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 [Dittha-Dhamma Loka-Dhamma]


 

Welcome Friend!

2020

newWhat's New?

The content of this site is available in two locations:
buddhadust.net and obo.genaud.net


Download the Latest Zip Version of the Site:
http://obo.genaud.net/resources/download/bulk.htm
or clone the git repo;
https://github.com/alexgenaud/buddhadust


Individual articles on this page can be linked-to by appending '#' sign plus the abridged form of the entry date [e.g. #O.2.21.19]
to the end of the url in the address bar.
For example: ~/dhammatalk/dhammatalk_forum/whats.new.htm#O.2.21.19

 


 

Oblog: [O.1.18.20] Saturday, January 18, 2020 9:35 AM

"Whoso stoppeth his ears at the cry of the poor,
he also shall cry himself, but shall not be heard."

Proverbs 21:13, K.J.V. Relative to DN 5 - R.D., note 7

 


 

Oblog: [O.1.12.20] Sunday, January 12, 2020 6:48 AM

All the world’s a stage,
And all the men and women merely players;
They have their exits and their entrances,
And one man in his time plays many parts,
His acts being seven ages. At first the infant,
Mewling and puking in the nurse’s arms;
And then the whining schoolboy, with his satchel
And shining morning face, creeping like snail
Unwillingly to school. And then the lover,
Sighing like furnace, with a woeful ballad
Made to his mistress’ eyebrow. Then a soldier,
Full of strange oaths, and bearded like the pard,
Jealous in honor, sudden and quick in quarrel,
Seeking the bubble reputation
Even in the cannon’s mouth. And then the justice,
In fair round belly with good capon lined,
With eyes severe and beard of formal cut,
Full of wise saws and modern instances;
And so he plays his part. The sixth age shifts
Into the lean and slippered pantaloon,
With spectacles on nose and pouch on side;
His youthful hose, well saved, a world too wide
For his shrunk shank; and his big manly voice,
Turning again toward childish treble, pipes
And whistles in his sound. Last scene of all,
That ends this strange eventful history,
Is second childishness and mere oblivion,
Sans teeth, sans eyes, sans taste, sans everything.

—Jaques in Shakespeare's As You Like It, Act II, vii; The Complete Works of William Shakespeare, The Cambridge Edition Text, as edited by William Aldis Wright, Including the Temple Notes, Illustrated by Rockwell Kent, Doubleday, Doran & Company, Inc, Garden City and New York, 1936.

 


 

Possible translation for Āsava? = Miasma

 


 

Oblog: [O.1.7.20] Tuesday, January 07, 2020 7:09 AM

[SN 5.55.55] Four Fruitful Things: Stream-Winning The M. Olds translation.
Linked to the Pali and the Woodward translation.
[SN 5.55.56] Four Fruitful Things: Once-Returning The M. Olds translation.
Linked to the Pali and the Woodward translation.
[SN 5.55.57] Four Fruitful Things: Non-Returning The M. Olds translation.
Linked to the Pali and the Woodward translation.
[SN 5.55.58] Four Fruitful Things: Arahantship The M. Olds translation.
Linked to the Pali and the Woodward translation.
[SN 5.55.59] Four Fruitful Things: Gaining Wisdom The M. Olds translation.
Linked to the Pali and the Woodward translation.
[SN 5.55.60] Four Fruitful Things: Having Sown Wisdom The M. Olds translation.
Linked to the Pali and the Woodward translation.
[SN 5.55.61] Four Fruitful Things: Bountiful Wisdom The M. Olds translation.
Linked to the Pali and the Woodward translation.

In addition to these, there are 13 others (translated by Woodward who translates 'pañña' as 'insight' - 'wisdom' was more generally acknowledge a better translation at a later point): Comprehensive wisdom; Manifold wisdom; Extensive wisdom; Profound wisdom; Unbounded wisdom; Abundant wisdom; Many-sided wisdom; Swift wisdom; Buoyant wisdom; Joyous wisdom; Instant wisdom; Sharp wisdom; Fastidious wisdom.

The Four Things in All Cases:

[1] Association with good men
[2] Hearing True Dhamma
[3] Tracing things to their point of origin,
[4] Conducting one's self in accodance with the Lessons in the Teachings.

 


 

Oblog: [O.1.4.20] Saturday, January 04, 2020 5:55 AM

OK. But for the rule beyond price use:

"Let me abstain
from doing
to others
what me
wouldna
have others
do unto me."

p.p. explains it all — p.p.

Do Unto Others as Ye Would Be Done By
Do unto others as you would have them do unto you.

—The Golden Rule

A Profitable Lesson in Dhamma

Here the student of the Aristocrat ponders:

"Here am I,
fond of my life,
not wanting to die,
fond of pleasure
and averse from pain.

Suppose someone should rob me of my life,
it would not be a thing
pleasing or delightful to me.

If I, in my turn,
should rob of his life
one fond of his life,
not wanting to die,
one fond of pleasure
and averse from pain,
it would not be a thing
pleasing or delightful to him.

For a state that is not pleasant or delightful to me
must be so to him also:
and a state that is not pleasing or delightful to me, -
how could I inflict that upon another?

As a result of such reflection
he himself abstains
from taking the life of creatures
and he encourages others so to abstain,
and speaks in praise of so abstaining.

If someone should take
with thievish intent
what I have not given him,

If someone should have intercourse with my wives,

If someone should spoil my fortune
by lying speech,

If someone should estrange me from my friends by slander,

If someone should treat me with harsh speech

If someone should treat me with pointless, frivolous talk,
it would not be a thing pleasant or delightful to me.

