I directed my mind
to the knowledge and recollection
of former habitations:

I remembered a variety of former habitations, thus:
one birth,
two births,
three births,
four births,
five births,
ten births,
twenty births,
thirty births,
forty births,
fifty births,
a hundred births,
a thousand births,
a hundred thousand births,
and many an eon of integration
and many an eon of disintegration
and many an eon of integration-disintegration;
such a one was I by name,
having such and such a clan,
such and such a colour,
so was I nourished,
such and such pleasant and painful experiences were mine,
so did the span of life end.

Passing from this,
I came to be in another state
where such a one was I by name,
having such and such a clan,
such and such a colour,
so was I nourished,
such and such pleasant and painful experiences were mine,
so did the span of life end.

Passing from this,
I arose here.

Thus I remember divers former habitations
in all their modes and detail.

This, Prince,
was the first knowledge attained by me
in the first watch of the night;
ignorance was dispelled,
knowledge arose,
darkness was dispelled,
light arose,
even as I abided diligent,
ardent,
self-resolute.

Then with the mind composed,
quite purified,
quite clarified,
without blemish,
without defilement,
grown soft and workable,
fixed,
immovable,
I directed my mind
to the knowledge of the passing hence
and the arising of beings.

With the purified deva-vision
surpassing that of men
I see beings as they pass hence
or come to be;
I comprehend that beings are mean,
excellent,
comely,
ugly,
well-going,
ill-going,
according to the consequences of their deeds,
and I think:

Indeed these worthy beings
who were possessed of wrong conduct in body,
who were possessed of wrong conduct of speech,
who were possessed of wrong conduct of thought,
scoffers at the ariyans,
holding a wrong view,
incurring deeds consequent on a wrong view -
these, at the breaking up of the body after dying,
have arisen in a sorrowful state,
a bad bourn,
the abyss,
Niraya Hell.

But these worthy beings
who were possessed of good conduct in body,
who were possessed of good conduct in speech,
who were possessed of good conduct in thought,
who did not scoff at the ariyans,
holding a right view,
incurring deeds consequent on a right view -
these, at the breaking up of the body after dying,
have arisen in a good bourn,
a heaven world.

Thus with the purified deva-vision
surpassing that of men
do I see beings as they pass hence,
as they arise;
I comprehend that beings are mean,
excellent,
comely,
ugly,
well-going,
ill-going
according to the consequences of their deeds.

This, Prince,
was the second knowledge attained by me
in the middle watch of the night;
ignorance was dispelled,
knowledge arose,
darkness was dispelled,
light arose,
even as I abided diligent,
ardent,
self-resolute.[5]

Then Prince, it occurred to me:

'This dhamma, won to by me
is deep,
difficult to see,
difficult to understand,
tranquil,
excellent,
beyond dialectic,
subtle,
intelligible to the learned.

But this is a creation
delighting in sensual pleasure,
delighted by sensual pleasure,
rejoicing in sensual pleasure.

So that for a creation
delighting in sensual pleasure,
delighted by sensual pleasure,
rejoicing in sensual pleasure,
this were a matter difficult to see,
that is to say
causal uprising by way of condition.

This too were a matter difficult to see,
that is to say
the tranquillising of all the activities,
the renunciation of all attachment,
the destruction of craving,
dispassion,
stopping,
Nibbāna.

But if I were to teach dhamma
and others were not to understand me,
that would be a weariness to me,
that would be a vexation to me.

Moreover, Prince, these verses
not heard before in the past
spontaneously occurred to me:

This that through many toils I've won —
Enough! why should I make it known?
By folk with lust and hate consumed
This dhamma is not understood.

Leading on against the stream,
Deep, subtle, difficult to see, delicate,
Unseen 'twill be by passion's slaves
Cloaked in the murk of ignorance.

In such wise, as I was pondering, Prince,
my mind inclined to little effort
and not teaching dhamma.

Then, Prince, it occurred to Brahmā Sahampati
who knew with his mind
the reasoning in my mind:

'Alas, the world is lost,
alas, the world is destroyed,
inasmuch as the mind of the Tathāgata,
the perfected one,
the fully awakened one,
inclines to little effort
and not to teaching dhamma.'

