Majjhima Nikaya


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Majjhima Nikāya
II. Majjhima-Paṇṇāsa
2. Bhikkhu Vagga

The Middle Length Sayings
II. The Middle Fifty Discourses
2. The Division on Monks

Sutta 66

Laṭukikopama Suttaɱ

Discourse on the Simile of the Quail

Translated from the Pali by I.B. Horner, M.A.
Associate of Newham College, Cambridge
First Published in 1954

Copyright The Pali Text Society
Commercial Rights Reserved
Creative Commons Licence
For details see Terms of Use.

 


 

[1][chlm][than][upal] THUS have I heard:

At one time the Lord was staying near Aŋguttarāpa.

Āpaṇa[1] was the name of a market town in Aŋguttarāpa.

Then the Lord, having dressed in the morning,
taking his bowl and robe,
entered Āpaṇa for almsfood.

When he had walked for alms-food
and was returning from the almsgathering after the meal,
he approached a forest-thicket
for the day-sojourn.

When he had plunged into that forest-thicket,
he sat down at the root of a tree
for the day-sojoum.

And the venerable Uāyin also,
having dressed in the morning,
and taking his bowl and robe,
entered Āpaṇa for almsfood.

When he had walked for almsfood
and was returning from the almsgathering after the meal,
he approached that same forest-thicket
for the day-sojourn.

When he had plunged into that forest-thicket,
he sat down at the root of a tree
for the day-sojourn.

Then while the venerable Uāyin was in private seclusion
a reasoning arose in his mind thus:

[120] "Indeed our Lord is a remover
of many painful things,
indeed our Lord is a bringer
of many pleasant things,
indeed our Lord is a remover
of many unskilled things,
indeed our Lord is a bringer
of many skilled thinga."[2]

Then the venerable Uāyin,
emerging from his seclusion towards evening,
approached the Lord;
having approached,
having greeted the Lord,
he sat down at a respectful distance.

As he was sitting down at a respectful distance,
the venerable Udayin spoke thus to the Lord:

"While I, revered sir, was in private seclusion,
a reasoning arose in my mind thus:

'Indeed our Lord is a remover
of many painful things,
indeed our Lord is a bringer
of many pleasant things,
indeed our Lord is a remover
of many unskilled things,
indeed our Lord is a bringer
of many skilled thinga.'

We, revered sir, used to eat in the evening
and in the morning
and during the day -
at a wrong time.[3]

Revered sir, the Lord at that time
addressed the monks, saying:

'Please do you, monks,
give up eating at this wrong time,
during the day.'

I was depressed because of this, revered sir,
I was sorry,
and thought:

'The Lord speaks of our giving up
that sumptuous food,
solid and soft,
which the believing householders give us
during the day -
at the wrong time,
and the Well-farer speaks of our rejecting it.'

Those of us, revered sir,
who look to the Lord with regard
and respect
and modesty
and fear of blame,
gave up such food as this
(given) during the day,
at the wrong time.

Then we, revered sir,
used to eat in the evening
as well as in the morning.

It was at this time
that the Lord addressed the monks,
saying:

'Please do you, monks, give up
eating at this wrong time,
during the night.'

I was depressed because of this, revered sir,
I was sorry,
and thought:

'The Lord speaks of our giving up
that which is reckoned as the more sumptuous
of these two meals,
and the Well-farer speaks of our rejecting it.'

Once upon a time, revered sir,
a certain man,
having obtained some curry during the day,
spoke thus:

'Come, let us put this aside,
and in the evening
we will enjoy it all together.'

All cooking, revered sir, is at night,
there is little during the day.

But those of us, revered sir,
who look to the Lord with regard
and respect
and modesty
and fear of blame,
gave up such food as this
(given) at night,
at the wrong time.

Once upon a time, revered sir,
when the monks were walking for almsfood
in the dense darkness of the night,[4]
they would walk into a pool
at the entrance to a village,
and they would fall into the dirty pool
near [121] the village,
and they would blunder into a thorny hedge,
and they would blunder into a sleeping cow,
and they would meet with young men,[5]
both those who had committed a crime
and those who had not,
and women would solicit them[6]
against true dhamma.

Once upon a time I, revered sir,
used to walk for almsfood
in the dense darkness of the night,
and a certain woman saw me during a lightning flash
as she was washing a bowl,[7]
and terrified at seeing me,
she uttered a scream of horror:

'How terrible for me,
indeed there is a demon after me.'[8]

This said,
I, revered sir, said to this woman:

'Sister, I am not a demon,
I am a monk standing for almsfood.'

