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 [Dittha-Dhamma Loka-Dhamma]


 

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2019

newWhat's New?

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For example: ~/dhammatalk/dhammatalk_forum/whats.new.htm#O.2.21.19

 


 

Oblog: [O.3.17.19] Sunday, March 17, 2019 10:39 AM

[AN 10.48] Ten Things, the M. Olds translation.
Linked to the Pali, the Woodward translation, the Bhikkhu Thanissaro translation and the Piyadassi Thera translation.
Ten things (dhammas) that should be kept in mind by a bhikkhu. Good things for one and all to keep in mind, but of special importance to a bhikkhu, for the fall for one who has joined the order and is therefore representative of the Buddha and the Dhamma is much more serious. For bhikkhus this should be a hair-raising sutta. A good sutta for comparing translations.

 


 

Oblog: [O.3.11.19] Monday, March 11, 2019 1:48 PM

The question is: When robots become smarter than humans, will they also be able to awaken to Nibbāna?

 


 

Oblog: [O.3.10.19] Sunday, March 10, 2019 6:52 AM

Did you know that Sherlock Holms was somewhat of an expert on Sri Lankan Buddhism? See "The Sign of the Four"; Sir Arthur Conan Doyle, 1890.
Did you know that the father of the character 'Lawrence' in Lawrence Durrell's The Alexandria Quartet translated the Pali in a multi-volume work? Set c WWII; see especially "Balthazar".

 

Oblog: [O.3.10.19.2] 6:52 AM

Simple:

12:00 AM = Day begins;
12:00 PM = Night begins.

Refrain from eating at Night, at a wrong time = refrain from eating past 12:00 High Noon. Previously I (and others) have suggested a 'noon hour' (12:00 to 1:00), or 'two-finger-shadow of an upright stick, but this does not fit the uses such as suggested by the statement of the disadvantages of giving to the gods 'after the sun is full up'. [see e.g.: MN 112; AN 5.228]

 


 

'Monks, there are these five disadvantages
in a family who eat
when the sun is right up.

What five?

Their honoured visitors
they honour not in time;

the devas who receive oblations
they honour not in time;

recluses and brāhmans
who have but one meal a day
abstain from eating at night,
eating at wrong times,
they honour not in time;

their slaves,
work-folk
and men
work as men averse from work;

moreover as long as food is eaten unseasonably
it lacks strengthening qualities.

Monks, these are the five disadvantages
in a family who eat
when the sun is right up.'

 


 

Oblog: [O.3.8.19] Friday, March 08, 2019 6:00 AM

[SN 5.55.22] Mahānāma (2), The M. Olds translation.
Linked to the Pali, the Woodward translation, and the Bhikkhu Thanissaro translation.
Because Mahanama is occasionally beset with sense-desires he is concerned about his future destiny. The Buddha tells him not to fear for he has long had faith, virtue, learning, the practice of letting go, and insight. His mind is likened to a tree that is bent to an angle; when it is cut down, it falls in the direction of its bent.
This sutta supports the idea that the thoughts on one's mind at the time of death are highly determinate of one's future rebirth. I do not recall that this idea is stated explicitly anywhere in the suttas.

 

Oblog: [O.3.8.19.2] 6:00 AM
Revised: Saturday, March 09, 2019 6:20 AM

Exercise

Go to your place to be alone, prepare your seat, sit down sitting up straight, legs folded in front forming a lap, and take the mind from wherever it is wandering around and place it on the area around the mouth.

Think of this as your center.

The point of having a center is to have a place around which you can organize your mind and from which you start out on sitting down to sit and to which you can return when thoughts peter out or become confused. There is more to this than that, and to demonstrate just one feature is the point of this exercise.

Next, with mind kept focused on the mouth, locate the breathing. In the same way as with Satipatthana practice, make yourself aware of the in and out breaths. The point of this exercise is not to concentrate on the breathing. Let that idea go. See the breathing from the base of the stomach to the area around the mouth as a vibrating energy field.

Take this energy field as the body itself; the whole body. See how your idea of 'my body' is eminating from this energy configuration.

Then imagine this energy configuation as a one-stringed musical instrument. As the string vibrates, in place of a sound, see that: 'in accordance with the vibration, so is your body and the world in which it is located being created.' When the string is vibrating chaotically, so is your world; when the string is still, your world is calm.

So what you want to do now is to still, calm and tranquillize that vibrating string.

At the point where that string becomes very still you may see the world split into what appears like two mirrors facing each other at an angle; again with the world streaming off in both directions from the center divide. The images on either side will appear flat; one-dimensional. (Three-dimensional vision occurs when the images of the two mirrors are superimposed on each other in normal perception.)

Many different things can be discovered with this perception, but do not pay any attention to them at this point.

What you want to do at this point; and it may happen spontaneously; is to take the center line (the string) and shrink it down to one point located in the area around the mouth.

From the point where you have focused the mind on your mouth and the breathing process - keeping the focus on the mouth, not extending it to the whole body, continue to keep this dual perception (mouth and breath) in focus.

It is clear in the suttas that there are two main approaches to awakening: you can basically just sit there with the determination that you will not get up again until you have achieved awakening (I know when I am not free; I will know when I am free); or, as more frequently practiced, one can work one's way through one's blindness a problem at a time according to a graduated path. In other words the concentration practice described to this point can be used as a brute-force path to awakening but will here be described as the vehicle to use to pass from one state of awareness to another (arriving at one level of consciousness by abandoning another) until all barriors to awakening have been dealt with individually. Zero point center > problem under investigation > zero point center ... etc. Step-by-step all the way to Nibbāna.

p.p. explains it all — p.p.

This is the center-point, the absolute zero of your center.

This focus on your 'center' is something like tacking into the wind for the sailor. It is concentration on zero with the result that the longer it is held steady, the higher and more refined and more interesting and more yielding to insight will be the visions that appear to the mind's eye.

At the appearance of any interesting memory; or after having intentionally focused on some subject, in stead of withdrawing from the perception of the resulting images and returning to focus on the breathing (as the conventional approach to Satipatthana practice is taught), continue to return in stead to the thing being seen, the story or the logic or even the fantasy you are following.

Continue to concentrate on this one subject. It may be necessary to return to it again and again over an extended period of time alternating between concentration on the area of the mouth and the breating and your subject, but sooner or later what will happen is that the story under examination will 'open up' and reveal what was not seen before.

It does not really matter how significant the subject; there is no detail of your life that does not connect to all the others; everything supports everything else and leads to everything else.

The point of this exercise is to demonstrate one of the basic functions of Satipatthana practice. What Satipatthana practice is not about is concentration on the breathing. This concentration is simply a tool in aid of insight. What Satipatthana practice is about is providing a framework (Bhk. Thanissaro's translation for Satipatthana, which is a bad translation, but a good description of the actual function of this practice) onto which one hangs one's understanding of this 'being' that we are identifying with. You take your problem, or your memory, or your fantasy and you examine it for its elements relating to personal form (body); sense-experience; mental states; and the Dhamma. What you are doing is examining phenomena through the lens of the Dhamma.