Then, Prince,
as a strong man might stretch out his bent arm,
or might bend back his outstretched arm,
even so did Brahmā Sahampati,
vanishing from the Brahmā-world,
become manifest before me.

Then, Prince, Brahmā Sahampati,
having arranged his upper robe over one shoulder,
having saluted me with joined palms,
spoke thus to me:

'Lord, let the Lord teach dhamma,
let the well-farer teach dhamma;
there are beings with little dust in their eyes who;
not hearing dhamma,
are decaying,
(but if) they are learners of dhamma
they will grow.'

Thus spoke Brahmā Sahampati to me, Prince;
having said this,
he further spoke thus:

'There has appeared in Magadha before thee
An unclean dhamma by (minds) with stains devised.
Open this door of deathlessness; let them hear
Dhamma awakened to by the stainless one.

As on a crag on crest of mountain standing
A man might watch the people all around,
E'en so do thou, O Wisdom fair, ascending,
O Seer of all, the terraced heights of truth,
Look down, from grief released, upon the peoples
Sunken in grief, oppressed with birth and age.

Arise, thou hero! Conqueror in the battle!
Thou leader of the caravsn, without a debt!
Walk in the world. Let the Blessed One
Teach dhamma; they who learn will grow.'

And then I, Prince, having understood Brahmā's entreaty,
out of compassion
surveyed the world with the eye of an Awakened One.

As I, Prince, was surveying the world
with the eye of an Awakened One,
I saw beings with little dust in their eyes,
with much dust in their eyes,
with acute faculties
with dull faculties,
of good dispositions,
of bad dispositions,
docile,
indocile,
few seeing from fear
sins and the world beyond.

Even as in a pond of blue lotuses
or in a pond of red lotuses
or in a pond of white lotuses,
a few red lotuses,
a few blue lotuses,
a few white lotuses
are born in the water,
grow in the water,
do not rise above the water
but thrive while alltogether immersed;
a few blue lotuses,
a few red lotuses,
a few white lotuses
are born in the water,
grow in the water
and reach the surface of the water
a few blue lotuses,
a few red lotuses,
a few white lotuses
are born in the water,
grow in the water
and stand rising out of the water,
undefiled by the water;
even so did I, Prince,
surveying the world with the eye of an Awakened One,
see beings with little dust in their eyes,
with much dust in their eyes,
with acute faculties,
with dull faculties,
of good dispositions,
of bad dispositions,
docile,
indocile,
few seeing from fear
sins and the world beyond.

Then I, Prince, addressed Brahmā Sahampati in verses:

Opened for those who hear are the doors of the Deathless, Brahmā,
Let them give forth their faith;
Thinking of useless fatigue, Brahmā, I have not preached dhamma
Sublime and excellent for men.

Then, Prince, Brahmā Sahampati, thinking:

'The opportunity was made by me
for the Lord to teach dhamma,'

having greeted me,
keeping his right side towards me,
vanshed then and there.

Then it occurred to me, Prince:

'Now, to whom should I first teach this dhamma?

Who will understand this dhamma quickly?'

Then it occurred to me, Prince:

'Indeed this Āḷāra the Kālāma is learned,
experienced,
wise,
and for a long time has had little dust in his eyes.

Suppose that I were to teach dhamma first to Āḷāra the Kālāma
he will understand this dhamma quickly.

Then devatās having approached me,
spoke thus:

Lord, Āḷāra the Kālāma passed away seven days ago.'

So knowledge and vision arose in me
that Āḷāra the Kālāma had passed away seven days ago.

Then it occurred to me, Prince:

'Āḷāra the Kālāma has suffered a great loss.

For if he had heard this dhamma,
he would have understood it quickly.'

Then it occurred to me, Prince:

'Now, to whom could I first teach this dhamma?

Who will understand this dhamma quickly?

Then it occurred to me, Prince:

'This Uddaka, Rāma's son, is learned,
experienced,
wise,
and for a long time has had little dust in his eyes.

Suppose that I were to teach dhamma first to Uddaka, Rāma's son?

