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Saɱyutta Nikāya
3. Khandha Vagga
22. Khandha Saɱyutta
1. Pathama Nakula-Pita Vagga

The Book of the Kindred Sayings
3. The Book Called the Khandhā-Vagga
Containing Kindred Sayings on the Elements of Sensory Existence and other Subjects
22. Kindred Sayings on Elements
1. Nakulapitar (the First)

Sutta 3

Pathama Hāliddikāni Suttaɱ

Hāliddikāni

Translated by F. L. Woodward
Edited by Mrs. Rhys Davids

Copyright The Pali Text Society
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[9] [10]

[1][than][bodh] THUS have I heard:—

Once the venerable Kaccāna[1] the Great was dwelling among the folk of Avanti
at Ospreys' Haunt
on a sheer mountain crag.[2]

Then the housefather Hāliddikāni came to the venerable Kaccāna the Great
and saluting him sat down at one side.

So seated the housefather Hāliddikāni thus addressed the venerable Kaccāna the Great:

"Master, it was said by the Exalted One
in the eighth chapter in the Questions of Māgandiya[3]

'Home he abandons: homeless wandering
The sage with village-folk not making ties.
Empty of lusts, showing no preference,[4]
With no man wageth wordy warfare more.'

Pray, Master, how should one regard the full meaning
of this concisely spoken saying
of the Exalted One?"

"The material element, housefather,
is the home of consciousness.[5]

Now consciousness,
being lust-tied to the material [11] element,
is called 'home-haunter.'

Then again, housefather, the feeling-element
is the home of consciousness.

Thus being lust-tied to the feeling-element,
consciousness is called 'home-haunter.'

Now the perception-element, housefather,
is the home of consciousness.

Thus being lust-tied to the perception-element,
consciousness is called 'home-haunter.'

Now the activities-element, housefather,
is the home of consciousness.

Thus being lust-tied to the activities element,
consciousness is called 'home-haunter.'[6]

That, housefather,
is the meaning of the word
'home-haunter.'

And how, housefather,
is one a 'home-abandoner'?

Now as to the material element, housefather,
that desire, that lust, that lure,
that craving,
those system-graspings,
that mental standpoint,
that dogmatic bias
which is inherent therein[7]
— all these for a Tathāgata are struck off,
cut down at the root,
made like a palm-tree stump,
made things that have ceased to be,
so that they cannot grow up again in the future.[8]

So it is also, housefather,
with the feeling-element,
the perception-element,
the activities-element,
the consciousness-element
— that desire, that lust, that lure,
cannot grow up again in the future.

Therefore, housefather,
a Tathāgata is called 'home-abandoner.'

That is the meaning of the word.

And how is one an 'adherent'?[9]

One who is in bondage to the impressions[10] of things seen, housefather,
is called 'adherent.'

Likewise with regard to sounds,
smells,
savours,
tangibles
and mental objects
— he who is in bondage to these impressions
is called 'adherent.'

And how is one 'non-adherent,' housefather?

Such bondage to impressions of things seen is,
for a Tathāgata,
struck off,
cut down at the root,
made like a palm-tree [12] stump,
made things that have ceased to be,
so that they cannot grow up again in the future.

Therefore, housefather, a Tathāgata is called 'non-adherent.'

So also with regard to sounds,
smells,
savours,
tangibles
and mental objects
— such bondage is not found in a Tathāgata:
therefore is he called 'non-adherent.'

That, housefather, is the meaning of the word.

And how is one 'a former of ties in the village'?[11]

Herein, housefather,
a certain one lives intimate with householders.

He shares their joys and sorrows;
among the happy he is happy,
among the unhappy he is unhappy.

When affairs of business arise,
he involves himself in these.

That, housefather, is how one is 'a former of ties in the village.'

And how is one 'no former of ties in the village'?

Herein, housefather, a brother[12] dwells not associating with householders:
he shares not their joys and sorrows,
is not happy amid the happy,
unhappy amid the unhappy.

When affairs of business arise,
he does not involve himself in them.

Thus, housefather, one forms no ties in the village.

And how is one 'not empty'?[13]

Herein, housefather, a certain one
has not abandoned lust,
has not abandoned desire,
nor affection,
nor thirst,
nor fever and craving.