This practice of doggedly examining in this way through the lens of the Dhamma is the practice of yoniso-manisikara, or tracing things back to their point of origin. It might well also be called 'vicara' 'examination'. It might also be called 'vicaya' 'research'. It might also be called 'vimaɱsa' 'reminiscence' or 'investigation'. However it fits into the Dhamma the result in 'opening up' is the 'falling off' of blindness, or what you did not previously see of what was there all along and that would be 'vipassana' 'insight'.

 


 

Oblog: [O.3.7.19] Thursday, March 07, 2019 8:51 AM

[SN 5.55.21] Mahānāma (1), The M. Olds translation.
Linked to the Pali, the Woodward translation, and the Bhikkhu Thanissaro translation.
Because Mahanama is occasionally beset with sense-desires he is concerned about his future destiny. The Buddha tells him not to fear for he has long had faith, virtue, learning, the practice of letting go, and insight. His mind is likened to the butter in a crock of butter tossed into a pond where when the crock cracks open the butter rises to the surface.

 


 

Oblog: [O.3.4.19] Monday, March 04, 2019 5:17 AM

"Learn to think like a thief"
says the Ajhan[1]

And he and the bhikkhu (beggar) being instructed are delighted by this way of conceiving the mental attitude of the aspirant. After all, it teaches waryness, alertness, sense of danger and alertness to opportunity. But through such a dangerous vehicle! And a vehicle concerning which there is so little really good information. It reminds me of the destiny of one who practices the habits of dogs or cows.[2] And there is the danger in that tool of the bhikkhus and the Saŋgha being called a den of thieves. On the other hand, if one were seeking out an instructive model, what about using the one given us by the Sammā-Saɱ-Buddha and his 84,000 lessons and:

Learn to think like a beggar

 


[1]An instruction given to Bhk. Thanissaro at an early point in his training: [Bhk. Thanissaro: Think Like a Thief "Shortly before my ordination, my teacher — Ajaan Fuang Jotiko — told me: "If you want to learn, you'll have to think like a thief and figure out how to steal your knowledge."

[2] MN 57.

See also: AN 10.48; AN 10.101.

Edit: Sunday, March 17, 2019 8:43 AM

'Castless have I now become'.

One who has gone forth should repeatedly reflect on this.

'Bound up in the reactions of others is my life'.

One who has gone forth should repeatedly reflect on this.

'What is proper for me to do is now different.'

One who has gone forth should repeatedly reflect on this.

- AN 10.48;

Oblog: [O.3.4.19.2] 7:15 AM

PDFVincent Arthur Smith, Asoka, the Buddhist emperor of India
E-pubVincent Arthur Smith, Asoka, the Buddhist emperor of India

Unread at this point. Cited in AN 10.19, n. 1

Oblog: [O.3.4.19.3] 8:52 AM

[DN 33] DN 33: The Recital: Introduction, by C.A.F. Rhys Davids

 


 

Oblog: [O.2.27.19] Wednesday, February 27, 2019 7:34 AM

Those that much covet are with gain so fond
That what they have not, that which they possess,
They scatter and unloose it from their bond,
And so, by hoping more, they have but less;
Or, gaining more, the profit of excess
  Is but to surfeit, and such griefs sustain,
  That they prove bankrupt in this poor-rich gain.

The aim of all[1] is but to nurse the life
With honour, wealth and ease, in waning age;
And in this aim there is such thwarting strife
That one for all or all for one we gage;
As life for honour in fell battle's rage;
  Honour for wealth; and oft that wealth doth cost
  The death of all, and all together lost.

So that in venturing ill we leave to be
The things we are for that which we expect;
And this ambitious foul infirmity,
In having much, torments us with defect
Of that we have: so then we do neglect
  The thing we have, and, all for want of wit,
  Make something nothing by augmenting it.

- The Rape of Lucrece, The Complete Works of William Shakespeare, The Cambridge Edition Text, as edited by William Aldis Wright, Doubleday, Doran & Compny, Inc., 1936

[1] For the Buddhist, this goes to far, but it is true of the unawakened nevertheless.

 


 

Oblog: [O.2.21.19] Thursday, February 21, 2019 7:12 AM

[AN 9.41] Tapussa the Householder, the M. Olds translation.
Linked to the Pali, the Hare translation, and the Bhikkhu Thanissaro translation.
The Buddha describes the benefits of giving all up and the dangers in pleasures of the senses. The essence of the sutta is a not too difficult to understand progression of lettings-go leading to Nibbana by way of the Jhānas.

This sutta has two interesting features. The first is that there is here the only case that I know of where 'vitakka' alone is said to be the obstruction to the second jhāna. To me this makes sense if one sees that although ultimately, there being no self there, all existing things come from the outside, it is thoughts that approach one, asking for attention, whereas pondering (vicara) is an action taken by the individual and is therefore more or less under one's control and is by that not so much of an obstruction as thinking.

The other interesting thing in this sutta is an apparent dissonance between the way it begins and the way it goes on after the Second Jhāna. The first part sets one pattern, but subsequent to the second jhāna another pattern is used. Further within the second pattern two other incompatable patterns are used. I found it impossible to reconcile the differences and what I have here in this translation is a reconstruction based on a pattern that makes sense to me. The Hare translation I have left abridged as he has it, so you can see the problem, and I have left the Pali also as it appears in the PTS texts, but I have also provided a second Pali reconstructed to parallel my translation. All other translations have the single occurance of 'vitakka' though none note it's uniqueness in the Pali. No translator notes the confusion of patterns. All versions can be found in the Index.

Oblog: [O.2.21.19.2] Thursday, February 21, 2019 9:48 AM

The Problem with Worldly Activisim

For the seeker after ultimate freedom, freedom of mind, freedom of heart, freedom of consciousness, the inniinvisable consciousness, living outside time, the Deathless, the unborn, Nibbāna, orientation towards getting creates the situation where every existing thing becomes an obstruction to this freedom, every effort to attain binds one more strongly to this world, not the least because of the anger and frustration likely to be experienced at not attaining; primarily because ultimate freedom cannot be attained while caught up in the sorts of points of view that inspire worldly activisim and the sorts of deeds that follow.

But for one oriented towards letting go, desire to change the world, improve the world, act in the world in any way is seen as the obstruction. That is the starting point, the background, the given, and there is no expectation that messing with the world will yield anything more than pain. And every even very transient experience of freedom that results from not-doing is seen as a blessing, a release, a reward, a confirmation that such ultimate freedom exists and can be found, a motivator, encouraging courage and fortitude in letting it all go.

For one unconcerned with personal escape from pain into ultimate freedom, of course, this is not seen as a problem. And teaching others, encouraging others in worldly activism is not seen as misguiding those who follow.

This is not to say that doing good deeds in the world, while maintaining an over-all orientation towards letting go, is not good kamma and correct practice. It is. And such deeds are encouraged as stepping stones to building confidence in letting go of what is hard to let go of. But, to use Don Juan's term, such deeds should always be seen as 'controlled folly'.