He will understand this dhamma quickly,'

Then, Prince, devatās, having approached me,
spoke thus:

'Lord, Uddaka, Rāma's son, passed away last night,'

So knowledge and vision arose in me
that Uddaka, Rāma's son,
had passed away last night.

Then it occurred to me, Prince:

'Uddaka, Rāma's son, has suffered a great loss.

For if he had heard this dhamma,
he would have understood it quickly.

Then it occured to me, Prince:

'Now to whom could I first teach this dhamma?

Who will understand this dhamma quickly?

Then it occurred to me, Prince:

'This group of five monks
who waited on me
when I was self-resolute in striving,
were very helpful.

Suppose that I were to teach dhamma first to this group of five monks?

Then it occurred to me, monks:

'But where is the group of five monks staying at present?

Then, monks I saw with deva-vision,
purified
and surpassing that of men,
the group of five monks
staying near Benares
at Isipatana
in the deer-park.

Then I, monks, having stayed at Uruvelā
for as long as I found suiting,
set out on tour for Benares.

Then, monks, Upaka,
the Naked Ascetic,
saw me as I was going along the high road
between Gayā and the (Tree of) Awakening;
having seen me,
he spoke thus:

'Your reverence,
your faculties are quite pure,
your complexion is very bright,
very clear.

On account of whom
have you, your reverence, gone forth,
or who is your teacher,
or whose dhamma do you profess?'

When this had been said,
I, monks, addressed Upaka, the Naked Ascetic,
in verses:

'Victorious over all, omniscient am I,
Among all things undefiled,
Leaving all, through death of craving freed,
By knowing for myself, whom should I point to?

For me there is no teacber,
One like me does not exist,
In the world with its devas
No one equals me.

For I am perfected in tbe world,
A teacher supreme am I,
I alone am all-awakened,
Become cool am I, Nibbāna-attained.

To turn the dhamma-wheel
I go to Kasi's city,
Beating the drum of deathlessness
In a world that's blind become.'

'According to what you claim, your reveraence,
you ought to be victor of the unending.'

'Like me, they are victors indeed
Who have won destruciion of the cankers;
Vanquished by me are evil things,
Therefore am I, Upaka, a victor.'

When this had been said, Prince,
Upaka the Naked Ascetic, having said:

'May it be (so), your reverence"

having shaken his head,
went off having taken a different road.

Then I, Prince, walking on tour,
in due course arrived at Benares,
Isipatana,
the deer-park
and the group of five monks.

Prince, the group of five monks
saw me coming in the distance,
and seeing me
they agreed among themselves, saying:

'Your reverences, this recluse Gotama is coming,
he lives in abundance,
he is wavering in his striving,
he has reverted to a life of abundance.

He should be neither greeted,
nor stood up for,
nor should his bowl and robe be received;
all the same
a seat may be put out,
he can sit down if he wants to.'

But as I, Prince, gradually approached this group of five monks,
so this group of five monks
were not able to adhere to their own agreement;
having approached me
some received my bowl and robe,
some made a seat ready,
some brought water for washing the feet,
and they addressed me by my name
and with the epithet 'your reverence.'

When this had been said,
I, Prince, spoke thus to the group of five monks:

'Do not, monks, address a Tathāgata by his name
or by the epithet 'your reverence.'

Monks, the Tathāgata is one perfected, a fully Self-awakened One.

Give ear, monks, the deathless is found,
I instruct, I teach dhamma.

Going along in accordance with what is enjoined,
having soon realised here and now
by your own super-knowledge
that supreme goal of the Brahmā-faring
for the sake of which young men of family
rightly go forth from home
into homelessness,
you will abide in it.'

When this had been said, Prince,
the group of five monks addressed me thus:

'But you, reverend Gotama,
did not come to a state of further-men,
to knowledge and vision befitting the Ariyans
by this conduct,
by this course,
by this practice of austerities.

So how can you now
come to a state of further-men,
to knowledge and vision befitting the Ariyans
when you live in abundance
and, wavering in your striving,
revert to a life of abundance?'

When this had been said, Prince, I spoke to the group of five monks thus:

'A Tathāgata, monks,
does not live in abundance
nor, wavering in striving,
does he revert to a life of abundance.