She said,

'The monk's father must be dead,
the monk's mother must be dead[9] -
it were better for you, monk,
to have your belly cut out
with a sharp butcher's knife
than to walk for almsfood
for the sake of your belly
in the dense darkness of the night.'

When I remember this, revered sir,
it occurs to me:

'Indeed our Lord is a remover
of many painful things,
indeed our Lord is a bringer
of many pleasant things,
indeed our Lord is a remover
of many unskilled things,
indeed our Lord is a bringer
of many skilled thinga.'

"But even so, Uāyin,
some foohsh persons here,
on being told by me:

'Give this up,'

speak thus:

'But what of this trifling insignificant matter?

This recluse lays too much emphasis on (exertion).'[10]

But they do not give it up
and they cause dissatisfaction
to be nursed against me
and against those monks who desire the training.

This[11] becomes for them,[12] Uāyin,
a strong bond,
a stout bond,
a solid bond,
a bond that does not rot away,
a thick log of wood.[13]

Uāyin, as a quail,
a little hen bird,[14]
because she is caught in a trap of creepers,
comes[15] to slaughter there
or to captivity
or dying;
so that, Uāyin, if any one should say:

'That quail,
a little hen bird,
because she is caught in a trap of creepers
comes to slaughter there
or to captivity,
or dying,
yet for her it is a bond of no strength,
[122] a weak bond,
a bond that rots away,
a pithless bond' -
would anyone speaking thus, Uāyin,
be speaking rightly?"

"No, revered sir.

That quail,
a little hen bird, revered sir,
because she is caught in a trap of creepers,
comes to slaughter there
or to captivity,
or dying,
since for her it is a strong bond,
a stout bond,
a solid bond,
a bond that does not rot away,
a thick log of wood."

"Even so, Uāyin,
some foolish persons here,
on being told by me,

'Give this up,'

speak thus:

'But what of this trifling insignificant matter!

This recluse lays too much emphasis on (exertion),'

and they do not give it up
and they cause dissatisfaction
to be nursed against me
and against those monks who desire the training.

This is for them, Uāyin,
a strong bond,
a stout bond,
a solid bond,
a bond that does not rot away,
a thick log of wood.

But, Uāyin,
some young men of family here,
on being told by me,

'Give this up,'

speak thus:

'But what of this trifling insignificant matter to be given up
and of whose giving up
the Lord speaks to us,
and of whose rejection
the Well-farer speaks to us?'

And they give it up
and they do not cause dissatisfaction
to be nursed against me
or against those monks who desire the training.

These, giving that up,
are unconcerned,
unruffled,
dependent on others,
with a mind become as a wild creature's.[16]

This for them, Uāyin,
is a bond of no strength,
a weak bond,
a bond that rots away,
a pithless bond.

Uāyin, it is like[17] a king's bull-elephant
whose tusks are as long as a plough-pole,
who is massive,
finely bred,
whose home is the battle-field
and who, if bound with a stout leather bond,[18]
having easily twisted his body,
having burst those bonds
tearing them asunder,
goes away as he pleases.

Now, Uāyin, if anyone should speak thus:

'That king's bull-elephant
whose tusks are as long as a plough-pole,
who is massive,
finely bred,
whose home is the battle-field
and who, if bound with a stout leather bond,
having easily twisted his body,
having burst those bonds
tearing them asunder,
goes away as he pleases;
yet for him it was a strong bond,
a stout bond,
a solid bond,
a bond that does not rot away,
a thick log of wood' -
would anyone speaking thus, Uāyin,
be speaking rightly?"

"No, revered sir.

That king's bull-elephant, revered sir
whose tusks are as long as a plough-pole,
who is massive,
finely bred,
whose home is the battle-field
and who, if bound with a stout leather bond,
having easily twisted his body,
having burst those bonds
tearing them asunder,
goes away as he pleases;
because for [123] him it is a bond of no strength,
a weak bond,
a bond that rots away,
a pithless bond."

"Even so, Uāyin,
some young men of family here,
on being told by me,

'Give this up,'
speak thus:

'But what of this trifling insignificant matter to be given up
and of whose giving up
the Lord speaks to us
and of whose rejection
the Well-farer speaks to us?"

And they give it up
and they do not cause dissatisfaction
to be nursed against me
or against those monks who desire the training.

These, giving that up,
are unconcerned,
unruffled,
dependent on others,
with a mind become as a wild creature's.