It can be seen that one can successfully use action to abandon action; desire to let go of desire, but the motive of changing the world even for the better is not that, it is a grasping after personal gain. Always!

Compassion for beings should be oriented towards their ultimate good and that is best taught by example and the example to be followed in this Dhamma is that of the Buddha letting it all go.

So say I.

Oblog: [O.2.21.19.3] Thursday, February 21, 2019 1:27 PM

Cetaso Ekodibhāvaɱ = Single Heart

The meaning is 'not duplicitous'.

King Henry VIII, William Shakespeare, Act V, iii, Cranmer:
"My good lords, hitherto, in all the progress
Both of my life and office, I have labour'd,
And with no little study, that my teaching
And the strong course of my authority
Might go one way, and safely; and the end
Was ever to do well: nor is there living,
I speak it with a single heart, my lords,
A man that more detests, more stirs against,
Both in his private conscience and his place,
Defacers of a public peace, than I do."

page 1361, Col. 2. The Complete Works of William Shakespeare, The Cambridge Edition Text, as edited by William Aldis Wright, Doubleday, Doran & Compny, Inc., 1936

Today we would say: 'single-minded' or 'whole-hearted' with the negative connotation being "having a one-track mind".

That 'might go one way' might also be the idea in back of 'Ekāyano'; again, not hypocritical or duplicitous or having a hidden adgenda.

 


 

Oblog: [O.2.12.19] Tuesday, February 12, 2019 8:41 AM

PDFThe Buddhist Monastic Code Volumes I & II combined. Volume I: The Pāṭimokkha Rules; Volume II (begins on page 643; see also the bookmarks): The Khandhaka Rules. Translated and Explained by Thānissaro Bhikkhu (Geoffrey DeGraff).
A paperback copy of this book is available free of charge. To request one write to: Book Request, Metta Forest Monastery, PO Box 1409, Valley Center, CA 92082 USA. Unless you are a bhikkhu, please consider making a donation to Metta Forest Monastery for this work.

From the Preface by Bhikkhu Thanissaro: "... a two-volume book that attempts to give an organized, detailed account of the Vinaya training rules and the traditions that have grown up around them. The Pāṭimokkha training rules as explained in the Sutta Vibhaṅga are the topic of the first volume; the rules found in the Khandhakas, the topic of the second. The book as a whole is aimed primarily at those whose lives are affected by the rules—bhikkhus who live by them, and other people who have dealings with the bhikkhus—so that they will be able to find gathered in one location as much essential information as possible on just what the rules do and do not entail. Students of Early Buddhism, Theravādin history, or contemporary Theravādin issues should also find this book interesting, as should anyone who is serious about the practice of the Dhamma and wants to see how the Buddha worked out the ramifications of Dhamma practice in daily life. The amount of information offered here is both the book’s strength and its weakness. On the one hand, it encompasses material that in some cases is otherwise unavailable in English or even in romanized Pali, and should be sufficient to serve as a life-long companion to any bhikkhu who seriously wants to benefit from the precise and thorough training the rules have to offer. On the other hand, the sheer size of the book and the mass of details to be remembered might prove daunting or discouraging to anyone just embarking on the bhikkhu’s life. To overcome this drawback, I have tried to organize the material in as clear-cut a manner as possible. In particular, in volume one I have analyzed each rule into its component factors so as to show not only the rule’s precise range but also how it connects to the general pattern of mindfully analyzing one’s own actions in terms of such factors as intention, perception, object, effort, and result—a system that plays an important role in the training of the mind. In volume two, I have gathered rules by subject so as to give a clear sense of how rules scattered randomly in the texts actually relate to one another in a coherent way."

 


 

Oblog: [O.2.10.19] Sunday, February 10, 2019 9:11 AM

 

Paṭhamam p'ahaɱ Bhikkhave jhānaɱ nissāya āsavānaɱ khayaɱ vadāmi.

By Means of the First Gnosis

Being a discourse based on the first section of
AN 9.36: Jhāna-Nisasaya Suttaɱ

 

Laid down at Sāvatthi:

"I say, beggars, that the destruction of the corrupting influences,
is had just by means of the First Gnosis."

Corrupting influences: Āsāvas: (1) Seeking out sense-pleasures, (2) the desire to exist, and (3) blindness as to the result of existence in pain. 'The destruction of the āsāvas:' is another way of naming Arahantship.

First Gnosis. Paṭhamaɱ-jhānaɱ. The first point at which one can know and see the point of the Dhamma and the method for attaining its ends. The fundamental nature or character of the first Gnosis is that there is here a conscious appreciation of the peace and calm of solitude. It is the first point at which actual experience shows one with the insight to appreciate it, the benefits of solitude.

This is what has been said,
and because of what is this said?

Taking himself to some place of solitude,
the root of some tree,
a cave on some mountainside,
a heap of straw in an open field,
or an empty hut;
sitting down,
sitting up straight,
head, neck and back in alignment with the perpindicular,
legs crossed Indian Style,
he minds the area around the mouth.

Legs crossed Indian Style For very long meditation sessions, better than either the full lotus or the half lotus - at least for those not brought up to using those postures - the Indian style, (that is the Native American 'Indian') where the legs are crossed in front of one, but do not overlap or rest under each other is the seat which can be maintained for the longest time with the least discomfort.

He minds the area around the mouth for the very simple reason that this is a very small, simple thing on which to focus and which serves as a 'center'. When you want to let it all go, you will want as little there to let go of as possible. The face is much more complex of a thing to let go than the mouth. It is also the mouth which is the starting point of existence in a body and it is further the place where most trouble begins (it is where you shovel in the food, and spew forth your bile). "Watch your mouth!" When this center is fully established, it then may prove valuable to mind the face, where one will find all the sense organs located and one can observe the reactions of such to sense-stimulus; or one may mind the interface of the body with the world, or of the body and the world as distinct from the mind, or mind to bring minding to the forefront of one's endeavours at setting up minding (1) the body, (2) the experiences, (3) the mental states and (4) The Dhamma. Start with minding around the mouth.

Here, beggars, a beggar is so separated from sense-pleasures,
separated from unskillful things,
that with thinking,
with pondering the appreciation
of the pleasures born of solitude
there is thus entrance into
and habituation of the First Gnosis.

Sense pleasures: (kāma) (1) Indulging in sights, (2) sounds, (3) scents, (4) savours, and (5) touches.

Unskillful things: (akusalehi dhammehi) The Nīvaraṇā: The Diversions: (1) Wishing for sense-pleasures; (2) deviance; (3) lazy ways and inertia; (4) fear and anxiety; (5) doubt and vacillation.