The Tathāgata, monks,
is one perfected,
a fully Self-awakened One.

Give ear, monks,
the deathless is found,
I instruct,
I teach dhamma.

Going along in accordance with what is enjoined,
having soon realised here and now
by your own super-knowledge
that supreme goal of the Brahmā-faring
for the sake of which young men of family
rightly go forth from home
into homelessness,
you will abide in it.'

And a second time, Prince, the group of five monks spoke to me thus:

'But you, reverend Gotama,
did not come to a state of further-men,
to knowledge and vision befitting the Ariyans
by this conduct,
by this course,
by this practice of austerities.

So how can you now
come to a state of further-men,
to knowledge and vision befitting the Ariyans
when you live in abundance
and, wavering in your striving,
revert to a life of abundance?'

When this had been said, Prince, I spoke to the group of five monks thus:

'A Tathāgata, monks,
does not live in abundance
nor, wavering in striving,
does he revert to a life of abundance.

The Tathāgata, monks,
is one perfected,
a fully Self-awakened One.

Give ear, monks,
the deathless is found,
I instruct,
I teach dhamma.

Going along in accordance with what is enjoined,
having soon realised here and now
by your own super-knowledge
that supreme goal of the Brahmā-faring
for the sake of which young men of family
rightly go forth from home
into homelessness,
you will abide in it.'

And a third time, monks, the group of five monks spoke to me thus:

'But you, reverend Gotama,
did not come to a state of further-men,
to knowledge and vision befitting the Ariyans
by this conduct,
by this course,
by this practice of austerities.

So how can you now
come to a state of further-men,
to knowledge and vision befitting the Ariyans
when you live in abundance
and, wavering in your striving,
revert to a life of abundance?'

When this had been said,
I, Prince, spoke thus to the group of five monks:

'Do you allow, monks,
that I have ever spoken to you like this before?'

'You have not, Lord.'

The Tathāgata, monks,
is one perfected,
a fully Self-awakened One.

Give ear, monks,
the deathless is found,
I instruct,
I teach dhamma.

Going along in accordance with what is enjoined,
having soon realised here and now
by your own super-knowledge
that supreme goal of the Brahmā-faring
for the sake of which young men of family
rightly go forth from home
into homelessness,
you will abide in it.'

And I, Prince, was able to convince the group of five monks.

Prince, I now exhorted two monks;
three monks walked for almsfood.

Whatever the three monks who had walked for alms- food brought back,
that the group of six lived on.

And then, Prince, I exhorted three monks;
two monks walked for almsfood.

Whatever the two monks who had walked for almsfood brought back,
that the group of six lived on.

Then, Prince, the group of five monks,
being thus exhorted,
thus instructed by me,
soon realising here and now
by their own super-knowledge
that matchless goal of the Brahma-faring
for the sake of which young men of family
rightly go forth from home into homelessness,
entering on it abided in it."

When this had been said,
Prince Bodhi spoke thus to the Lord:

"After how long, revered sir,
does a monk
taking the Tathāgata as a leader,
and having by his own super-knowledge
realised here and now
that matchless goal of the Brahma-faring
for the sake of which young men of family
rightly go forth from home into homelessness,
entering on it, abide in it?"

"Well then, Prince,
I will ask you a question about this in return.

As it may please you,
so should you answer it.

What do you think about this, Prince?

Are you skilled in elephant-riding,
in the art of handling a goad?"

"Yes, I, revered sir, am skilled in elephant-riding,
in the art of handling a goad."

"What do you think about this, Prince?

A man might come along here, and think:

'Prince Bodhi knows how to ride elephants
and the art of handling the goad.

I will train myself in elephant-riding
and the art of handhng the goad under him.'

But had he no faith
he could not attain
whatever is to be won by faith;
and had he [282] poor health
he could not attain
whatever is to be won by good health;
and if he were fraudulent and deceitful
he could not attain
whatever is to be won by honesty
and the absence of deceit;
and if he were lazy
he could not attain
whatever is to be won by the output of energy;
and if he were poor in wisdom
he could not attain
whatever is to be won by one of wisdom.