This for them, Uāyin,
is a weak bond,
a bond of no strength,
a bond that rots away,
a pithless bond.

And, Uāyin,
it is like a man,
poor,
needy,
destitute,[19]
who has one little tumbledown[20] hovel,[21]
open to the crows,
unlovely to see,
one tumbledown pallet,
unlovely to see,
his grain and store-room in one jar,
unlovely to see,
his one wife
unlovely to see.

He might see a monk in a monastery,
his hands and feet properly washed,
who, after eating a delicious meal,
was sitting in the cool shade
intent on the higher thought.

It might occur to him:

'Indeed, recluseship is pleasant,
indeed recluseship is healthy.

Suppose that I,
having cut off my hair and beard,
having donned saffron robes,
should go forth from home into homelessness?'

But he might not be able
to bring himself to give up
his one little tumbledown hovel
open to the crows,
unlovely to see,
one tumbledown pallet,
unlovely to see,
his grain and store-room in one jar,
unlovely to see,
his one wife
unlovely to see,
and to go forth from home
into homelessness,
having cut off his hair and beard
and having donned saffron robes.

Now, Uāyin,
if anyone should speak thus:

'That man, bound by those bonds
is unable,
giving up his one little tumbledown hovel
his one little tumbledown hovel
open to the crows,
unlovely to see,
one tumbledown pallet,
unlovely to see,
his grain and store-room in one jar,
unlovely to see,
his one wife
unlovely to see,
to go forth from home into homelessness,
having cut off his hair and beard
and having donned saffron robes,
because for him
it is a bond of no strength,
a weak bond,
a bond that rots away,
a pithless bond -
would anyone speaking thus, Uāyin,
be speaking rightly?"

"No, revered sir.

That man,
bound by those bonds,
is not able to give up
his one little tumbledown hovel
open to the crows,
unlovely to see,
one tumbledown pallet,
unlovely to see,
his grain and store-room in one jar,
unlovely to see,
his one wife
unlovely to see,
to go forth from home into homelessness,
having cut off his hair and beard
and having donned saffron robes,
because for him it is a strong bond,
a stout bond,
a solid bond,
a bond that does not rot away,
a thick log of wood."

"Even so, Uāyin,
some foolish persons here,
on being told by me,
[124] 'Give this up,'

speak thus:

'But what of this trifling insignificant matter?

This recluse lays too much emphasis on (exertion).'

And they do not give it up
and they cause dissatisfaction
to be nursed against me
and against those monks who desire the training.

This is for them, Uāyin,
a strong bond,
a stout bond,
a solid bond,
a bond that does not rot away,
a thick log of wood.

"And, Uāyin,
it is like a householder
or his son,
rich,
of great wealth,
of great possessions,
with a mass of abundant gold ornaments,[22]
a mass of abundant corn,
a mass of abundant fields,
with a mass of abundant raiment,
with a mass of abundant wives,
a mass of abundant men slaves,
a mass of abundant women slaves.

He might see a monk in a monastery,
his hands and feet properly washed,
who, after eating a delicious meal,
was sitting in the cool shade
intent on the higher thought.

It might occur to him:

'Indeed recluseship is pleasant,
indeed recluseship is healthy.

Suppose that I,
having cut off my hair and beard,
having donned saffron robes,
should go forth from home into homelessness?'

And he might be able
to bring himself to give up
his mass of abundant gold ornaments,
his mass of abundant corn,
a mass of abundant fields,
with a mass of abundant raiment,
with a mass of abundant wives,
a mass of abundant men slaves,
a mass of abundant women slaves
and to go forth from home into homelessness,
having cut off his hair and beard
and having donned saffron robes.

If anyone should speak thus, Uāyin:

'That householder
or his son,
bound by those bonds,
is able to give up his mass of abundant gold ornaments,
his mass of abundant corn,
a mass of abundant fields,
with a mass of abundant raiment,
with a mass of abundant wives,
a mass of abundant men slaves,
a mass of abundant women slaves
and having cut off his hair and beard
and having donned saffron robes,
to go forth from home into homelessness,
because for him it was a strong bond,
a stout bond,
a solid bond,
a bond that does not rot away,
a thick log of wood' -
would any one speaking thus, Uāyin, be speaking rightly?"

"No, revered sir.

That householder
or householder's son,
revered sir,
bound by those bonds,
is able to give up his mass of abundant gold ornaments,
his mass of abundant corn,
a mass of abundant fields,
with a mass of abundant raiment,
with a mass of abundant wives,
a mass of abundant men slaves,
a mass of abundant women slaves
and having cut off his hair and beard
and having donned saffron robes,
to go forth from home into homelessness,
because for him that was a bond of no strength,
a weak bond,
a bond that rots away,
a pithless bond."