Then, whatever is to be had there,
of form,
of experience,
of perception,
of own-making,
of consciousness,

(1) Form, (2) experience, (3) perception, (4) own-making, (5) consciousness = the Khandhas. The stockpiled constituents of an existing being. When you 'sankhāra' that which you intend to create is stockpiled, awaiting an opportunity to manifest itself. Such opportunity is opened up the instant one takes action. Another way of saying: 'Everything that exists and exists in potentiality as an identified-with component of an existing being.'
(1) Form (rūpa): the shape or form or perceptable factor of whatever has become an existing thing, including sounds and other invisible things.
(2) Experience (vedanā): This is three things in English: 'experience', 'sense-experience' and 'sensation'. 'Experience' which is for the ordinary person 'sense-experience' and for the arahant 'extra-sensory experience'; 'sense-experience', for the ordinary person experiencing the results of contact of sense-organ with sense-object; and 'sensation,' for the ordinary person, the feeling of pleasure or pain or neither pleasure nor pain (not 'neutral' feeling; this is not a feeling, it is the absence of feeling and is another term for Nibbāna), for the arahant this is only the sensation that is neither pleasant nor painful;
(3) Perception (saññā): The first awareness of a thing or the characteristic of a thing; although perception is had only of things which consist of forms and their names, perception is prior to any 'thinking about' or 'pondering of' such things,
(4) Own-making (sankhāra): This is identification with the intent to create experience for the self by way of acts of thought, word, and deed and the resulting identified-with experience,
(5) Consciousness (viññāṇa): This is knowing that one knows. Conscious awareness. The word literally means re-knowing-knowing-knowledge, which reflects the reality.

such things he perceives for himself
as being changeable,
painful,
broken,
a boil,
a stab,
an abyss,
an affliction,
'other',
disintegrating,
empty,
not-self.

Here we have a simile of an archer who sets up a target (setting up the khandhas as the object of one's thinkiing and pondering) and conscientiously practices to shoot long distances (remembering what was done and said long ago), accurately, and in rapid succession (swift in intuition), and to pierce great masses (the great mass of blindness). There are those who by the use of a simile come to understanding. Others will need to be told that what is being said here is that once the method is understood, it must be put into practice over and over again until one has achieved mastery over it; thinking and pondering over all one is attached to in all the various ways such things can come up and what is necessary to know, see and understand in order to let go of attachment to them.

Thus he turns his heart away from such things.

He thus having turned his heart away from such things,
joins his heart to the state of the deathless
thinking:

"This is the peaceful,
this is the culmination,
that is to say:
the calming down of all own-making;
the laying down of all planning;
the destruction of hunger/thirst;
dispassion,
ending,
Nibbāna."

He, taking his stand on this
arives at the destruction of the corrupting influences.

There is a follow-up paragraph which states that should one fail at destruction of the corrupting influences using this method, one will nevertheless have created such momentum in practice that one will break the five yokes to rebirth in lower realms and will, upon departing this life without dying, be reborn in a higher realm without birth, spontaneously, and will make an end there. This, of course, if one has made good faith effort.

Edit [Saturday, February 23, 2019 8:10 AM]: There is in some cases of the description of the First Jhāna, an accompanying simile of a bath attendent or his apprentice taking soap-flakes, (at'za you mind, snow-flake), and in a copper bowl sprinkling them with water (understanding), working them round and round into a ball (repeated practice at bringing some coherance to your mind, in this case focusing on the thrill that accompanies appreciation of solitude), until that soap-ball (your body) is soaked, permeated, suffused and saturated with that thrill that accompanies the First Jhāna.

 


 

Oblog: [O.2.4.19] Monday, February 04, 2019 8:45 AM

[AN 9.16] Perceptions, the M. Olds translation.
Linked to the Pali, the Hare translation, the Bhikkhu Thanissaro translation and the Sister Upalavanna translation.
Nine perceptions which are of great fruit and of great profit.

Nine Profitable Perceptions

"There are these nine perceptions, beggars,
which, made a big thing of,
have great fruit
are of great advantage;
lead on to the deathless,
culminate in the deathless.

What nine?

1. Perception of the ugly

Bhikkhu Thanissaro would limit this to perception of the uglyness of body. Note this is 'perception' not 'thought of'. You really need to see the uglyness as uglyness. While this is the most important of the ways this perception can be used, it is not the only way. The idea is to break attachment by focusing on the unpleasant feature of a thing. It is especially useful when combating lust by focusing on the things in the lust-object which will drive you crazy the day after. Too fat, too thin, too tall, too short ...

2. perception of death,

This is the perception that one will die by way of seeing that death is bound up in existence; that once come to existence a thing will pass out of existence. Again, this is not a theoretical understanding, it is the perception of the fact. Look around, see if you can find an object that will not eventually cease to exist. Your perception of death is when you have given up trying to find such a thing.

3. perception of the revolting nature of food,

At root this is the perception that whatever it is that one eats, it involved the killing of some living being or many living beings.

4. perception of non-indulgence in all worlds,

This is seeing the uselessness of indulging in ambitions (however minor) in a world which is an ending thing. This must be a broad, sweeping perception that encompasses every sort and possibility of existing in any sort of world whatever. Focus on some form of existence ("I want to be a movie star") and then focus on all the disadvantages of that. The primary disadvantage being that one will have no time for Dhamma research and practice, but bring in all the other disadvantages you can imagine. Do this for any occupation in the world that tempts you.

5. perception of change,

Pay attention to the way things change. Again, not as a theoretical proposition, but as a perception of the reality. Think time-lapse photography. Begin by focusing on things where seeing the change is easy, such as with water, the weather, plant life; then broaden it out into percption of aging in your friends. Marvelous! It appears that I am the only one that does not change.

6. perception of pain in change,

This is where most people need to get real. It is painful when things do not go your way. It is more painful when they go your way for a time and then change direction. Somewhere in your history there is highly likely someone who has died whose death caused you pain. Focus on that and then generalize out. Inwardly one yearns for rest, stability. What we have in stead is like trying to keep balance on an avalanch. The stress is so constant that it has become like white noise; your job is to see through the block to the reality.

7. perception of not-self in the painful

This is essentially the perception that if a thing were one's own, it would be under one's control, would not cause us pain because we simply did not want to experience pain, and that 'this' is not under one's control and therefore must not be 'the self' of one should there be such a thing. Then of course there is the deduction that since all that which has come into existence will pass out of existence and because of that be painful, there is nothing there whatever that can rightfully be called the self. Then there is the need to restrain yourself from forming the opinion that there is no self.

8. perception of letting go,

Just giving up a bad habit is not going to bring you much closer to Nibbana. If you do not examine the situation, you will more than likely just pick up some new bad habit. What you must also do is to perceive the release of tension that follows letting go. Bring yourself to the perception that this thing that has been let go, if not taken up again, cannot in future cause you pain. That perceived is what will motivate you when some of the more difficult things to give up must be given up.

9. perception of dispassion

Again this is not the intellectual idea that by letting go of thirst one ends pain; it is the perception that when you have let go of any thirst, no pain could result from that.

 


 

Oblog: [O.2.3.19] Sunday, February 03, 2019 8:48 AM

In researching another topic I found the following which is Mrs. Rhys Davids discussion of the term 'Pīti' which I quote here in an effort to counter-act the tendency to define this term in only one way (as per Bhk. Thanissaro: 'rapture'). The reason for that being the dissonance between the ease of entering the first jhāna in all other respects versus the difficulty of that if Pīti is described as exclusively 'rapture.'