What do you think about this, Prince?

Could that man train himself
in elephant-riding
and the art of handling the goad under you?"

"Assuredly, revered sir,
if that man were possessed of (such) qualities,
he could not train himself in elephant-riding
and the art of handling the goad under me.

But who speaks of five qualities?"

"What do you think about this, Prince?

A man might come along here, and think:

'Prince Bodhi knows how to ride elephants
and the art of handling the goad.

I will train myself in elephant-riding
and the art of handling the goad under him.'

And if he had faith
he could attain
whatever is to be won by faith;
and if he had good health
he could attain
whatever is to be won by good health;
and if he were not fraudulent or deceitful
he could attain
whatever is to be won by honesty
and the absence of deceit;
and if he had an output of energy
he could attain
whatever is to be won by output of energy;
and if he were one of wisdom
he could attain
whatever is to be won by one of wisdom.

What do you think about this, Prince?

Could that man train himself in elephant-riding
and in the art of handling the goad under you?"

"Assuredly, revered sir,
if that man were possessed of (such) quahties,
he could train himself in elephant-riding
and the art of handhng the goad under me.

But who speaks of five qualities?"

"Even so, Prince,
are these five qualities for striving.[6]

What five?

As to this, Prince,
a monk has faith;
he has faith in the awakening of the Tathāgata, and thinks:

'Indeed this is the Lord,
perfected one,
fully Self-Awakened One,
endowed with knowledge and (right) conduct,
Well-farer,
knower of the worlds,
incomparable charioteer of men to be tamed,
teacher of devas and men,
the Awakened One,
the Lord.'

He is well,
in good health,
endowed with a good digestion,
not over-cool,
not over-hot,
but of a middle kind
suitable for striving.

He is not fraudulent,
not deceitful,
but shows himself as he really is
to the Teacher
or the learned
among his fellow Brahma-farers.

He dwells with energy stirred up[7]
for getting rid of unskilled states,
for arousing skilled states,
steadfast,
firm in advance,
persevering amid skilled states.

He is one of wisdom
endowed with wisdom[7]
leading to (the cutting off of) rise and fall,
with ariyan[8] [283] discrimination
leading to the complete destruction of anguish.

These, Prince, are the five qualities for striving.

If, Prince, a monk is possessed of these five qualities for striving,
taking the Tathāgata for leader,
having by his own super-knowledge
realised here and now
that matchless goal of the Brahma-faring
for the sake of which young men of family
rightly go forth from home into homelessness,
entering on it he may abide in it
within seven years.

Let be the seven years, Prince.

If a monk is possessed of these five qualities for striving,
taking the Tathāgata for leader,
having by his own super-knowledge
realised here and now
that matchless goal of the Brahma-faring
for the sake of which young men of family
rightly go forth from home into homelessness,
entering on it he may abide in it
in it in six years.

Let be the six years, Prince.

If a monk is possessed of these five qualities for striving,
taking the Tathāgata for leader,
having by his own super-knowledge
realised here and now
that matchless goal of the Brahma-faring
for the sake of which young men of family
rightly go forth from home into homelessness,
entering on it he may abide in it
in five years.

Let be the five years, Prince.

If a monk is possessed of these five qualities for striving,
taking the Tathāgata for leader,
having by his own super-knowledge
realised here and now
that matchless goal of the Brahma-faring
for the sake of which young men of family
rightly go forth from home into homelessness,
entering on it he may abide in it
in it in four years.

Let be the four years, Prince.

If a monk is possessed of these five qualities for striving,
taking the Tathāgata for leader,
having by his own super-knowledge
realised here and now
that matchless goal of the Brahma-faring
for the sake of which young men of family
rightly go forth from home into homelessness,
entering on it he may abide in it
in it in three years.

Let be the three years, Prince.

If a monk is possessed of these five qualities for striving,
taking the Tathāgata for leader,
having by his own super-knowledge
realised here and now
that matchless goal of the Brahma-faring
for the sake of which young men of family
rightly go forth from home into homelessness,
entering on it he may abide in it
in it in two years.

Let be the two years, Prince.

