Aŋguttara Nikāya


[Home]  [Sutta Indexes]  [Glossology]  [Site Sub-Sections]


 

Aŋguttara Nikāya
VIII. Aṭṭhaka Nipāta
IV. Dāna Vagga

The Book of the Gradual Sayings
The Book of the Eights
IV: On Giving

Sutta 39

Puññ-ā-bhisanda Suttaɱ

Yields

Translated from the Pali by E.M. Hare.

Copyright The Pali Text Society
Commercial Rights Reserved
Creative Commons Licence
For details see Terms of Use.

 


[245] [167]

[1][than][bodh] Thus have I heard:

Once the Exalted One was dwelling near Sāvatthī,
at Jeta Grove,
in Anāthapiṇḍika's Park.

There the Exalted One addressed the monks, saying:

"Monks."

"Yes, lord," they replied, and the Exalted One said:

"Monks, there are these eight yields in merit[1] and goodness,
the food of happiness,
celestial,
resulting in happiness,
leading heavenward,[2]
which are conducive to what is pleasing,
lovely,
precious,
beneficial
and to happiness.

What eight?

 

§

 

Herein, monks, an Ariyan disciple has found refuge in the Buddha.

This, monks, is the first yield in merit and goodness,
the food of happiness,
celestial,
resulting in happiness,
leading heavenward,
which is conducive to what is pleasing,
lovely,
precious,
beneficial
and to happiness.

Again, monks, an Ariyan disciple has found refuge in Dhamma.

This is the second yield in merit and goodness,
the food of happiness,
celestial,
resulting in happiness,
leading heavenward,
which is conducive to what is pleasing,
lovely,
precious,
beneficial
and to happiness.

[168]Again, monks, an Ariyan disciple has found refuge in the Order.

This is the third yield in merit and goodness,
the food of happiness,
celestial,
resulting in happiness,
leading heavenward,
which is conducive to what is pleasing,
lovely,
precious,
beneficial
and to happiness.

 

§

 

Monks, there are these five gifts,[3]
great gifts,
recognized from the first,
known for many a day,
known by tradition,
ancient,
and unconfounded;
not being confounded in the past,
they have not become confounded,
nor will they become confounded;
they are not scorned by discerning recluse or godly man.[4]

What five?

Herein, monks, an Ariyan disciple
abandons taking life and abstains therefrom.

Thus abstaining,
to unnumbered beings he gives without fear;
he gives without hatred;
he gives without ill-will:
and in giving without fear,
hatred
or ill-will,
he becomes a partaker in unbounded fearlessness,
amity
and goodwill.

This, monks, is the first gift
great gift,
recognized from the first,
known for many a day,
known by tradition,
ancient,
and unconfounded;
not being confounded in the past,
not become confounded,
nor will it become confounded;
not scorned by discerning recluse or godly man.

-◦-

This, monks, is the fourth yield in merit and goodness,
the food of happiness,
celestial,
resulting in happiness,
leading heavenward,
which is conducive to what is pleasing,
lovely,
precious,
beneficial
and to happiness.

Again, monks, an Ariyan disciple abandons stealing.

Thus abstaining,
to unnumbered beings he gives without fear;
he gives without hatred;
he gives without ill-will:
and in giving without fear,
hatred
or ill-will,
he becomes a partaker in unbounded fearlessness,
amity
and goodwill.

This, monks, is the second gift
great gift,
recognized from the first,
known for many a day,
known by tradition,
ancient,
and unconfounded;
not being confounded in the past,
not become confounded,
nor will it become confounded;
not scorned by discerning recluse or godly man.

-◦-

This, monks, is the fifth yield in merit and goodness,
the food of happiness,
celestial,
resulting in happiness,
leading heavenward,
which is conducive to what is pleasing,
lovely,
precious,
beneficial
and to happiness.

Again, monks, an Ariyan disciple abandons all lustful evil ways.

Thus abstaining,
to unnumbered beings he gives without fear;
he gives without hatred;
he gives without ill-will:
and in giving without fear,
hatred
or ill-will,
he becomes a partaker in unbounded fearlessness,
amity
and goodwill.

This, monks, is the third gift
great gift,
recognized from the first,
known for many a day,
known by tradition,
ancient,
and unconfounded;
not being confounded in the past,
not become confounded,
nor will it become confounded;
not scorned by discerning recluse or godly man.

-◦-

This, monks, is the sixth yield in merit and goodness,
the food of happiness,
celestial,
resulting in happiness,
leading heavenward,
which is conducive to what is pleasing,
lovely,
precious,
beneficial
and to happiness.

Again, monks, an Ariyan disciple abandons lying.

Thus abstaining,
to unnumbered beings he gives without fear;
he gives without hatred;
he gives without ill-will:
and in giving without fear,
hatred
or ill-will,
he becomes a partaker in unbounded fearlessness,
amity
and goodwill.

This, monks, is the fourth gift
great gift,
recognized from the first,
known for many a day,
known by tradition,
ancient,
and unconfounded;
not being confounded in the past,
not become confounded,
nor will it become confounded;
not scorned by discerning recluse or godly man.

-◦-

This, monks, is the seventh yield in merit and goodness,
the food of happiness,
celestial,
resulting in happiness,
leading heavenward,
which is conducive to what is pleasing,
lovely,
precious,
beneficial
and to happiness.

Again, monks, an Ariyan disciple abandons the use of intoxicants, which cause indolence, and abstains therefrom.

Thus abstaining,
to unnumbered beings he gives without fear;
he gives without hatred;
he gives without ill-will:
and in giving without fear,
hatred
or ill-will,
he becomes a partaker in unbounded fearlessness,
amity
and goodwill.

This, monks, is the fifth gift
great gift,
recognized from the first,
known for many a day,
known by tradition,
ancient,
and unconfounded;
not being confounded in the past,
not become confounded,
nor will it become confounded;
not scorned by discerning recluse or godly man.

-◦-

This, monks, is the eighth yield in merit and goodness,
the food of happiness,
celestial,
resulting [169] in happiness,
leading heavenward,
which is conducive to what is pleasing,
lovely,
precious,
beneficial
and to happiness.

Monks, these are the eight yields in merit and goodness.

 


[1] Cf. S. v, 391; [SN 5.55.31 Woodward] A. ii, 54; [AN 4.51 Woodward] iii, 51. [AN 5.45 Hare]

[2] This phrase reours at D. i, 51 (see D.A. i, 158); A. iii, 46.

[3] Dānāni. Comy. cetanādānāniɱ. determinations in giving; Pts. of C. 199.

[4] Cf. A. ii, 30; S. iii, 71.


Contact:
E-mail
Copyright Statement