From: Dh.S.: A Buddhist Manual of Psychological Ethics, C.A.F. Rhys Davids, trans.: §7: "Pīti, as distinguished from sukhaɱ, is explicitly excluded from the skandha of feeling, considered as the irreducible hedonic constituent, and referred to the composite psychoses of the sankhāra skandha. It connotes emotion, as distinct from bare feeling; that is to say, pīti is a complex psychical phenomenon, implying a "central psycho-physical) origin" and a widely diffused "somatic resonance" (cf. Sully, The Human Mind, ii, 56). It arises out of a present idea, and suffuses the whole being. By Buddhaghosa's day it was divided into five species: the thrill of joy, just causing "the flesh to creep"; the flash of joy, like lightening; the flood of joy, like the breakers on a seashore; ecstasy or transport, in which the subject could float in the air; and overwhelming suffusing joy (Asl. 115, 116). Instances are related of the fourth species (ubbega-pīti), the inspiring idea being "Buddhārammaṇaɱ" (see also Visuddhi Magga, chap. iv; "Yogāvacara's Manual," vii; Bud. Psy., 1914, 187 f.) The same word (ubbego) is used to describe the anguish or trembling over guilt discovered."

Note the commentary classes Pīti not under vedana, but under sankhāra in the khandhas. In other words for the commentators pīti is self-made, intentionally created, not an externally stimulated thing. This much I agree with, but I would suggest that vedana too (as with all the khandhas) is sankhāra'd.

I do not disagree with Mrs. Rhys-Davids analysis, but think it is not sufficiently wide in scope. I am suggesting the term stands for the spectrum of phenomena that falls between appreciation and rapture.

Try thinking of the distinction as being between pleasure and the enjoyment of pleasure. The former is a sensation, the latter is a reaction to sensation. So what we have in the first jhāna is 'appreciation of the pleasures born of solitude,' rather than 'pleasure and enjoyment born of solitude'. The 'enjoyment' needs to be shown to be of the pleasure of solitude.

By the way this raises the issue of posture. It is very important to the arising of the more blissful states of Pīti that one is sitting or standing with one's spine in proper alignment. For tall people, the ability to sit up straight depends greatly on having good upper body strength and strong abdomnal muscles. Good posture used to be one of the things parents taught their children. Not so these days. So train yourselves starting as early as you can! Its important!

For more on Pīti, see AN 10.1 ff.

 


 

Oblog: [O.1.30.19] Wednesday, January 30, 2019 6:01 AM

Who the Potter, pray, and who the pot?
— Omar

A Doer of the Word, Chapter 2 of Twelve Men, by Theodore Dreiser, 1919.
An inspirational story about a Master Giver. It is a non-fiction interview. Although this is about a Christian who has made a vehicle of generosity, it is in no way in conflict with the ideas concerning generosity in the Buddha's system. It may, in these times, seem a bit sappy, but that is not really the case, Dreiser, as interviewer here is sufficiently skeptical. There are many tricks of giving revealed as well as some stories of magic power. Altogether anyone desiring to expand their hearts through generosity would do well to read this short chapter.
Theodore Dreiser was a little-known, but very influential American novelest writing at the end of the 19th century. He wrote on many levels, but the basic structure was to take the 'young pregnant unmarried mother evicted from her hovel in the depth of winter by the ruthless landlord who in frustrated lust and jealousy ties her up and puts her on the railroad tracks with a train on-coming' style and elevates it to fine art. Every scene in his writing is an examination of human nature.

 


 

Oblog: [O.1.27.19] Sunday, January 27, 2019 6:34 AM

[SN 5.46.8] Upavāṇa, the Bhikkhu Thanissaro translation.
Linked to the Pali, the Woodward translation, and the Bhk. Bodhi translation.
The Venerable Upavana explains how by developing the seven dimensions of awakening one can know a pleasant way of living (that is, Arahantship).

 


 

Oblog: [O.1.26.19] Saturday, January 26, 2019 8:24 AM

[DN 29] The Inspiring Discourse, The Bhikkhu Thanissaro, translation.
Linked to the Pali and the T.W. Rhys Davids translation.
Gotama responds to the news that the death of Nathaputta the Nigantha has resulted in the break-up and general disorder of his followers by outlining in great detail the solid foundation on which the Saŋgha has been constructed.
[AN 10.61] Ignorance, the Bhikkhu Thanissaro translation.
Linked to the Pali, the Woodward translation, and the Bhikkhu Bodhi translation.
In the technique of the Paticca Samuppada, the Buddha traces out how blindness rolls on and the way freedom from it is managed.
[SN 2.12.18] To Timbarukkha, the Bhikkhu Thanissaro translation.
Linked to the Pali, the C.A.F. Rhys Davids translation, and the Bhikkhu Bodhi translation.
Timbaruka asks the Buddha a series of questions about the source of pain and pleasure and to each of his questions receives the response, 'it is not such as that.' When Timbaruka asks for an explanation, The Buddha teaches him the 'Doctrine Going Down the Middle': that is, the Paticca Samuppada, the chain of interdependent factors giving rise to the experience of individualized existence and the resulting pain.
The question here is: Is sayaɱ kataɱ 'own-whatever-made' (Rhys Davids: 'wrought by one's self'; Bhk. Bodhi: 'created by oneself'; Bhk. Thanissaro: 'self-made') not just another form of sankhāra 'own-making'? Or the other way around, is not sankhāra just a contracted form of sayaɱ kataɱ?

 


 

Oblog: [O.1.25.19] Friday, January 25, 2019 5:17 AM

[AN 4.195] To Vappa, The Bhikkhu Thanissaro, translation.
Linked to the Pali and the Woodward translation.
A very important sutta! Especially for anyone near death concerned about past kamma cataching up. The Buddha describes how it is that by not doing unskillful deeds (i.e., making any new kamma, any own-making) with mind, speech or body no new consequences will be accumulated; in not doing new deeds, one is placed face-to-face with the results of old deeds and by intelligently resolving all such consequences as they come up one will have eliminated the possibility of painful kammic results coming to one in any future state. As I understand this the proposition is that practicing in this way the results of past deeds are forced to present themselves in this life in that they cannot flow into the future state of a being where no action creating a future identified-with state (own-making, kamma, of thought, word, or deed) exists.
[SNP 30] Sundarika Bhāradvāja, The Bhikkhu Thanissaro translation.
Linked to the Pali and the Fausbøll translation.
A brahman questions the Buddha to see if the latter deserves to receive the cake resulting from his sacrifice.
[MN 56] The Teaching to Upāli
Linked to the Pali, the Chalmers translation, the Sister Upalavanna translation, and the Horner translation.
A debate with the Buddha concerning the Jain proposition that of deeds of mind, word, and body, the deed of body carried the strongest kammic consequences where the Buddha holds that it is the deed of mind that carries the strongest kammic consequences.
[AN 10.72] Thorns, The Bhikkhu Thanissaro translation.
Linked to the Pali and the Woodward translation.
The Buddha teaches of ten things which are thorns to one who is actively practicing. Pay special attention to Bhk. Thanissaro's Footnote #3 which explains the common-sense way the idea of 'thorn' should be taken.