"Even so, Uāyin,
some young men of family here,
on being told by me,

'Give this up,'
speak thus:

'But what of this trifling insig- [125] nificant matter to be given up
and of whose giving up
the Lord speaks to us
and of whose rejection
the Well-farer speaks to us?

And they give it up
and they do not cause dissatisfaction
to be nursed against me
or against those monks who desire the training.

These, giving that up,
are unconcerned,
unruffled,
dependent on others,
with a mind become as a wild creature's.

This for them, Uāyin,
is a bond of no strength,
a weak bond,
a bond that rots away,
a pithless bond.

 


 

Uāyin, these four types of persons
are found existing in the world.

What four?

As to this, Uāyin,
a certain person is faring along
towards the getting rid of clinging,[23]
towards the casting out of clinging.

But while he is faring along
towards the getting rid of clinging,
towards the casting out of clinging,
memories and thoughts[24] belonging to clinging
beset him.

He gives in to them,
he does not get rid of them,
he does not dispel them,
he does not make an end of them,
he does not send them to destruction.

I, Uāyin, say that this person
is fettered,[25]
not unfettered.

What is the reason for this?

Differences in faculties
in this person
are known to me, Uāyin.

And here, Uāyin,
some person is faring along
towards the getting rid of clinging,
towards the casting out of clinging.

But while he is faring along
towards the getting rid of clinging,
towards the casting out of clinging,
memories and thoughts belonging to clinging
beset him.

He does not give in to them,
he gets rid of them,
he dispels them,
he makes an end of them,
he sends them to destruction.

But I say that this person
is also fettered, Uāyin,
not unfettered.

What is the reason for this?

Differences in faculties
in this person
are known to me, Uāyin.

And some person here, Uāyin,
is faring along
towards the getting rid of clinging,
towards the casting out of clinging.

While he is faring along
towards the getting rid of clinging,
towards the casting out of clinging,
from confusion in mindfulness
memories and thoughts belonging to clinging
at times beset him.

Slow, Uāyin,
is the arising of mindfulness,
and then he gets rid of it quickly,
dispels it,
makes an end of it,
sends it to destruction.

Udayin, it is as if a man
were to let two or three drops of water
fall into an iron pot
that had been heated all day long.

Slow, Uāyin,
is the falling of the drops of water,
but they would be quickly destroyed and consumed.

Even so, Uāyin,
some person here is faring along
towards the getting rid [126] of clinging,
towards the casting out of clinging.

While he is faring along
towards the getting rid of clinging,
towards the casting out of clinging,
from confusion in mindfulness
memories and thoughts belonging to clinging
at times beset him.

Slow, Uāyin,
is the arising of mindfulness,
and then he gets rid of it quickly,
dispels it,
makes an end of it,
sends it to destruction.

I, Uāyin, say that this person is also fettered,
not unfettered.

What is the reason for this?

Differences in faculties
in this person
are known to me, Uāyin.

But some person here, Uāyin,
thinking,

'Clinging is the root of anguish,'

and having understood it so,
he is without clinging,
freed by the destruction of clinging.

I, Uāyin, say that this person is unfettered,
not fettered.

What is the reason for this?

Differences in faculties
in this person
are known to me, Uāyin.

 


 

There are these five strands of sense-pleasures,[26] Uāyin.

What five?

What are the five?

Material shapes cognisable by the eye,
agreeable,
pleasant,
liked,
enticing,
connected with sensual pleasures,
alluring.

Sounds cognisable by the ear,
agreeable,
pleasant,
liked,
enticing,
connected with sensual pleasures,
alluring.

Smells cognisable by the nose,
agreeable,
pleasant,
liked,
enticing,
connected with sensual pleasures,
alluring.

Tastes cognisable by the tongue,
agreeable,
pleasant,
liked,
enticing,
connected with sensual pleasures,
alluring.

Touches cognisable by the body,
agreeable,
pleasant,
liked,
enticing,
connected with sensual pleasures,
alluring.

These, Uāyin, are the five strands of sense-pleasures.

Whatever happiness,
whatever joy, Uāyin,
arises in consequence
of these five strands of senseḤpleasures,
it is called
a happiness of sense-pleasures
that is a vile happiness,
the happiness of an average person,
an unariyan happiness.

It should not be pursued,
developed
or made much of.