Thus, housefather, he is 'not empty.'

And how is one 'empty'?

Herein, housefather, a certain one
has abandoned lust,
has abandoned desire,
likewise affection
and thirst,
fever and craving.

Thus, housefather, is one 'empty.'

And how does one 'show no preference'?[14]

Herein, housefather, one thinks thus:

'May I have such and such a body in future time:
may I feel thus and thus:
may I perceive thus and thus:
may my activities be such and such:
may my consciousness be such and such in future time.'

Thus, housefather, does one show preference.

[13] And how does one 'show no preference'?

Herein, housefather, one does not think thus:

'May I have such and such a body in future time:
may I feel,
may I perceive thus and thus:
may my activities be such and such:
may my consciousness be such and such in future time.'

Thus, housefather, does one show no preference.

And how is one a 'wager of wordy warfare with people'?

Herein, housefather, a certain one makes talk like this:

'You know not about this norm-discipline.[15]

I do know about this norm-discipline.

How could you know about it?

You have fallen on wrong views.[16]

I have come by right views.

You speak last what should come first,
and first what should come last.

I am speaking to the point:
you are not.[17]

What you have thought out so long is quite upset.[18]

Your view is confuted.

Go, explain yourself.

You are shown up.

Clear yourself if you can!"

That, housefather, is how one is a
'wager of wordy warfare with people.'

And how is one
'no wager of wordy warfare with people'?

Herein, housefather, a brother makes not talk like this:

'You know not about this norm-discipline.

I do know about this norm-discipline.

How could you know about it?

You have fallen on wrong views.

I have come by right views.

You speak last what should come first,
and first what should come last.

I am speaking to the point:
you are not.

What you have thought out so long is quite upset.

Your view is confuted.

Go, explain yourself.

You are shown up.

Clear yourself if you can!'

That is how one is 'no wager of wordy warfare with people.'

And this, housefather, is the meaning
of what was said by the Exalted One
in the eighth chapter of Magandiya's Questions, to wit:

'Home he abandons: homeless wandering
The sage with village-folk not making ties.
Empty of lusts, showing no preference,
With no man wageth wordy warfare more.'

Thus, housefather, should be understood in full
what was concisely stated by the Exalted One.'

 


[1] Pronounce Kach-chāna.

[2] Cf. S. iv, 1l5, 288, and Udāna vi, 1, where Comy. so translates, reading papāte pabbate. Here Comy. reads papāte pavatte for text pavatte pabbate.

[3] The name of a section of Sutta Nipāta, where (v, 844) the quotation occurs. See Comy. on it (Param. Jot. ii, 547), and M. ii, 510. [?]

[4]Apurekkarāno (text wrongly apurakkharāno). Comy. at Sn. says, 'not giving rise to any future personality.' The word means 'showing no preference.'

[5] Cf. Dhp. 34; Thag. 36.

[6] Comy. asks, 'Why does he omit the fifth factor, consciousness-element? and says sammoha-vighāt'atthaŋ, 'to obviate any confusion.'

[7] Cf. S. ii, 17; K.S. ii, 13.

[8] S. ii, 88; K.S. 44.

[9] Niketa-sārī. Niketa, connected with ketu, 'sign or banner,' thus , follower of a token,' an adherent.

[10] Nimitta.

[11] Cf. S. i, 63; ii, 202, for the duties of the bhikkhu.

[12] The 'freeman' is here regarded as the bhikkhu or mendicant, for he alone is not bound by such ties.

[13] Ritto.

[14] Comy., vattaŋ purato kurumāno, purekkharāno, see above, 'showing' preference for such and such a future state.' Comy. to Sn. 844.

[15] Dhamma-vinaya, the original name for the Buddha's method. See the Introduction to Oldenberg's Vinaya Piṭaka.

[16] Dial. i, 14 (D. i, 8); D. iii, 117. S. i, 160; iv, 323; v, 419, etc.

[17] Sahitarŋ. Comy., 'coherent,' siliṭṭhaŋ. Sahitaŋ me, 'the combine is mine.'

[18] Comy., adhicinnaŋ te viparāvattarŋ. S. v, 419 reads āciṇṇaŋ 'your system or performance.'


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