 


 

Oblog: [O.1.23.19] Wednesday, January 23, 2019 9:37 AM

Max Muller, Vanity Fair
1875 Vanity Fair caricature of Müller confirming that, at the age of fifty-one, with numerous honours, he was one of the truly notable "Men of the Day".

p.p. explains it all — p.p.

[dhp] The Dhammapada, A Collection of Verses, Being One of the Canonical Books of the Buddhists, translated by F. Max Max Müller, 1881
Reformatted from the version scanned and proofread by Christopher M. Weimer, Sacred Text Archives.
There is a very comprehensive (for the time) Introduction.
Chapters are linked-to from the Index;
individual verses are linked to the Pali; can be linked-to or located by appending '#v0' to the end of the url. E.g.: ~dhamma-vinaya/sbe/kd/dhp/kd.dhp.mulr.sbe.htm#v1
This is probably the most well-known and most-translated work of the Pali. This translation, one of the very first, has the advantage of being done by a non-Buddhist; it has the disadvantage of being done by a dyed-in-the-wool Sanskrit scholar.
I don't suppose that academics are actually any more arrogant than any other group of frightened people of limited scope (e.g., politicians, Englishmen), it is just that they have more exposure and are less fearful of their ignorance being exposed. So I suppose we should be grateful that Doc. Müller has graceously allowed that in some cases it may be reasonable for Pali scholars to use the Pali spelling of words in their works, and for that reason he has done so in this work. That said the reader of this translation will find the spelling of many Pali words in need of deciphering because the work was done prior to the establishment of any stable convention concerning diacriticals. I have inserted unicode diacriticals where it appeared harmless.

 


 

Oblog: [O.1.18.19] Friday, January 18, 2019 4:35 AM

Eight Accomplishments

Having enterprise
Being on-guard
Being friendly with the good
Living life on an even keel
Having gained faith
Being ethically conducted
Being generous
Having wisdom.

—AN 8.75
definitions are found onAN 8.76.

Eight That Advance One in Training

Taking no delight in activity;
Taking no delight in talking;
Taking no delight in sleep;
Taking no delight in groups;
Guarding the sense-forces;
Moderation in eating;
Taking no delight in contact;
Taking no delight in distraction.

—AN 8.75

 


 

Oblog: [O.1.13.19] Sunday, January 13, 2019 10:21 AM

[AN 8.63] A Condensed Dhamma Discourse, The M. Olds, translation.
Linked to the Pali, the Hare translation, and the Bhikkhu Thanissaro translation.
A bhikkhu asks for a lesson 'in brief' and gets a lesson in detail. A truly unique sutta which leads to arahantship by a complex mixing of the four brahma viharas, and samādhi practice in the context of satipatthana training. A good sutta to break up the rigid understanding of samādhi and satipaṭṭhana practice.
This is a very interesting sutta because it gives a step-by-step instruction in meditation practice. It is notable here that while the factors of jhāna are stated, they are all just classed under 'samādhi' ('serenity'; Hare, Bhk. Thanisaro, Bhk. Bodhi: 'concentration') and are not put in the usual 1-4 grouping and the term 'jhāna' is not mentioned. The method for transitioning out of vitakka and vicāra is inidicated here in a way that is only found in a few suttas: that is, by abandoning one, then the other. Also interesting in this sutta is the way serenity practice is combined with the satipaṭṭānās. Note that this instruction was intended to, and did, result by itself in the hearer, putting it into practice, becoming an arahant.

 

§

 

Aŋguttara Nikāya
VIII. Aṭṭhaka Nipāta
VII. Bhūmi-Cāla Vagga

Sutta 63

Sankhitta-Desita Suttaɱ

A Condensed Dhamma Discourse

Translated from the Pali

 


 

[1][pts][than] I HEAR TELL:

Once upon a time The Lucky Man, Sāvatthi Town revisiting.

There then a bhikkhu drew near the Lucky Man.

Having drawn near The Lucky Man,
and given salutation,
he took a seat to one side.

Seated to one side, then, this bhikkhu addressed The Lucky Man:

"It would be well for me, bhante,
if the Bhagavā would teach a condensed Dhamma,
such that having heard Bhagavā's Dhamma,
I could live alone,
apart,
careful,
ardent,
intent on striving."

[aside] "... and even so are there some confused persons
who neither come to my Dhamma talks,
nor think they should follow me."

"Let, bhante, Bhagavā teach a condensed Dhamma
teach, Well-gone, a condensed Dhamma!

It may be such that even I might come to understand
the goal spoken of by Bhagavā;
it may be such that even I might become one
to receive what the Bhagavā says."

 

§

 

2. "In that case then, bhikkhu, train yourself this way:

'Let my heart,
having become well-composed within,
be still,
and not give rise to bad, unskillful things
that, persisting, overwhelm the heart.'

This is how, bhikkhu, to train yourself.

 

§

 

3. When, bhikkhu, your heart,
having become well-composed within,
is still,
and does not give rise to bad, unskillful things
that, persisting, overwhelm the heart,
then, bhikkhu, you must train yourself thus:

'Let freedom of heart through friendliness be made-become,
made a big thing,
made a vehicle,
made a reality,
come to greatness,
well-set going.'

This is how, bhikkhu, to train yourself.

4. When, bhikkhu, this serene state
has been made become this way,
made a big thing,
proceed thus, bhikkhu, with this serenity:

'Become with thinking along with pondering.

Become without thinking, but with pondering.

Become completely without thinking, without pondering.

Become along with enthusiasm.

Become completely without enthusiasm.

Become accompanied just with the agreeable.

Become accompanied just with detachment.'

This is how, bhikkhu, to train yourself.

 

§

 

5. When, bhikkhu, this serene state
has been made become this way,
made a big thing,
proceed thus, bhikkhu, with this serenity:

'Let freedom of heart through sympathy be made-become,
made a big thing,
made a vehicle,
made a reality,
come to greatness,
well-set going.'

This is how, bhikkhu, to train yourself.

When, bhikkhu, this serene state
has been made become this way,
made a big thing,
proceed thus, bhikkhu, with this serenity:

'Become with thinking along with pondering.

Become without thinking, but with pondering.

Become completely without thinking, without pondering.

Become along with enthusiasm.

Become completely without enthusiasm.

Become accompanied just with the agreeable.

Become accompanied just with detachment.'

This is how, bhikkhu, to train yourself.

 

§

 

6. When, bhikkhu, this serene state
has been made become this way,
made a big thing,
proceed thus, bhikkhu, with this serenity:

'Let freedom of heart through empathy be made-become,
made a big thing,
made a vehicle,
made a reality,
come to greatness,
well-set going.'

This is how, bhikkhu, to train yourself.

When, bhikkhu, this serene state
has been made become this way,
made a big thing,
proceed thus, bhikkhu, with this serenity:

'Become with thinking along with pondering.

Become without thinking, but with pondering.

Become completely without thinking, without pondering.

Become along with enthusiasm.

Become completely without enthusiasm.

Become accompanied just with the agreeable.

Become accompanied just with detachment.'