I say of this happiness
that it is to be feared.

In this connection, Uāyin, a monk,
aloof from the pleasures of the senses,
aloof from unskilled states of mind,
enters and abides in the first meditation
which is accompanied by initial thought
and discursive thought,
is born of aloofness,
and is rapturous and joyful.

And again, monks, a monk,
by allaying initial and discursive thought,
his mind subjectively tranquillised
and fixed on one point,
enters on
and abides in
the second meditation
which is devoid of initial and discursive thought,
is born of concentration
and is rapturous and joyful.

And again, monks, a monk,
by the fading out of rapture,
dwells with equanimity,
attentive and clearly conscious,
and experiences in his person
that joy of which the ariyans say:
'Joyful lives he who has equanimity and is mindful,'
and he enters on
and abides in
the third meditation.

And again, monks, a monk
by getting rid of joy,
by getting rid of anguish,
by the going down of his former pleasures and sorrows,
enters on
and abides in
the fourth meditation
which has neither anguish nor joy,
and which is entirely purified
by equanimity and mindfulness.

This is called the happiness of renunciation,
the happiness of aloofness,
the happiness of tranquillity,
the happiness of self-awakening.[27]

It should be pursued,
developed
and made much of.

I say of this happiness
that it is not to be feared.

 


 

[127] As to this, Uāyin, a monk,
aloof from the pleasures of the senses,
aloof from unskilled states of mind,
enters and abides in the first meditation
which is accompanied by initial thought
and discursive thought,
is born of aloofness,
and is rapturous and joyful.

I, Uāyin, say
that this is in the unstable.[28]

And what is in the unstable there?

That very initial and discursive thought
that is not stopped there -
this is in the unstable there.

As to this, Uāyin, a monk,
by allaying initial and discursive thought,
his mind subjectively tranquillised
and fixed on one point,
enters on
and abides in
the second meditation
which is devoid of initial and discursive thought,
is born of concentration
and is rapturous and joyful.

I, Uāyin, say
that this too is in the unstable.

And what is in the unstable there?

That very rapture and joy
that are not stopped there -
these are in the unstable there.

As to this, Uāyin, a monk,
by the fading out of rapture,
dwells with equanimity,
attentive and clearly conscious,
and experiences in his person
that joy of which the ariyans say:
'Joyful lives he who has equanimity and is mindful,'
and he enters on
and abides in
the third meditation.

I, Uāyin, say
that this too is in the unstable.

And what is in the unstable there?

That very happiness in equanimity
that is not stopped there -
this is in the unstable there.

As to this, Uāyin, a monk,
by getting rid of joy,
by getting rid of anguish,
by the going down of his former pleasures and sorrows,
enters on
and abides in
the fourth meditation
which has neither anguish nor joy,
and which is entirely purified
by equanimity and mindfulness.

I, Uāyin, say that this is in the stable.

 


 

As to this, Uāyin, a monk,

by allaying initial and discursive thought,
his mind subjectively tranquillised
and fixed on one point,
enters on
and abides in
the second meditation
which is devoid of initial and discursive thought,
is born of concentration
and is rapturous and joyful.

I, Uāyin, say,

'This is not enough,'

I say,

'Get rid of it,'

I say,

'Transcend it.'

And what, Uāyin,
is its transcending?

As to this, Uāyin, a monk,
by allaying initial and discursive thought,
his mind subjectively tranquillised
and fixed on one point,
enters on
and abides in
the second meditation
which is devoid of initial and discursive thought,
is born of concentration
and is rapturous and joyful.

This is its transcending.

But I, Uāyin, again say,

'This is not enough,'

I say,

'Get rid of it,'

I say,

'Transcend it.'

And what, Uāyin,
is its transcending?

As to this, Uāyin, a monk,
by the fading out of rapture,
dwells with equanimity,
attentive and clearly conscious,
and experiences in his person
that joy of which the ariyans say:
'Joyful lives he who has equanimity and is mindful,'
and he enters on
and abides in
the third meditation.

This is its transcending.

But I, Uāyin, again say,

'This is not enough,'

I say,

'Get rid of it,'

I say,

'Transcend it.'

And what, Uāyin,
is its transcending?

As to this, Uāyin, a monk,
by getting rid of happiness,
by getting rid of anguish,
by the going down of his former pleasures and sorrows,
enters on
and abides in
the fourth meditation
which has neither anguish nor joy,
and which is entirely purified
by equanimity and mindfulness.

This is its transcending.