If a monk is possessed of these five qualities for striving,
taking the Tathāgata for leader,
having by his own super-knowledge
realised here and now
that matchless goal of the Brahma-faring
for the sake of which young men of family
rightly go forth from home into homelessness,
entering on it he may abide in it
in it in one year.

Let be one year, Prince.

If a monk is possessed of these five qualities for striving,
taking the Tathāgata for leader,
having by his own super-knowledge
realised here and now
that matchless goal of the Brahma-faring
for the sake of which young men of family
rightly go forth from home into homelessness,
entering on it he may abide in it
in it in seven months.

Let be seven months, Prince.

If a monk is possessed of these five qualities for striving,
taking the Tathāgata for leader,
having by his own super-knowledge
realised here and now
that matchless goal of the Brahma-faring
for the sake of which young men of family
rightly go forth from home into homelessness,
entering on it he may abide in it
in it in six months.

Let be six months, Prince.

If a monk is possessed of these five qualities for striving,
taking the Tathāgata for leader,
having by his own super-knowledge
realised here and now
that matchless goal of the Brahma-faring
for the sake of which young men of family
rightly go forth from home into homelessness,
entering on it he may abide in it
in it in five months.

Let be five months, Prince.

If a monk is possessed of these five qualities for striving,
taking the Tathāgata for leader,
having by his own super-knowledge
realised here and now
that matchless goal of the Brahma-faring
for the sake of which young men of family
rightly go forth from home into homelessness,
entering on it he may abide in it
in it in four months.

Let be four months, Prince.

If a monk is possessed of these five qualities for striving,
taking the Tathāgata for leader,
having by his own super-knowledge
realised here and now
that matchless goal of the Brahma-faring
for the sake of which young men of family
rightly go forth from home into homelessness,
entering on it he may abide in it
in it in three months.

Let be three months, Prince.

If a monk is possessed of these five qualities for striving,
taking the Tathāgata for leader,
having by his own super-knowledge
realised here and now
that matchless goal of the Brahma-faring
for the sake of which young men of family
rightly go forth from home into homelessness,
entering on it he may abide in it
in it in two months.

Let be two months, Prince.

If a monk is possessed of these five qualities for striving,
taking the Tathāgata for leader,
having by his own super-knowledge
realised here and now
that matchless goal of the Brahma-faring
for the sake of which young men of family
rightly go forth from home into homelessness,
entering on it he may abide in it
in it in one month.

Let be one month, Prince.

If a monk is possessed of these five qualities for striving,
taking the Tathāgata for leader,
having by his own super-knowledge
realised here and now
that matchless goal of the Brahma-faring
for the sake of which young men of family
rightly go forth from home into homelessness,
entering on it he may abide in it
in it in half a month.

Let be half a month, Prince.

If a monk is possessed of these five qualities for striving,
taking the Tathāgata for leader,
having by his own super-knowledge
realised here and now
that matchless goal of the Brahma-faring
for the sake of which young men of family
rightly go forth from home into homelessness,
entering on it he may abide in it
in it in seven days and nights.

Let be seven days and nights, Prince.

If a monk is possessed of these five qualities for striving,
taking the Tathāgata for leader,
having by his own super-knowledge
realised here and now
that matchless goal of the Brahma-faring
for the sake of which young men of family
rightly go forth from home into homelessness,
entering on it he may abide in it
in it in six days and nights.

Let be six days and nights, Prince.

If a monk is possessed of these five qualities for striving,
taking the Tathāgata for leader,
having by his own super-knowledge
realised here and now
that matchless goal of the Brahma-faring
for the sake of which young men of family
rightly go forth from home into homelessness,
entering on it he may abide in it
in it in five days and nights.

Let be five days and nights, Prince.

If a monk is possessed of these five qualities for striving,
taking the Tathāgata for leader,
having by his own super-knowledge
realised here and now
that matchless goal of the Brahma-faring
for the sake of which young men of family
rightly go forth from home into homelessness,
entering on it he may abide in it
in it in four days and nights.

Let be four days and nights, Prince.

If a monk is possessed of these five qualities for striving,
taking the Tathāgata for leader,
having by his own super-knowledge
realised here and now
that matchless goal of the Brahma-faring
for the sake of which young men of family
rightly go forth from home into homelessness,
entering on it he may abide in it
in it in three days and nights.