This is how, bhikkhu, to train yourself.

 

§

 

7. When, bhikkhu, this serene state
has been made become this way,
made a big thing,
proceed thus, bhikkhu, with this serenity:

'Let freedom of heart through detachment be made-become,
made a big thing,
made a vehicle,
made a reality,
come to greatness,
well-set going.'

This is how, bhikkhu, to train yourself.

When, bhikkhu, this serene state
has been made become this way,
made a big thing,
proceed thus, bhikkhu, with this serenity:

'Become with thinking along with pondering.

Become without thinking, but with pondering.

Become completely without thinking, without pondering.

Become along with enthusiasm.

Become completely without enthusiasm.

Become accompanied just with the agreeable.

Become accompanied just with detachment.'

This is how, bhikkhu, to train yourself.

 

§

 

8. When, bhikkhu, this serene state
has been made become this way,
made a big thing,
proceed thus, bhikkhu, with this serenity:

'Living in a body,
I will oversee the body,
ardent, self-aware, minding,
having settled down worldly coveting and depression.'

This is how, bhikkhu, to train yourself.

When, bhikkhu, this serene state
has been made become this way,
made a big thing,
proceed thus, bhikkhu, with this serenity:

'Become with thinking along with pondering.

Become without thinking, but with pondering.

Become completely without thinking, without pondering.

Become along with enthusiasm.

Become completely without enthusiasm.

Become accompanied just with the agreeable.

Become accompanied just with detachment.'

This is how, bhikkhu, to train yourself.

 

§

 

9. When, bhikkhu, this serene state
has been made become this way,
made a big thing,
proceed thus, bhikkhu, with this serenity:

'Living in sense-experience,
I will oversee sense-experience,
ardent, self-aware, minding,
having settled down worldly coveting and depression.'

This is how, bhikkhu, to train yourself.

When, bhikkhu, this serene state
has been made become this way,
made a big thing,
proceed thus, bhikkhu, with this serenity:

'Become with thinking along with pondering.

Become without thinking, but with pondering.

Become completely without thinking, without pondering.

Become along with enthusiasm.

Become completely without enthusiasm.

Become accompanied just with the agreeable.

Become accompanied just with detachment.'

This is how, bhikkhu, to train yourself.

 

§

 

10. When, bhikkhu, this serene state
has been made become this way,
made a big thing,
proceed thus, bhikkhu, with this serenity:

'Living in mental states,
I will oversee mental states,
ardent, self-aware, minding,
having settled down worldly coveting and depression.'

This is how, bhikkhu, to train yourself.

When, bhikkhu, this serene state
has been made become this way,
made a big thing,
proceed thus, bhikkhu, with this serenity:

'Become with thinking along with pondering.

Become without thinking, but with pondering.

Become completely without thinking, without pondering.

Become along with enthusiasm.

Become completely without enthusiasm.

Become accompanied just with the agreeable.

Become accompanied just with detachment.'

This is how, bhikkhu, to train yourself.

 

§

 

11. When, bhikkhu, this serene state
has been made become this way,
made a big thing,
proceed thus, bhikkhu, with this serenity:

'Living in the Dhamma,
I will oversee things,
ardent, self-aware, minding,
having settled down worldly coveting and depression.'

This is how, bhikkhu, to train yourself.

When, bhikkhu, this serene state
has been made become this way,
made a big thing,
proceed thus, bhikkhu, with this serenity:

'Become with thinking along with pondering.

Become without thinking, but with pondering.

Become completely without thinking, without pondering.

Become along with enthusiasm.

Become completely without enthusiasm.

Become accompanied just with the agreeable.

Become accompanied just with detachment.'

This is how, bhikkhu, to train yourself.

 

§

 

12. When, bhikkhu, this serene state
has been made become well developed this way,
proceeding thus, bhikkhu —

-◦-

approaching, whatever is thus approached,
is approached in comfort;

-◦-

whenever, however, standing,
the standing is comfortable,

-◦-

whenever, however seated,
the seat is comfortable,

-◦-

whenever, however the place for lying down be made,
the place for lying down that is made is comfortable.

 

§

 

13. There then, this bhikkhu,
having been so instructed with this instruction,
living alone,
apart,
careful,
ardent,
intent on striving
in no long time
clearly understood, incorporated, and achieved that goal
that un-surpassable living of the godly life
for which sons of good families
leave home for homelessness
seeing it for himself in this visible thing.

And he knew:

"Left behind is re-birth;
lived is the godly life,
done is duty's doing,
no further is there it'n-n-at'n."

And this bhikkhu became another of the Arahants.

 


 

Oblog: [O.1.9.19] Wednesday, January 09, 2019 8:07 AM

[AN 8.56] Fear, A Name for Sensuality, The M. Olds translation.
Linked to the Pali and the Hare translation.
Eight terms that should be considered synonyms for sense pleasures: 'fear', 'pain', 'disease', 'inflammation', 'hook', 'bondage', 'swamp', and 'in-wombed'.

 


 

Aŋguttara Nikāya
VIII. Aṭṭhaka Nipāta
VI. Gotamī Vagga aka Sa-ādhāna-Vagga

Sutta 56

Bhaya Suttaɱ

Fear, A Name for Sensuality

Translated from the Pali

 


 

[1][pts] I HEAR TELL:

Once upon a time The Lucky Man, Sāvatthi Town revisiting.

There, to the Beggars gathered round he said:

"Beggars!"

And the beggars responding, "Bhante!" the Lucky Man said this:

2. "'Fear', beggars, is a deeper way of speaking of sensuality;
'pain', beggars, is a deeper way of speaking of sensuality;
'sickness', beggars, is a deeper way of speaking of sensuality;
'a cancer', beggars, is a deeper way of speaking of sensuality;
'a stabbing', beggars, is a deeper way of speaking of sensuality;
'relations', beggars, is a deeper way of speaking of sensuality;
'a mire', beggars, is a deeper way of speaking of sensuality;
'a womb', beggars, is a deeper way of speaking of sensuality.

 

§

 

3. And why, beggars, is 'fear' a deeper way of speaking of sensuality?

Whoever is empassioned by lust for sensuality,
bound by lustful wishing,
is not even released from fear in this visible thing,
is certainly not released from fear in his future states.

Therefore is 'fear' a deeper way of speaking of sensuality.

3. And why, beggars, is 'pain' a deeper way of speaking of sensuality?

Whoever is empassioned by lust for sensuality,
bound by lustful wishing,
is not even released from pain in this visible thing,
is certainly not released from pain in his future states.

Therefore is 'pain' a deeper way of speaking of sensuality.

3. And why, beggars, is 'sickness' a deeper way of speaking of sensuality?

Whoever is empassioned by lust for sensuality,
bound by lustful wishing,
is not even released from sickness in this visible thing,
is certainly not released from sickness in his future states.

Therefore is 'sickness' a deeper way of speaking of sensuality.

3. And why, beggars, is 'a cancer' a deeper way of speaking of sensuality?

Whoever is empassioned by lust for sensuality,
bound by lustful wishing,
is not even released from cancer in this visible thing,
is certainly not released cancer in his future states.