If I in my turn should so treat him,
it would not be pleasant or delightful to him.

For a state that is unpleasant,
not delightful to me
must be so to him also,
and a state that is not pleasant,
not delightful to me, -
how could I inflict that upon another?

—Adapted from Woodward's translation of SN 5.55.7.

The Mirror of Dhamma

This the 'Mirror of Dhamma,'
possessed of which the student of the Aristocrat,
if he please, may himself proclaim of himself:

"Cut off for me is rebirth in Hell,
cut off is rebirth in an animal womb,
cut off is the realm of ghosts,
the Woeful Way and the Downfall
Stream-winner am I
one bound for Awakening!"

Here the student of the Aristocrat has unwavering faith in the Buddha,
thus:

'He is the Lucky Man,
Arahant,
#1 Self-Awakened One,
perfect in knowledge and practice,
a Happy One,
world-knower,
unsurpassed charioteer
of men to be tamed,
teacher of devas and mankind,
a Buddha,
an Exalted One.'

He has unwavering faith in the Dhamma:

'Well taught by the Lucky Man
is the Dhamma,
to be seen in this visible state,
a thing not involving time,
a 'come see' thing,
leading onward,
to be known for themselves
by the wise.'

He has unwavering faith in the Order:

'Walking the walk is the Lucky Man's Order,
walking rightly,
walking according to the method,
walking consummately
is the Exalted One's Order of Disciples:
namely,
the four pairs of men,
the eight sorts of men.

That is the Exalted One's Order of Disciples.

Worthy of honour are they,
worthy of reverence,
worthy of offerings,
worthy of salutations with clasped hands, -
a field of merit unsurpassed for the world.'

And he has the virtues
dear to the Aristocrat,
virtues unbroken,
whole,
unspotted,
untarnished,
giving freedom,
praised by the wise:
virtues untainted,
which lead to serenity.'

This is that
'Mirror of the Dhamma,'
possessed of which the student of the Aristocrat,
if he please, may himself proclaim of himself:

"Cut off for me is rebirth in Hell,
cut off is rebirth in an animal womb,
cut off is the realm of ghosts,
the Woeful Way and the Downfall
Stream-winner am I
one bound for Awakening!"

—Adapted from Woodward's translation of SN 5.55.8.

 


 

Oblog: [O.1.3.20] Friday, January 03, 2020 6:31 AM

Tip: When working on letting go relative to the body, remember that the job is not to relax, but to let go of tensions. Tension is a muscle contraction which has past its point of usefulness. You want to let go of all tensions; if you tried to relax all flexed muscles in the body (which is impossible), you would end up like a plate of spaghetti. The danger here is that you can spend considerable time relaxing this muscle, then that, only after a time noticing that you have been going round and round in a circle, not relieving tensions at all.

Tip: If you are going to use the Dhamma to inform your practice (as opposed to simply following some teacher's guidance), then it becomes very helpful to do your own translations. This does not have to be polished work. The point is the bearing down on, concentration on the Dhamma (the lesson) within the Dhamma (the instruction). You may not be aware of it, but things change extremely rapidly in our world today and our minds have (or are attempting to) adopt by speeding up and cutting corners, especially when we read. In this is the danger of mentally editing what you are reading such as to form an impression of the lesson which agrees with your pre-conceived notions. If your pre-conceived notions were worth their salt, you would not be in the mess you are in. So you need to open yourself to the possibility that you may have to think through a statement that contradicts a long-cherished belief. That opening to the possibility of new understanding is greatly facilitated by the pondering one must do in translation.

 


 

Oblog: [O.1.1.20] Wednesday, January 01, 2020 5:18 AM

DN cover image MN cover image AN cover image SN cover image

E-Book Editions
of the Pali Text Society Translations
of
The Four Nikāyas
E-pub, Azw, Mobi, and PDF formats

Free downloads of the PTS translations of the Four Nikāyas have just been announced by Bhante Bhikkhu Subhuti on his website: americanmonk.org

Please note that this is not a project of BuddhaDust and these publications are not being hosted on this site. These books have been compiled and re-formatted from our as yet [Monday, December 30, 2019 8:15 AM] incompletely proofed html source files by Bhante Bhikkhu Subhuti and Stephen J. Torrence. Some additional editing for spelling has been done by them. Although there remain errors related to the Optical Character Recognition (OCR) of the original scanned books as well as errors made by me in the haste to get 'something' on line, it was felt by Bhante Subhuti that these files were good enough for release in their current state. There are plans to periodically update these books as editing of the source files continues.

Meanwhile this will be, for many people, a more convenient and pleasurable way to read the suttas.

To insure that you are downloading the latest version, please downlad from americanmonk.org

I see the release of these e-books, however much they can be improved, as a small miracle. The Dhamma as propagated itself! This is exactly what I would have hoped would happen with the digitization of these suttas. Here is a quick list of some other projects people might find interesting to compile into e-book formats:

Healthcare and the Medical Professions;
Politics;
Managing Business and Money Management;
The story of Rahula;
The story of Migara's Mother;
The story of Angulimala;
The story of King Pasanadi;
The story of Gotama through the suttas;
The important topics of the Samyutta Nikaya could be made into separate books including suttas on the same subject from all the other Nikayas.
a collection of all the similes plus their explanations;
a listing/index (linked), in chronological order, of all the suttas (I believe this information can be gathered from the commentaries),
and whatever other subjects that are of interest to narow groups.

 


 

Welcome Friend!
CONTINUED: The listings for:

What's New? 2019What's New? 2018What's New? 2017What's New? 2016
What's New? 2015What's New? 2014What's New? 2010-2013

 



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