Let be three days and nights, Prince.

If a monk is possessed of these five qualities for striving,
taking the Tathāgata for leader,
having by his own super-knowledge
realised here and now
that matchless goal of the Brahma-faring
for the sake of which young men of family
rightly go forth from home into homelessness,
entering on it he may abide in it
in it in two days days and nights.

Let be two days and nights, Prince.

If a monk is possessed of these five qualities for striving,
taking the Tathāgata for leader,
having by his own super-knowledge
realised here and now
that matchless goal of the Brahma-faring
for the sake of which young men of family
rightly go forth from home into homelessness,
entering on it he may abide in it
in it in one day and night.

Let be the one day and night, Prince.

If a monk is possessed of these five quahties for striving,
taking the Tathāgata as leader,
if he is instructed in the evening
he will attain eminence
in the morning;
if he is instructed in the morning
he will attain eminence in the evening."

When this had been said, Prince Bodhi spoke thus to the Lord:

"O what an Awakened One,[9]
O what a dhamma,
O what a good teaching of dhamma
in that if one is instructed in the evening
he will attain eminence in the morning,
if instructed in the morning
he will attain eminence in the evening."

When this had been said,
the brahman youth Sañjikā's son,
spoke thus to Prince Bodhi:

"So this revered Bodhi speaks thus:

'O what an Awakened One,
0 what a dhamma,
0 what a good teaching of dhamma,'

but then he does not say:

'I am going to that revered Gotama for refuge
and to dhamrn
and to the Order of monks.'"

"Do not, good Sañjikā's son, speak thus;
do not, good Sañjikā's son, speak thus.

Face to face with my mother,
good Sañjikā's son,
have I heard this,
face to face have I learnt it.

There was a time, good Sañjikā's son,
when this Lord was staying at Kosambī
in Ghosita's monastery.

Then my mother,
who was with child, [284] approached the Lord;
having approached,
having greeted the Lord,
she sat down at a respectful distance.

As she was sitting down at a respectful distance
my mother spoke thus to the Lord:

'Revered sir, my unborn child,
whether a boy or a girl,
is going to the Lord for refuge
and to dhamma
and to the Order of monks.

May the Lord accept this layfollower
who is going for refuge
from this day forth
for as long as life lasts.'

There was the time,
good Sañjikā's son,
when the Lord was staying here itself
among the Bhaggas
in Suṁsumāragira in Bhesakaḷā Grove
in the deer-park.

Then my nurse,
carrying me on her hip,
approached the Lord;
having approached
and having greeted the Lord,
she stood at a respectful distance.

As she was standing at a respectful distance,
my nurse spoke thus to the Lord:

'This, revered sir,
is Prince Bodhi
who is going for refuge to the Lord
and to dhamma
and to the Order of monks.

May the Lord accept this layfollower
who is going for refuge
from this day forth
for as long as life lasts.'

Now I, good Sañjikā's son,
am going for the third time
to the Lord for refuge
and to dhamma
and to the Order of monks,
thinking:

'May the Lord accept me
as a layfollower
going for refuge from this day forth
for as long as life lasts.'"

Discourse to Prince Bodhi:
The Fifth

 


[1] As far as p. 280 below; "Prince Bodhi ... sat down at a respectful distance," occurs also at Vin. ii. 127 f. For notes see B.D. v. 176 ff. See also opening of M. Sta. No. 53.

[2] Or, western.

[3] apaloketi, but Vin. ii. 128 reads anukampati.

[4] As at M. i. 93 (M.L.S. I 123).

[5] I.e. read as far as the second occurrence of this phrase on p. 303 of vol. i. The sentence, "the pleasurable feeling, arising in me, persisted without impinging on my mind," found in vol. i, does not occur in Discourse No. 85.

[6] As at M. ii. 128; A. iii. 65; D. iii. 237.

[7] As at M. i. 356.

[8] MA. iii. 326 explains as "pure," suddha.

[9] aho buddho, etc.; cf. Thag. 201, where aho is translated aa "All hail."

 


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