Therefore is 'a cancer' a deeper way of speaking of sensuality.

3. And why, beggars, is 'a stab' a deeper way of speaking of sensuality?

Whoever is empassioned by lust for sensuality,
bound by lustful wishing,
is not even released from being stabbed in this visible thing,
is certainly not released from being stabbed in his future states.

Therefore is 'a stab' a deeper way of speaking of sensuality.

3. And why, beggars, is 'relations' a deeper way of speaking of sensuality?

Whoever is empassioned by lust for sensuality,
bound by lustful wishing,
is not even released from relations in this visible thing,
is certainly not released from relations in his future states.

Therefore is 'relations' a deeper way of speaking of sensuality.

3. And why, beggars, is 'the mire' a deeper way of speaking of sensuality?

Whoever is empassioned by lust for sensuality,
bound by lustful wishing,
is not even released from the mire in this visible thing,
is certainly not released from the mire in his future states.

Therefore is 'the mire' a deeper way of speaking of sensuality.

3. And why, beggars, is 'the womb' a deeper way of speaking of sensuality?

Whoever is empassioned by lust for sensuality,
bound by lustful wishing,
is not even released from the womb in this visible thing,
is certainly not released from the womb in his future states.

Therefore is 'the womb' a deeper way of speaking of sensuality."

 


 

Fear, pain, sickness,
and a cancer,
relations, a mire and a womb — each
'sensuality' are called —
as common people
beset by forms delightful,
further wombs beget.

But when a beggar, ardent,
self-awareness not neglecting,
this painful mired-path surpasses,
a people quaking at birth and aging
is what he sees there.

 


 

Oblog: [O.1.5.19] Saturday, January 05, 2019 5:29 AM

 

Deeper than
the deep blue sea
is seeing
deeper
than
the Seen.

Mettā

"I do not understand your enjoyments, people,
but I wish you great happiness
in the enjoyment of them.

Forgiveness

This is a very difficult thing, this business of living.
There is scope enough between the depths of misery,
and the bliss of life above,
to quench the anger
of almost anyone
over almost anything.

 


 

Oblog: [O.1.1.19] Monday, January 1, 2019 12:01 AM

 

Selected Translation Terms
from Dr. Rupert Gethin's
Sayings of the Buddha, Oxford University Press, 2008

Abhiññā direct knowledge
Appamāda attentiveness
Āsava taints
Attan self
Bala powers
Bhikkhu monk
Bodhi awakening
Citta mind
Dhamma Truth, practice, qualities, teaching
Diṭṭhi view
Domanassa unhappyness
Dukkha suffering
Indriya faculties, senses
Jhāna absorption
Kamma action
Khandha aggregates
Kāma sense desire
Manasikāra attention
Metta friendliness
Nibbidā disenchantment
Nirodha cessation
Nīvaraṇa hindrances
Padhāna application
Passaddhi tranquillity
Paññā wisdom
Paṭicca samuppāda dependent arising
Rūpa form
Sacca truth
Samatha calm
Sampajaññā awareness
Samādhi concentration
Sankhāra forces, volitional conditions
Sati mindfulness
Saññā conceiving
Saɱyojana fetters
Sila moral behavior
Taṇhā craving
Upekkhā equanimity
Vedana feelings
Vicara examining
Vipassana insight
Viriya energy
Virāga dispassion
Vitakka thinking
Viññaṇā consciousness
First Jhāna Completely secluded from sense desirs and unwholesome qualities, he lives having attained the joy and happiness of the first absorption, which is accompanied by thinking and examining, and born of seclusion.
Second Jhāna by stilling thinking and examining, a monk lives having attained the joy and happiness of the second absorption, a state of inner clarity and mental unification that is without thinking and examining, and is born of concentration.
Third Jhāna by having no desire for joy a monk lives equanimously, mindful and fully aware; he experiences the bodily happiness of which the noble ones speak saying "equanimous and mindful, one lives happily", and so lives having attained the third absorption
Fourth Jhāna by letting go of happiness and unhappiness, as a result of the earlier dispappearance of pleasure and pain, a monk lives having attained the pure equanimity and mindfulness of the fourth absorption, which is free of happiness and unhappiness.

These tables will be permanently available from a file linked to on the Glossology contents page.

 


 

Oblog: [O.1.1.19.1] Monday, January 1, 2019 12:01 AM

 

Aŋguttara Nikāya
VIII. Aṭṭhaka Nipāta
IV. Dāna Vagga

Sutta 40

Apāya-Saŋvattanika Suttaɱ

Landing One's Self in the Pay-up

Translated from the Pali

 


 

[AN 8.40][1][pts][than][bodh] I HEAR TELL:

Once upon a time The Lucky Man, Bhaggaland, Crocodile Hill, Bhesakala Forest Deer Park revisiting.

1. The destruction of life, beggars, practiced,
developed,
made a big thing of,
lands one's self in hell,
lands one's self in the womb of anmals,
lands one's self in the garb of ghosts.

What is an altogether trivial result
of the destruction of life
for a being that is human
is having landed one's self a short life.

2. Taking the ungiven beggars, practiced,
developed,
made a big thing of,
lands one's self in hell,
lands one's self in the womb of anmals,
lands one's self in the garb of ghosts.

What is an altogether trivial result
of taking the ungiven
for a being that is human
is having landed one's self bad luck with money.

3. Misbehavior in lusts beggars, practiced,
developed,
made a big thing of,
lands one's self in hell,
lands one's self in the womb of anmals,
lands one's self in the garb of ghosts.

What is an altogether trivial result
of misbehavior in lusts
for a being that is human
is having landed one's self hatred and emnity.

4. Deceptive speach beggars, practiced,
developed,
made a big thing of,
lands one's self in hell,
lands one's self in the womb of anmals,
lands one's self in the garb of ghosts.

What is an altogether trivial result
of deceptive speach
for a being that is human
is having landed one's self untrue information.

5. Malicious gossip beggars, practiced,
developed,
made a big thing of,
lands one's self in hell,
lands one's self in the womb of anmals,
lands one's self in the garb of ghosts.

What is an altogether trivial result
of malicious gossip
for a being that is human
is having landed one's self frienship-breaking emnity.

6. Cutting speach beggars, practiced,
developed,
made a big thing of,
lands one's self in hell,
lands one's self in the womb of anmals,
lands one's self in the garb of ghosts.

What is an altogether trivial result
of cutting speach
for a being that is human
is having landed one's self unpleasant words.

7. Idle lip-flapping beggars, practiced,
developed,
made a big thing of,
lands one's self in hell,
lands one's self in the womb of anmals,
lands one's self in the garb of ghosts.

What is an altogether trivial result
of idle lip-flapping
for a being that is human
is having landed one's self mindless yacking.

8. Drinking alcoholic drinks beggars, practiced,
developed,
made a big thing of,
lands one's self in hell,
lands one's self in the womb of anmals,
lands one's self in the garb of ghosts.

What is an altogether trivial result
of drinking alcoholic drinks
for a being that is human
is having landed one's self in madness.

 


 

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