But I, Uāyin, again say,

'This is not enough,'

I say,

'Get rid of it,'

I say,

'Transcend it.'

And what, Uāyin,
is its transcending?

As to this, Uāyin, a monk,
by wholly transcending perception of material shapes,
by the going down of perception of sensory reactions,
by not attending to perception of variety,
thinking:
'Ether is unending,'
enters on
and abides in the plane [128] of infinite ether.

This is its transcending.

But I, Uāyin, again say,

'This is not enough,'

I say,

'Get rid of it,'

I say,

'Transcend it.'

And what, Uāyin,
is its transcending?

As to this, Uāyin, a monk,
by wholly transcending the plane of infinite ether,
thinking:
'Consciousness is unending,'
enters on
and abides in
the plane of infinite consciousness.

This is its transcending.

But I, Uāyin, again say,

'This is not enough,'

I say,

'Get rid of it,'

I say,

'Transcend it.'

And what, Uāyin,
is its transcending?

As to this, Uāyin, a monk,
by wholly transcending the plane of infinite consciousness,
thinking:
'There is not anything,'
enters on
and abides in
the plane of no-thing.

This is its transcending.

But I, Uāyin, again say,

'This is not enough,'

I say,

'Get rid of it,'

I say,

'Transcend it.'

And what, Uāyin,
is its transcending?

As to this, Uāyin, a monk,
by wholly transcending the plane of no-thing,
enters on
and abides in
the plane of neither-perception-nor-non-perception.

This is its transcending.

But I, Uāyin, again say,

'This is not enough,'

I say,

'Get rid of it,'

I say,

'Transcend it.'

And what, Uāyin,
is its transcending?

As to this, Uāyin, a monk,
by wholly transcending the plane of neither-perception-nor-non-perception,
enters on
and abides in
the stopping of perception and feeling.

This is its transcending.

It is for this that I, Uāyin, speak
even of the getting rid of the plane of neither-perception-nor non-perception.

Now do you, Uāyin,
see any fetter,
minute or massive,
of the getting rid of which
I have not spoken to you?"[29]

"No, revered sir."

Thus spoke the Lord.

Delighted, the venerable Uāyin
rejoiced in what the Lord had said.

Discourse on the Simile of the Quail:
The Sixth

 


[1] Potaliya Suita, M. i. 359, was preached here.

[2] Quoted at Kvu. 528.

[3] See Vin. iv. 85, and B.D. ii. 335, n, Pāc. 37 makes it an offence to eat after noon has passed until the next sunrise. See M. i. 474.

[4] rattandhakāratimisāya; cf. D. iii. 85, Pug. 30.

[5] MA. iii. 164 explains māṇava, as is often tbe case, by cora, thief.

[6] Cf. Pāc. 6 (Vin. iv. 17 ff.).

[7] Quoted at DA. 34.

[8] As at Vin. ii. 115.

[9] bhikkhussa ātu māri bhikkhussa mātu māri. According to Trenckner (M. i. 567) the text "no doubt purports to make the woman speak a sort of patois."

[10] adhisallikhati; as at A. i. 236. See G.S. i. 217, n. 1, and Neumann, vol. i. 22, n. MA. iii. 165 explains by atisallekhati ativāyama karoti.

[11] This trifling matter.

[12] The foolish people.

[13] thūla kaḷiŋgara. MA. iii. 166 says it is like a great piece of wood tied to their throats. cf. S. ii. 268, Dhp. 41.

[14] Cf. D. i. 91.

[15] āgameti = upeti, MA. iii. 166.

[16] As at Vin. ii. 184. See B.D. v. 259 for notes.

[17] As at M. i. 414.

[18] Cf. A. ii. 33; S. iii. 85.

[19] These three terms at M. ii. 178, A. iii. 351-2.

[20] As at M. i. 80.

[21] agāraka. MA. iii. 167 says khuddakageha, little house.

[22] nikkhagaṇa.

[23] upadhi, a residual basis remaining for a new birth.

[24] sarasaŋkappa, as at M. iii. 89, 132, S. iv. 70, 190.

[25] saɱyutta.

[26] As at M. i. 85.

[27] These four 'happinesses,' sukha, occur also at A. iv. 341-342.

[28] iñjitasmiɱ, what can be stirred or moved. cf. S. i. 109: there is no instability in the wholly freed Buddhas. Cf. also S. iv. 202, Sn. 750.

[29] Quoted at MA. ii. 109 in explanation of "even (right) states of mind are to be got rid of," as said at end of the Parable of the Raft.

 


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